David Boyer | KALW

David Boyer

Managing Editor, Crosscurrents

For the past 11 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times.  This week, many have started leaving their homes to protest another pandemic. 

Bay Area Headlines: Monday, 6/1/20, PM

Jun 1, 2020

Protests End In Arrests As Interfaith Leaders Push For Peaceful Demonstration / Governor Newsom Responds To Protests / CA's Top Education Official Calls For Action On Racism In Schools

Ep. 10 - I Have A Bucket

May 29, 2020

For the past 10 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a family questioning their memorial day trip down the coast, a potter who gets a positive test, and a mother afraid to send her kid back to school. It's Day By Day: KALW's Quarantine Diaries.

Zoom

 

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

For the past nine weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a senior who sings, a teacher on his last day of class, and a bookseller happy to see regulars again.  It’s Day By Day: KALW’s Quarantine Diaries.

Zoom

 

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

For the past eight weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from an 88-year-old poet, an unemployed potter, and a frustrated restaurant owner.

While local and state leaders are preparing for the next phase, we’re all still grappling with the way the pandemic has changed our day-to-day lives. For the past seven weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear about new loves, dashed dreams, and the competitive spirit of an 8-year-old Uno champ. 

Zoom

 

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

While local and state leaders are preparing for the next phase, we’re all still grappling with the way the pandemic has changed our day-to-day lives. For the past seven weeks, we’ve been checking in daily with folks from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. Today, we’ll hear about new loves, dashed dreams, and the competitive spirit of an 8-year-old Uno champ. It's the Quarantine Diaries.

Zoom

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

Zoom

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

Gabe Grabin / KALW

Most Bay Area residents are passing their sixth week of shelter-in-place. We’ll hear from a diverse group of locals, including a real estate broker, a new mom, and a funeral director. It’s the Day By Day: Quarantine Diaries.

It’s been 38 days since the shelter-in-place order went into effect in the region. Since then, we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay, including a teacher, a restaurant owner, an artist, a grocery store worker, a nurse, and a ten-year-old. 

Zoom

 

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with local leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

Instagram / cropped

Bay Area shelters and dog rescues are currently closed to the public. So, what’s happening with all the unhoused dogs? Turns out, shelters are getting creative. 

Zoom

While we are sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a series of virtual conversations with local leaders and thinkers who are trying to make sense of this moment and how we will recover. 

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

It’s been 24 days since the shelter-in-place order went into effect in the region. Since then we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay, including a teacher, a restaurant owner, an artist, a grocery store worker, a nurse, and a 10 year-old.

Zoom

 

While we are all sheltered in place, Manny's in San Francisco is presenting a jam-packed series of virtual conversations with folks who are on the frontlines of the crisis and those who will lead the Bay's recovery.

Shereen Adel / KALW

It’s been just a little over two weeks since the Bay Area’s shelter-in-place policy took effect. And it has dramatically changed how most of us live and work. Hear from people all around the Bay Area about daily life during the coronavirus epidemic.

Photo by Jenny G. Shao / KALW

 

On March 17, leaders from six Bay Area counties announced a shelter-in-place policy that’s closed all but essential businesses and confined most people to their homes. Since then, we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay. Together, this group sketches out how the coronavirus epidemic is already changing how we live and work.

Most of us are working from home, including the staff of KALW. In fact, this show was put together using apps like Slack, Zoom and a variety of recording and file sharing services. It’s been an adjustment, but many of us are realizing how much we can communicate and do without meeting in person.

Hear the entire episode on the podcast >>

Burning Man is known for massive, Instagram-friendly art installations that are a stark contrast to the beige, desert backdrop. There are also many smaller projects, labors of love that easily get lost. In this installment, THE INTERSECTION discovers one.

David Boyer / KALW

Hear the entire episode on the podcast >>

Burning Man is pagan at its core with a hellish, flaming aesthetic. It's understandable that many evangelical leaders condemn the event. But why do many devout Christians attend?And what do they do once they're there? THE INTERSECTION finds out. 

Morgan Lieberman

Hear the entire series on the podcast >>

Burning Man is guided by the so-called "10 Princples," one of which is radical inclusion. What does that mean for people with disabilities? Especially at an event that spans seven-square miles of cracked desert, and the most common form of transit is biking.

Peter Field

Hear the entire episode on the podcast >>

The year was 1996. Attendance had doubled. Two people were run over in their tents. Another died in a head-on collision on the playa. Things had to change. But co-founder John Law wasn’t interested in taming the event he helped start. So he walked away.

David Boyer / KALW

THE INTERSECTION looks at changing cities through physical intersections. This time we’re doing something different: The city is temporary and the intersections are conceptual. We’re going to a remote corner of Nevada for Burning Man.