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Sandip Roy: Alabama

Feb 18, 2015

57 year old Sureshbhai Patel had recently arrived in the US from India to help take care of his new grandson. He went out for a walk in the suburban town in Alabama where his son lived. He ended up in hospital, partially paralysed. He was not mugged or robbed. Policemen did that to him. Patel spoke no English. 

Once there was a great hue and cry about racial profiling by law enforcement in America and it resulted in a landmark called Driving while Black. Then after 9/11 we heard about Flying while Muslim.

  

What happens when a loved one is shot and killed by law enforcement? On the February 18th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by speaking with families whose loved ones have been killed by police. We’ll find out what their experiences were like with the legal system, the media, and their local communities. What changes would they like to see? And when it comes to policies, do they feel like their voices are being heard? What questions do you have for family members? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Jan 28, 2015
Bert Johnson / East Bay Express

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Artists Create Two-Way Video Portal for Oaklanders to Meet Their Neighbors // East Bay Express

What role does implicit bias play in policing? On the January 28th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our series on police, community, race, and justice by discussing how unconscious racial bias affects police and community relations. Even those of us who believe in equality and fairness show significant patterns of bias. How are police departments dealing with this? Can officers be trained to recognize their biases and alter their behavior? What’s the most effective way to combat implicit bias? It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Cannabis News Roundup: 01.09.15

Jan 9, 2015
transmitdistort

Should marijuana be a Schedule 1 drug or not?... Home invasions linked to pot… Prices drop 40% in Washington… What Smokey says… and more.

LEGALIZATION

Looking back at 2014 drug policy successes // HuffingtonPost.com   Changes are moving California “towards drug policies that are grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights,” according to this summary by the Drug Policy Alliance.

Remembering the Millions March

Dec 29, 2014
Darren Miller

On December 13th, thousands of people came together in Oakland as part of a national movement against police brutality. KALW producer Daniel Moore and photographer Darren Miller were there and made this audio slideshow to recognize the event.

Cannabis News Roundup: 12.26.14

Dec 26, 2014
transmitdistort

What does new federal drug policy mean for those already charged?... Illinois medical marijuana OK for kids… John Lennon’s role in popularizing marijuana… and more…

LEGALIZATION

On the November 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call:  Monday night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri had decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of unarmed black youth Michael Brown led to outrage and protest nationwide.  President Obama and Michael Brown's parents called for peaceful protest -- but what does that mean, and how far should it go?  What will keep the focus on continued racial inequities in policing?  And how does the story of Ferguson resonate in the Bay Area and Northern California? 

Sandhya Dirks

For the past eight years, one weekend in late summer brings first responders from across the country and around the world -- firemen, medics, SWAT teams and police officers --  to Alameda County for Urban Shield, one of the largest law enforcement training exercises in the country.

Whether for counterterrorism measures, street level crime, or immigration, racial profiling of minorities occurs frequently. However, racial profiling is illegal under many jurisdictions and many might say ineffective. Is racial profiling ever moral or is it always an unjustified form of racism? Is there any evidence that certain races or ethnic groups have a tendency to behave in particular ways? Or is racial stereotyping a result of deeply-held biases we're not even aware of?

Tonny Villarreal

Note: This article contains language some readers may find offensive.

Usually, people who emerge from the 16th Street BART Station in San Francisco are greeted by men and women slumped over shopping carts, by panhandlers, and by the cacophony of traffic. But late on Thursday nights, BART passengers stride into the sounds of poetry. For over a decade, poets, musicians, and comedians have been meeting outside the station.

  

On the August 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the militarization of police forces across the country. According to a recent ACLU report, last year, the Department of Homeland Security pumped $1 billion into local law enforcement, while the Department of Defense supplied another $449 million worth of equipment for police forces.  Why are police so heavily armed? And how is this playing out in places like Ferguson, Missouri?  Join the conversation on Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Lisa Carmack

Tuesday night was the 31st year of National Night Out, an event that aims to help prevent crime by encouraging people get to know their neighbors and strengthen their communities. We sent reporters out to National Night Out gatherings all over the Bay Area to see what was going on.

East Bay Express: Back in the closet

Apr 30, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Cannabis News Roundup: 03.14.14

Mar 14, 2014
transmitdistort.deviantart.com

Attorney General & UN critical of drug sentencing… Brown’s “pothead” comment rebuffed… More positive news for CBD treatments… Book event in Oakland… and more

COPS & COURTS

“Over reliance on incarceration is unsustainable” in drug sentencing: Attny. Gen’l. Holder // NYT

Cannabis News Roundup: February 7, 2014

Feb 7, 2014
transmitdistort.deviantart.com

Police say they’ll regulate since Assembly won’t… Congressional committee reviews cannabis policy… Dhar Mann sentenced in Oakland… Mendo sheriff to arrest water thieves at illegal grow sites… Bieber “pot plane”… and more.

