Rose Aguilar | KALW

Rose Aguilar

Host, Your Call

Rose Aguilar has been the host of Your Call since 2006. She became a regular Friday media roundtable guest in 2001. 

In 2005, Rose took a six-month road trip through the so-called 'red states' to find out why people vote the way they do (or not) and what issues they care about. Red Highways: A Journey into the Heartland chronicles her experience.

Rose has written for Al Jazeera English, Truthout, The Nation, and AlterNet. She's currently working on a book about older women activists and a new radio show focusing on investigative journalism. She is a member of the Native American Journalists Association and mentor-editor for The OpEd Project, an organization that works to increase the range of voices we hear in the media.

Before joining KALW, Rose published a newsletter about women's issues and was a reporter and weekend host for CNET Radio, where she covered technology's impact on society.  In college, she ran the TV and radio news departments and DJ'd a heavy metal show.

Rose's interests include hiking, camping, vegan living, animal rights, live music, and spending as much time underwater as possible. She volunteers for Students Rising Above, an organization that supports first generation college bound high school students.

Ways to Connect

John Locher / AP Photo

On this edition of  Your Call, we’ll discuss the recent mass shootings in Gilroy, CA, El Paso, TX, and Dayton, OH which all happened within just over a week of each other. Thirty-four people were killed and dozens more were injured. 

AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

  

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll discuss the alarming increase in the number of sick and dead marine animals washing up on California beaches.

On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with award winning journalist Lawrence Lanahan about his new book The Lines Between Us: Two Families and a Quest to Cross Baltimore’s Racial Divide.

Barbara Davidson / Getty Images


  On this edition of Your Call, we’ll speak with teachers and a teacher turned reporter about the resurgence of teachers unions and strikes in states like West Virginia, Arizona, Oklahoma, and California. 

Rennett Stowe/Flickr


On this edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss why 30 horses have died at the Santa Anita racetrack in Southern California since last December.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll be joined by Loretta Lynch, former president of the California Public Utilities Commission, the powerful state agency that regulates electric, natural gas, telecommunications, water, railroad, rail transit, and transportation companies. 

AP / Seth Wenig

  

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll have a conversation about the recycling crisis in the US. Last year, China stopped taking most foreign recyclables. Previously, 40 percent of the United States' paper, plastics, and other recyclable materials were sent to China.

Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo / AP

  

On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the historic protests in Puerto Rico which forced Governor Ricardo Rosselló to resign. They began after the publication of shocking text messages between the governor and his inner circle.

On this edition of Your Call, Alison Fogg Carlson joins us to discuss Walking in Grace: Miracles in a City of Angels, a collection of stories to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Homeboy Industries, an organization that provides education, therapy, job training, and tattoo removal services to former gang members in Los Angeles. Homeboy Industries provides a second chance at life to those who never had a first. What can we learn from former gang members who’ve gone through radical changes?

Reimagining Dementia With Dr. Tia Powell

Jul 24, 2019

  

On this edition of Your Call, Dr. Tia Powell joins us to discuss her new book, Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End. More than five million people in the US have dementia. As 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, that number will likely rise.

On this edition of Your Call, Waad al-Kateab and Edward Watts join us to discuss their award-winning documentary For Sama, a first-person perspective of the uprising in Aleppo, Syria and a love letter from a young mother to her daughter. 

NOAA photo by Rusty Brainard.

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll have a conversation with UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism students about what communities are doing to protect their environment.

Olmo Calvo / AP Photo

  

On this edition of Your Call's media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of migrants who cross the Mediterranean from war-torn Libya to Europe. Since January, more than 400 migrants have died making the perilous journey.

On this edition of Your Call, we welcome back Rachel Louise Snyder, author of No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us. We’ll discuss anti-violence programs for men, including one called Resolve to Stop the Violence, which began in a San Bruno jail. 

Gage Skidmore


On this edition of Your Call, Bay Area high school students join us to discuss issues they care about, including education, social media, politics, and more.

Richard Ladkani / Terra Mater Factual Studios

On this edition of Your Call, we'll discuss Sea of Shadows, a new documentary that follows a team of scientists, journalists, and undercover agents as they put their lives on the line to save the vaquita. There are fewer than 15 left in the Sea of Cortez. 

AP

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet series, we're discussing a new report from The Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy about the meat and dairy industries.

Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group

On this edition of Your Call’s Media Roundtable, we’ll discuss a recent report from The Guardian that found gun homicides nationwide have barely dropped, but in the Bay Area, a region scarred by inequality and gentrification, they’re down by 30 percent.

Jim Mone / AP Images

On this edition of Your Call, we discuss Amazon's labor practices. Amazon workers are planning to strike in a Minnesota fulfillment center next Monday, the first day of Prime Day, and one of Amazon’s busiest shopping days. 

IMAGE VIA NATIONAL UNION OF HEALTHCARE WORKERS

On this edition of Your Call, we speak with Kaiser Permanente's mental health workers who are striking in San Francisco today to protest worsening access to mental health care for children.  

On this edition of Your Call, neurologist and public health specialist Dr. Aysha Akhtar discusses her new book, Our Symphony With Animals: On Health, Empathy, and Our Shared Destinies, which explores the deep connection between humans and animals.

Gazilion / Wikimedia Commons

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll speak with independent journalist David Daley about the US Census and the future of partisan gerrymandering. 

  

On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll rebroadcast our conversation with Peter Nelson, director of The Pollinators, a cinematic journey around the United States that follows migratory beekeepers and their truckloads of honey bees as they pollinate the flowers that become the fruits, nuts, and vegetables we all eat. 

  On this edition of Your Call, we’ll rebroadcast our conversation with Manu Karuka, author of Empire’s Tracks

  On this edition of Your Call, Rachel Louise Snyder discusses her new book, No Visible Bruises —What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us. 

Every single minute in the US, 20 people are assaulted by their partners. Globally, 50,000 women were killed by family members in 2017, according to the UN. The same report called home, “the most dangerous place for women.” Snyder reveals how many solutions are based on false assumptions and are not protecting women. What still needs to change? 

 


On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, journalist Mark Arax will discuss his new book, The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California

On this edition of Your Call, Akemi Johnson will discuss her new book Night in the American Village: Women in the Shadow of the US Military Bases in Okinawa.

Almost 75 years since the US first occupied the Japanese island, it still has 32 military bases there.  Over 50,000 American military members, contractors, and their families live on the island. Akemi explores the wounds of US-Japanese history and the cultural and sexual politics of the US military empire. 

 

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On this edition of Your Call, filmmaker Mimi Chakarova discusses "Still I Rise," her series of short documentaries that tell the stories of people who have faced adversity. 

Cedar Attanasio / Associated Press

 


 

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss reports of deplorable conditions inside immigration detention facilities in the US. 


  On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll rebroadcast our conversation with Professor Marion Nestle, author of Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat. 

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