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More news from National Public Radio

The United Kingdom is trying to defuse an escalating standoff with Iran just days before Britain's ruling Conservative Party announces the successor to Theresa May, who is resigning.

The Trump administration is giving Title X recipients more time to comply with new regulations that prohibit organizations that receive federal grants from referring patients for abortion.

Under the new rules, any organization that provides or refers patients for abortions is ineligible for Title X funding.

A cybersecurity expert accused of hacking the data of more than 5 million Bulgarian taxpayers was released by police Wednesday after his charges were downgraded.

Kristian Boykov, a 20-year-old Bulgarian cybersecurity worker, was arrested in Bulgaria's capital Sofia last week in connection to the breach. Police raided his home and seized computers and mobile devices with encrypted information. The hacker was found by police through the computer and software used in the attack, according to the Sofia prosecutor's office.

Irishman Shane Lowry won the British Open on Sunday by six strokes in his first major title.

Lowry, who brought out loud cheers from the sellout crowd on every shot, began the day with a four-stroke lead. He shot one-over 72 and finished with a 15-under 269 total.

He marked the moment he became a major champion with a wide smile and an embrace of his caddie.

The 32-year-old took the title at the Royal Portrush Golf Club in Northern Ireland, just a few hours from where he grew up.

The California condor, North America's largest bird, once ruled the American Southwest and California's coastal mountains. The vulture-like bird was revered by Native Americans and was believed to contain spiritual powers.

Hundreds of years later, its future seemed all but certain. Defying odds, conservation efforts brought the species back and prevented it from joining the dodo in extinction.

Now, condor reintroduction celebrates a milestone: Chick No. 1,000 has hatched.

Tens of thousands of protesters returned to the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday, as opposition to an unpopular extradition bill transformed into a demand that an independent investigation be conducted into the forceful tactics used by police during previous demonstrations.

Over the past seven weeks, millions have been demonstrating against Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, seen by protesters as allowing an erosion of freedoms independent of mainland China.

By 8 a.m., the sun hasn't pierced through dark clouds hanging over India's Brahmaputra River, but it's already warm and humid. People wait for a boat to take them to the Chandanpur char, an island in India's northeastern state of Assam, an hourlong ride from the mainland.

A char is a river island formed by silt carried downriver. Chars rise up and are submerged every few years. Every time a char erodes, the people living there dismantle their homes and move to the next-closest char by boat. They can't afford to move to the mainland.

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If you're in the central and eastern parts of the country, you know you're dealing with heat - highs in the 90s and even the hundreds. And in many areas, especially cities, the temperature isn't dropping that much at night, so air conditioning units are working overtime, and they're breaking. NPR's Mayowa Aina took a ride with some HVAC technicians in northern Virginia this weekend who are helping people keep their cool.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

If you're in the central and eastern parts of the country, you know you're dealing with heat - highs in the 90s and even the hundreds. And in many areas, especially cities, the temperature isn't dropping that much at night, so air conditioning units are working overtime, and they're breaking. NPR's Mayowa Aina took a ride with some HVAC technicians in northern Virginia this weekend who are helping people keep their cool.

Anya Kamenetz is an NPR education correspondent, a host of Life Kit and author of The Art Of Screen Time. This story draws from the book and recent reporting for Life Kit's guide, Parenting: Screen Time And Your Family.

Elise Potts picked up her 17-month-old daughter, Eliza, from daycare recently. When they got home they were greeted by a strange scene.

In 1969, Charles Bourland flew to Houston to interview for a food scientist position at NASA's Johnson Space Center. From his hotel's lobby, he watched with millions of Americans as Apollo astronauts took their first steps on the moon.

It was a "pretty impressive thing" to witness while considering a NASA job, he remembers with a chuckle.

How Microexpressions Can Make Moods Contagious

11 hours ago

It's a common experience for family members or groups of friends: One person's mood can bring the whole group's energy down— or up. But why are we so easily influenced?

In 1962, the reality television show Candid Camera offered a remarkable glimpse into a psychological phenomenon that helps explain how emotions spread. They did it through a now famous comedy stunt called "Face the Rear."

