KALW | Local Public Radio

How Alameda County Is Trying To Get 'Hard To Count’ Populations To Fill Out The 2020 Census

The deadline to get counted for Census 2020 is just around the corner — September 30. The good news is California has surpassed its 2010 census response rate. But, a quarter of Californians are considered "hard to count" because of language barriers, mistrust in government, or because they are unhoused or undocumented.

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YLR: A Tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg

2 hours ago

Many of us have experienced the loss of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg in different ways; but, it was undeniably a tremendous loss.

Almanac - Tuesday 9/22/20

8 hours ago

Today is Business Woman's Day, and it's also Ice Cream Cone Day, as well...


RENNETT STOWE


  On this edition of Your Call, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with award winning journalist Ben Ehrenreich, author of Desert Notebooks: A Road Map for the End of Time. He examines how the unprecedented pace of destruction to the planet has led us to the brink of calamity. 

California To Halt Unemployment Claims For Two Weeks

18 hours ago
"Sigh" by TMAB2003 is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

For the next two weeks California will not be taking any new unemployment claims. The timing’s tough: more than two million Californians are currently out of work.

It’s crunch time for census 2020 — there's only nine days left and the focus on reading "hard to count" populations. We get an update on the progress in Alameda County. Then, Oakland DJ Nina Sol talks about her love for spinning and how she’s now getting the party started—virtually. And, the Folsom Street Fair is going virtual this weekend, but did you ever wonder how it got its start?

Oakland DJ Nina Sol talks about spinning for virtual parties during the age of COVID and why she infuses her sound with messages of justice, freedom, and love.

The deadline to get counted for Census 2020 is just around the corner — September 30. The good news is California has surpassed its 2010 census response rate. But, a quarter of Californians are considered "hard to count" because of language barriers, mistrust in government, or because they are unhoused or undocumented.

by Peter Kaminski, licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

Measure V would raise the hotel room tax in East Palo Alto. Every year, the proceeds would go toward improving affordable housing.

Let’s get some background. When you stay in a hotel or any short-term rental for a period of 30 days or less, part of what you pay is called a Transient Occupancy Tax. 

Lance Gardner / KALW

Listener Katie Taylor asked us to find out how San Francisco’s Folsom Street became “the center of sexy times.” KALW Audio Academy Fellow Lance Gardner went to find out.

California's Updated COVID-19 Death Count Is 4th Highest In Nation And Caseload Is 1st / State Employment Development Department Will Not Consider New Claims For Two Weeks

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Latest News from NPR

Copyright 2020 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

In a year that's been plenty scary, this much is clear: Pandemic Halloween will be different than regular Halloween. Many traditional ways of celebrating are now considerably more frightful than usual, because now they bring the risk of spreading the coronavirus.

Past occupants of the White House have placed their business holdings into a blind trust. Not President Trump.

Forbes magazine investigative journalist Dan Alexander has pored over business records, mortgage documents and government reports — and even staked out some Trump properties — to assemble a detailed picture of the president's business interests. He says the president has broken a number of pledges he made about how he would conduct business while in office.

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When COVID-19 claimed its first 100,000 lives in the U.S., Hidalgo County, Texas, seemed to have avoided the worst of it. The county, which sits on the border with Mexico, had just 10 deaths when the U.S. crossed that tragic milestone on May 27.

It's still unknown when a COVID-19 vaccine might be available in the United States. But when one is first approved, there may only be 10 million to 15 million doses available, which may be enough to cover around 3% to 5% of the U.S. population.

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