KALW | Local Public Radio
Anissa Malady

Lawrence Ferlinghetti at 100: Bay Area poets pay tribute

Lawrence Ferlinghetti will be 100 years old this Sunday. The poet and painter was the contemporary of authors Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs. In 1953, he opened City Lights bookstore in San Francisco’s North Beach — the first all-paperback bookseller in the country.

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The Bay Area braces for Uber & Lyft IPOs

On this edition of Your Call, how many millionaires can the Bay Area sustain? When Uber and Lyft go public this year, thousands of employees will become incredibly wealthy overnight. Home prices are expected to go up, making the Bay Area even more unaffordable for working class people.

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Saudi Arabia's Delicate Dance On The Fate Of Yemen

Oct 7, 2011

Saudi Arabia, which places a premium on stability, appears to be sending mixed messages these days on what it wants from its volatile southern neighbor, Yemen.

On one hand, the kingdom is demanding that Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh step aside after months of protests against his more than 30 years of rule.

As the U.S. winds down military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and troops come home, many are eager to start work in the civilian sector. But it's been tough: The federal government reports the unemployment rate for young veterans has hovered around 30 percent this year.

Toyota Redesigns The Camry, Aiming To Stay On Top

Oct 4, 2011

Tinkering with success can be a dangerous thing. A redesigned version of the Toyota Camry, America's best-selling car for the past nine years, is going on sale in the U.S.

Toyota recently lost market share and has suffered through bad PR due to recalls, in addition to dealing with the continuing aftereffects of the Japan earthquake. Toyota executives are betting on the new Camry to jump-start the company's future.

In Episode #25, Alameda County Chief Probation Officer David Muhammad discusses California's criminal justice realignment, his efforts to reform Washington, DC's juvenile justice system, the importance of building community partnerships, how he went from being a youth on probation in Oakland to the Chief Probation Officer, and more.

David Muhammad Interview Highlights:

Muhammad on California’s Criminal Justice Realignment:

Widows Win Legal Victory In Indonesia Massacre Case

Sep 27, 2011

In Indonesia, many people are celebrating what they see as a long-delayed victory for justice and human rights. Representatives of a village in West Java that was the site of a massacre by Dutch colonial soldiers 64 years ago sued the Dutch government and won.

The Dutch court ruled that the government must now compensate the victims' seven surviving widows. One of them is 84-year-old Cawi Binti Baisan.

Wilhelm Furtwaengler: A Complex German Conductor

Aug 29, 2011

Note: Wilhelm Furtwangler's last name is typically spelled with an umlaut over the 'a' character. The npr website does not support characters with umlauts over characters. A variation of Furtwangler's name without the umlaut is spelled Furtwaengler.

Wilhelm Furtwaengler's name may be hard for Americans to pronounce, but the reason this great conductor isn't so well-remembered here is that he chose to remain in Germany during WWII, though he was never a member of the Nazi Party, and was exonerated by a postwar tribunal.

In Episode #24, Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeffrey Rosen discusses creating a Conviction Integrity Unit to investigate past cases with alleged misconduct and provide training to prevent future misconduct, his new policy on medical marijuana dispensaries, the importance of transparency in officer-involved shooting investigations, and more.

Jeffrey Rosen Interview Highlights:

Rosen on Creating a Conviction Integrity Unit:

In Episode #23, Program Director at Community Justice Works Sujata Baliga discusses her innovative restorative justice work in the Alameda County juvenile justice system, how she got strong buy-in from law enforcement for restorative justice programming, her own personal history as a survivor of crime and her experience sharing her story with people serving time for violent offenses, and more.

Sujata Baliga Interview Highlights

Baliga on How Restorative Justice Differs from the Traditional Justice System:

In Episode #22, Former Director of the Michigan Department of Corrections Patricia Caruso discusses how Michigan reduced its prison population and reduced recidivism through a “Justice Reinvestment” strategy, why corrections officials should care about what happens when people leave prison, Michigan’s innovative reentry initiative, lessons other states can take from the Michigan experience, and more.

Patricia Caruso Interview Highlights

Caruso on the Culture Change in How Wardens See Their Role:

In Episode #21, Co-Founder of the Stanford Three Strikes Project Michael Romano discusses how the California Three Strikes law can lead to life sentences for people with minor offenses, how students in his project have helped a dozen such clients get released from prison after having their sentences reduced, and the need to reform Three Strikes so that it focuses on serious and violent offenders.

Michael Romano Interview Highlights

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Latest News from NPR

President Trump continues to pile on criticism of the late Sen. John McCain, complaining on Wednesday during a speech in Ohio that the Arizona senator's family never thanked him for the Vietnam War hero's funeral, which involved large ceremonies in Washington, D.C.

"I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve," Trump told a crowd at an Army tank manufacturing plant in Lima. "I don't care about this. I didn't get [a] thank you. That's okay. We sent him on the way, but I wasn't a fan of John McCain."

Fair warning: It may be tough to find some of the 2019 Whiting Award winners on the shelves of your local bookstore. Most of the emerging writers have little more than a single widely published book to their name. A couple of them don't even have that.

Nine days before Britain's scheduled departure from the European Union, European Council President Donald Tusk said Wednesday that an extension for withdrawal is possible – but only if U.K. parliament members approve Prime Minister Theresa May's terms.

The condition stands to push British parliamentarians to vote a third time on May's deal or prepare for a historic divorce without any deal at all.

Boeing's bestselling jetliner, the 737 Max, has crashed twice in six months — the Lion Air disaster in October and the Ethiopian Airlines crash this month. Nearly 350 people have been killed, and the model of plane has been grounded indefinitely as investigations are underway.

Boeing has maintained the planes are safe. But trust — from the public, from airlines, from pilots and regulators — has been shaken.

So far, experts say, Boeing has mishandled this crisis but has the opportunity to win back confidence in the future.

When Cyclone Idai, a devastating tropical storm, swept across southeastern Africa on Thursday, it killed at least 150 people, displaced hundreds of thousands and left Beira, a coastal city of a half-million people in central Mozambique, almost totally destroyed.

In the aftermath, with some of their neighbors still trapped on rooftops or in trees, some local residents began the long process of recovery with a small but notable rebuttal to nature, by beginning to move the beach back to its rightful place.

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