President Trump said he told Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven in a phone call on Saturday morning that he would "personally vouch" for the rapper A$AP Rocky's bail. Rocky has been detained in Sweden since July 3.

A Change.org petition calling for Rocky's release is gaining traction online, with over 600,000 signatures as of late Saturday afternoon.

The Trump administration is planning changes to the U.S. citizenship test. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services says it is revising the test to ensure that "it continues to serve as an accurate measure of a naturalization applicant's civics knowledge."

Updated at 11:58 p.m. ET

The U.K. Foreign Office is summoning the Iranian charge d'affaires following Iran's seizure of a British-flagged tanker in the Strait of Hormuz on Friday.

Should Republicans still call themselves the Party of Lincoln?

Kevin McCarthy, the House Republican leader, declared, "We are the party of Lincoln," as he contended President Trump was not racist for suggesting four Democratic representatives, US citizens who are also women of color, should "go back" to the places they came from.

A little over three months after Paris' Notre Dame caught fire, French officials say the cathedral is still in a precarious state and needs to be stabilized. Ultimately, they aim to restore the monument, a process that will take years.

When that work begins, there will be a new demand for experts who have the same skills required to build Notre Dame 900 years ago. In the workshops of the Hector Guimard high school, less than three miles from the cathedral, young stone carvers are training for that task.

Humans first landed on the moon 50 years ago on July 20. Former astronaut Michael Collins was a member of the historic mission.

: 7/20/19

In an early version of the audio, we incorrectly referred to the far side of the moon as the dark side of the moon.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Now, time for sports.

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It sounded like such a good idea at the time.

The year was 2005. Global oil prices were climbing dramatically. Countries in the Caribbean were facing major fuel shortages. Venezuela, one of the world's largest producers of crude, offered to ease the staggering fuel costs faced by its neighbors.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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It's been a little more than three months since Notre Dame burned. French officials say the 856-year-old cathedral is still being stabilized. When restoration work truly begins, there'll be a demand for people with the skills to rebuild the historic structure.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited a class of aspiring stone carvers and sends this report.

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California Condors Reach A Milestone Moment

Jul 20, 2019

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

It's been a little more than three months since Notre Dame burned. French officials say the 856-year-old cathedral is still being stabilized. When restoration work truly begins, there'll be a demand for people with the skills to rebuild the historic structure.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited a class of aspiring stone carvers and sends this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF STONE CHISELING)

The headlines about presidential candidate Joe Biden's new health care plan called it "a nod to the past" and "Affordable Care Act 2.0." That mostly refers to the fact that the former vice president has specifically repudiated many of his Democratic rivals' calls for a "Medicare for All" system, and instead sought to build his plan on the ACA's framework.

About 95% of 12-year-olds in the Philippines have tooth decay or cavities. And cavities affect 7 in 10 children in India, one-third of Tanzania teens and nearly 1 in every 3 Brazilians.

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats has installed a new czar to oversee election security efforts across the spy world, he announced on Friday.

A veteran agency leader, Shelby Pierson, has been appointed to serve as the first election threats executive within the intelligence community, or IC, Coats said.

"Election security is an enduring challenge and a top priority for the IC," said Coats.

Updated on July 20 at 4:11 a.m. ET

British media outlets say the government is warning ships to stay away from the area after Iran's military apparently seized the U.K.-flagged Stena Impero oil tanker as it passed through the Strait of Hormuz near Iran's coast on Friday.

It's not easy giving money to people in need.

In some countries, poor people may not have a bank account where a charity can transfer funds for financial aid. They may not have the ID — say, a birth certificate — required to cash a check at a bank.

And in an emergency situation — say, the aftermath of an earthquake — banks may not even be operating.

Could a single global digital currency — one that can be transferred through mobile phones — be a solution?

Updated at 3:37 p.m. ET

An American citizen suspected of becoming a sniper and weapons trainer for the Islamic State has been brought back to the United States and charged with aiding the terrorist group.

The charges against Ruslan Maratovich Asainov are contained in a criminal complaint unsealed Friday in federal court in the Eastern District of New York.

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