KALW | Local Public Radio
Holly J. McDede / KALW

The Fight For People's Park Continues Over 50 Years Later

The battle over the right to access People’s Park in Berkeley began over 50 years ago, but it never really ended. Now, UC Berkeley plans to develop the space into housing for students as well as homeless people.

Read More

San Francisco author James Nestor reads from his book, "Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art." It’s about how humans, as a species, have lost the ability to breathe properly. 

Nye Lyn Tho

In her poetic memoir, "Who's Your Daddy" Arisa White writes about being, a young, queer Black woman carrying the weight of her father’s absence. Her journey to finding her father started with her mother giving Arisa her father's address in Guyana.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

The battle over the right to access People’s Park in Berkeley began over 50 years ago, but it never really ended. Now, UC Berkeley plans to develop the space into housing for students as well as homeless people.

The Fight For People's Park / Poet Arisa White

17 minutes ago

The battle for People’s Park in Berkeley has been going on for more than 50 years. Today, we’ll hear about how it all started. Then, poet Arisa White writes about her struggles growing up without her father in her newest book Who’s Your Daddy." And, we hear a reading from El Cerrito poet Maw Shein Win. Plus, today's local music features a new album from Oakland-based artist Javier Santiago.

California To Give 40% Of Vaccine Doses To Vulnerable Areas / San Francisco Finalizes Plan To Give COVID-19 Vaccination Access Codes To Teachers / State Bill Would Seal Or Expunge Some Prison Records

ANGELA LILLEY BENNETT

 

Tom Heyman is a San Francisco-based singer-songwriter, guitarist, and recording artist. In this week's My Mixtape, he shares one of his own songs that "seems to capture the wary cynicism crossed with a little bit of hope that seems to be me".  

California To Give 40% Of Vaccine Doses To Vulnerable Areas

3 hours ago
Russ Allison Loar / Flickr / Creative Commons

California will begin setting aside 40% of all vaccine doses for people who live in the most vulnerable neighborhoods in an effort to inoculate people most at risk from the coronavirus and get the state’s economy open more quickly.

Beowulf Sheehan

New York Times columnist Charles Blow envisions a succinct and counterintuitive corrective to myths about race and geography in America, and presents a roadmap to generate an unprecedented shift in Black political power.

Vaccine Access Expands Across California, But Only For Some / State GOP Sued For Discrimination / Attorney General Issues Consumer Warning About Illegal COVID-19 Fees / Study Shows Stockton Basic Income Experiment Has Been Successful

Almanac - Thursday 3/4/21

11 hours ago

Today is World Book Day. It's also the birthday of children's book author Dav Pilkey...


Pages

Introducing... STATE OF THE BAY

City Visions has a new look... And a new name.

Latest News from NPR

Robert Muggah is a principal of the SecDev Group and cofounder of the Igarape Institute. His latest book, Terra Incognita, co-authored with Ian Goldin, focuses on the systemic threats facing our world.

Senate Democrats are moving ahead with an updated version of the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package that includes several tweaks intended to satisfy some moderates ahead of an expected final vote in the coming days.

The Senate voted 51-50 along party lines to advance the bill on Thursday. Vice President Harris voted with all Democrats to break the tie and move ahead with the lengthy debate and amendment process.

In the middle of a pandemic, Mavis Owureku-Asare is optimistic.

The reason? On February 24, her homeland, Ghana, became the first low-resource country to receive free COVID-19 vaccines through COVAX.

"I feel very hopeful," says Owureku-Asare, a food scientist with the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and a 2020 Aspen New Voices fellow. "Ghana has become a role model for other countries."

Updated at 5:06 p.m. ET

OPEC and its allies said Thursday they are keeping oil production largely steady, even as crude prices stage a remarkable recovery, betting that a restrained approach will lay the groundwork for prices to climb even more.

Russia and Kazakhstan will raise their output modestly, but all other members of the alliance will hold their production steady instead of returning more oil to the global market. Saudi Arabia also said it will extend its voluntary cut in oil production of 1 million barrels per day into April.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday made it more difficult for undocumented immigrants who have lived in the U.S. for a long time to fight deportation. The court's 5-to-3 ruling came in the case of a man who had lived in the U.S. for 25 years but who had used a fake Social Security card to get a job as a janitor.

More News

Sponsorship for Local Businesses

Special rates and packages