Angela Johnston | KALW

Angela Johnston

Angela Johnston

Residents at the Westwinds Mobile Home Park in San Jose started this decade off with an unsettling surprise.

Angela Johnston

 

For many people in the Bay Area, the holidays aren’t complete without a big meal of fresh Dungeness crab. The commercial season was supposed to begin on November 15th, just in time for Thanksgiving. But this year, fishermen had to wait a month to set their traps.

Daniel Parks, Flickr Creative Commons CC BY-NC 2.0

Last month, more than 100 people crowded into a library for a public meeting in Pinole, a tiny city North East of Richmond. They were there to fight a proposal to dredge the shipping canal in the Bay.

Béatrice Karjalainen. Flickr Creative Commons. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Last month, the Bay Area got a taste of what our new fire season could look like. Big fires, and big blackouts. And it’s not over yet.

Angela Johnston / KALW

In 2000, San Francisco passed what was considered a highly progressive public finance system for city elections. But since that time, analysts say that San Francisco has fallen far behind other major U.S. cities.

Tom Levy

Architecture has the power to transform. A building can make us feel joy or sadness, powerful or weak. 

Angela Johnston


 

In his backyard in San Francisco’s Outer Richmond neighborhood, Arne Jin An Wong coats a pink and white striped, eight-foot-long surfboard. This is one of dozens in Wong’s quiver.

Angela Johnston / KALW News

Every summer fish biologists across the state suction snorkel masks onto their faces. With scuba diving flashlights in hand, they crawl, swim, and slither up the tributaries of rivers literally counting the number and species of salmon they see to measure the health of the population. This method to monitor the salmon and steelhead populations is effective and low tech and it hasn’t changed much over the years. But the salmon population in California has changed.

Before lawmakers left on vacation last week, Governor Gavin Newsom introduced and signed into law a new plan for California wildfires. The law creates a fund to pay for damages from wildfires — specifically, ones caused by utilities.

Angela Johnston / KALW

The San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission or the BCDC was established in the mid-1960s to regulate development, prevent the destruction of wetlands, and ensure public access to San Francisco Bay. It's an organization that usually doesn’t get much attention, but now it’s being widely criticized for neglecting its responsibilities to protect the Bay.

Angela Johnston

 


When you’re driving down the coast on Highway 1 toward Monterey, you may miss the exit for the tiny city of Marina. It’s often overshadowed by its neighbors: Monterey with the aquarium and Cannery Row, Carmel by the Sea. But if you take that exit, you’ll pass a Walmart, some fast food chains, and row of hotels. What makes the city stand out is it’s dozens of beach trails.

Flickr Stuart Rankin (CC BY-NC 2.0)

 

It’s been almost half a year since the Camp Fire in Northern California burned through thousands of homes, destroying the town of Paradise, and killing 85 people.

Almost everyone who flies into San Francisco or San Jose airport has seen it -- a vibrant patchwork quilt of colorful water. There, on the southern edge of the San Francisco Bay, you can see bright pinks, pumpkin oranges, neon greens and deep magentas, contrasted against the dark blues of the natural bay water. The last time KALW listener Donna Staton peered out an airplane window, she saw it, too.

 

Lars Hammers (CC BY-NC-2.0)

Five Bay Area counties have won millions of dollars in a lead paint lawsuit, but now they say, paint companies are doing everything they can to prevent them from getting it.

Flickr user bgwashburn CC BY 2.0

It’s official — El Nino has arrived. Even though this week we’re finally seeing some sunnier weather, it’s been rainy! Atmospheric rivers in the sky! So, what's the result?

Alan Joyce CC BY-NC 2.0

 

This week Gavin Newsom was sworn in as California’s 40th Governor, following Jerry Brown’s second eight-year tenure.

Marissa Ortega-Welch/KALW

This is the first in a four-part award-winning series “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area.”

A 2017 Reuters report showed that a few Bay Area neighborhoods have some of the highest rates of childhood lead poisoning in the country.

Angela Johnston

 

This is the second story in our four-part award-winning series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the Bay Area.

Courtesy of John Bauters

This is part of our series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the region.

Marissa Ortega-Welch

 

This is the third story in our four-part series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the Bay Area.

The numbers show the lead poisoning problem in the Bay Area is bad — but is what we know just the tip of the iceberg?

Angela Johnston

 

This is the last story in our four-part series “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area.” 

In Alameda County, which has some of the highest lead levels in the country, an energetic public health nurse helps families after their child has been lead poisoned. But her work is a stopgap solution. What’s the answer to preventing leading poisoning before it starts?

This is the first story in our four-part award-winning series “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area.

A 2017 Reuters report showed that a few Bay Area neighborhoods have some of the highest rates of childhood lead poisoning in the country.

Flickr user GPS, used under CC BY-SA 2.0

We know now that Democrats dominated in California. And, we're antipating many changes at local and statewide levels. To break it down, KALW’s election coordinator, Angela Johnston, and news director, Ben Trefny, talk about what’s new.

Angela Johnston

The Camp Fire in Northern California is now the deadliest and most destructive fire in California history. For most Californians, this milestone is starting to sound all too familiar.

Eli Wirschafter

 

It’s a new day. Republicans no longer control all three branches of the federal government, and there’s no doubt that makes the vast majority of registered voters in the state of California happy. Our team here at KALW was up late covering the election live. KALW election coordinator Angela Johnston and news director Ben Trefny help us sift through some of the results.

 

cott Beale / Laughing Squid

 

It’s finally come. Today is the Election Day! Many people are saying it’s the most important election of our lifetimes. At the very least, it’s the most important election since, well, since the last one.

Angela Johnston

 

What’s a piece of functioning San Francisco infrastructure that’s over a hundred years old? The Golden Gate Bridge? The sewer system? Nope! It’s the Embarcadero Seawall.

Jeff Turner / Flickr Creative Commons

 


Angela Johnston

One of the most immediate threats to California’s water and agriculture infrastructure may not be a future drought. It may not be the big twin tunnels project, either. Right now, it's a huge, 20-pound swamp rat with bright yellow teeth — nutria.

Courtesy of filmmakers Quinn Costello, Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer


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