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Thomas Scott / AC Transit

East Bay Speeds Up With Tempo

On Sunday, AC Transit launched the new Tempo line along the International Avenue corridor . Tempo is the Bay Area’s second bus rapid transit line or BRT. It features bus-only lanes and new technology to bypass most traffic signals. That’s why it’s ‘rapid’.

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The Latest from Your Call

Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, And The White Nationalist Agenda

On this edition of Your Call, investigative journalist Jean Guerrero discusses her new book Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda .

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Pikist


San Francisco has been talking about turning a parking lot next to City College’s Ocean Campus into housing for decades.

Contact Tracing Sees Boost In Donations / California To Vote On Eviction And Foreclosure Proceedings Tomorrow 

Photo by Sandip Roy

Sandip Roy wonders if the new normal is really normal.

"Coronavirus Rhapsody" by Raúl Iravién on YouTube here:

Almanac - Wednesday 8/12/20

10 hours ago

It's World Elephants Day...


Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, And The White Nationalist Agenda

15 hours ago


  On this edition of Your Call, investigative journalist Jean Guerrero discusses her new book Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda.

A.C.T.

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the Bay Area performing arts in Times of Corona, we welcome to the virtual stage of our Corona Radio Theater, members of the American Conservatory Theater, performing an excerpt from The Headlands, a mystery play by Bay Area native and Obie Award–winning playwright, Christopher Chen

Bay Area Headlines: Tuesday, 8/11/20, AM

Aug 11, 2020

New Expanded Unemployment Benefits / Sandra Shewry And Erica Pan Appointed To Be Calfornia's Interim Public Health Directors / Uber And Lyft Appeal Ruling To Treat Drivers As Employees

On today’s encore edition of Binah, legendary investigative journalist Bob Woodward discusses his reporting from Nixon to Trump, and the challenges faced today by the press, the presidency and American democracy.

Almanac - Tuesday 8/11/20

Aug 11, 2020

On this day in 3114 BCE, today is the beginning of the Mesoamerican Long Count Calendar...


Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group


  On this edition of Your Call, we’re discussing how college graduates are coping as they enter one of the bleakest job markets in history. The average college student owes $29,000 in debt and now they're facing soaring unemployment. How are they coping?

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Latest News from NPR

A broken cable at Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory has torn a gaping 100-foot hole in the dish of one of the largest radio telescopes in the world, taking the instrument offline until repairs can be made.

Arecibo's massive reflector dish, which is built inside a sinkhole in northern Puerto Rico, was damaged when a 3-inch diameter support cable unexpectedly snapped before dawn on Monday, according to the University of Central Florida, which manages the observatory.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

The Big 12 Conference is moving ahead with its football season, announcing that fall sports will continue – with teams following safety precautions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The conference hopes to hold its title game in December, as it normally would.

After George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis in late May, waves of anguished and outraged Americans took to the streets, to livestreamed city council meetings and to social media to denounce racism.

Protesters called for police reform, defunding or outright abolition; for an end to qualified immunity for officers; for reinvestment in underfunded communities; for schools, companies and communities to address their own complicity in racial inequity.

And they called for Confederate monuments to come down.

Much to the dismay of college sports fans, the coronavirus pandemic has caused the Big Ten and Pac-12 athletic conferences to put their fall sports schedules on hold.

A federal judge in New York struck down a Trump administration decision to scale back U.S. government protections for migratory birds. The change by the administration would have allowed companies that accidentally kill migratory birds during the course of their work no longer to face the possibility of criminal prosecution.

In a 31-page document, U.S. District Judge Valerie Caproni cited the novel To Kill a Mockingbird to support her decision.

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