COPS & COURTS

Cannabis News Roundup: November 29, 2013

Nov 29, 2013
Portable Network Graphics

East Bay Congressional members tell US Attorney to back off… Mountie kicked out for smoking medical pot… Consultant pessimistic about Washington state’s legalization experiment… Peter (“better than scotch”) Lewis dies… and more.

LEGALIZATION

For the better part of two decades, Oakland residents have often objected to the city's process for taking complaints about police officers. Under the city's system, residents who want to make a complaint against a particular officer must make that complaint to a uniformed cop working for OPD's Internal Affairs Division. For some, the setup was intimidating, and it also bred cynicism because internal affairs routinely dismissed most of the complaints.

Kyung Jin Lee

West Oakland’s Alex Miller-Cole has decided that he can’t depend on the police for help.

“Mead Avenue was the second worst street in all of Oakland,” he says. “All the neighbors have been mulching. We planted 75 trees. Now it’s the cleanest street ever. Nothing happens here now.”

Under CC license from Flickr user vision63

The last decade has seen more than a hundred officer-involved shootings – 39 of them fatal. When one of those shootings happens, OPD’s Internal Affairs division automatically investigates. But these investigations have been widely criticized.

Under CC license from Flickr user allaboutgeorge

The top brass of the Oakland Police department looks a lot different than it did a month ago. In just one week in May, two police chiefs resigned: former chief Howard Jordan, then his successor, Anthony Toribio.

The departures followed several highly critical reports: one by an independent consultant, the other by the department’s court-appointed overseer. Both find that years after the landmark police abuse scandal known as the Riders case, the department is still struggling with leadership, accountability, and transparency.


A Conversation with SF Police Chief Greg Suhr

Dec 19, 2012

Host Joseph Pace speaks with San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr.  Is violent crime on the rise in San Francisco?  How does crime in different neighborhoods compare?  Are the SFPD's tools, such as the "Bat Computer," making streets safer?  Hear Chief Suhr discuss the challenges and successes of the SFPD.

EastBayExpress.com

In January of 2011, 38-year-old Lamar Deshea Moore walked into the Detroit Police Department's sixth precinct and opened fire. Two officers were hit in the head with shrapnel, a commander was shot in the back, and a fourth officer was shot in the chest, although a bulletproof vest saved her from serious injury. "As you can imagine, utter chaos and pandemonium took place," Detroit Police Chief Ralph Godbee Jr. said at the time.

The California Department of Health has issued a scathing report about a board-and-care home for people with disabilities in Sonoma County.

The Sonoma Developmental Center houses about 500 patients in the city of Eldridge. California Watch obtained a copy of the nearly 500 page document which details numerous citations of neglect and abuse by staff, including sexual abuse and violence, as well as lack of action on these cases by on-site law enforcement.

Ali Winston

Of the 2,000 people who initially applied for the 55 new positions on the Oakland Police force, most were from outside the city. In fact, more than 90% of the current police force does not live in Oakland, something that activists say strains community police relations and affects city resources. Oakland spends about 40% of its general fund on police – that compares with 26% spent on police in San Jose, 17% in Sacramento and 7% in Long Beach. 

Kyung Jin Lee

When the Oakland Police Department put out a call for new recruits earlier this year, more than 2,000 people applied – mostly from outside of Oakland. The applicants live in cities in the outer East Bay and in San Francisco, but they also hail from as far away as Illinois and Florida.

Flickr user alxndr

Throughout the 1990s and into the early 2000s, two things shaped the Oakland Police Department.  The city had one of the highest crime rates in California, and four police officers calling themselves the “Riders” beat, robbed, and framed hundreds of residents in the flatlands of Oakland. For years the officers were praised for sweeping drugs from the rough streets of West Oakland. But in 2000 over 100 plaintiffs came forward and accused the “Riders” of kidnapping, false imprisonment, assault with a deadly weapon, and battery.

To pay old pension debt, Oakland weighs bet on future

Jun 20, 2012

In a recent press conference, Mayor Jean Quan touted Oakland's balanced budget.

“I’m pleased to say that today we are not making any major cuts to any program,” she said. “We are not laying anybody off. In fact we are making a few modest increases.”

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