Angela Johnston | KALW

Angela Johnston

Angela Johnston

I visit the bottom floor of the Alisal Health Center in East Salinas in February. It’s home to the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program, where new parents on Medi-Cal can get prenatal or postpartum care. 

Angela Johnston

This summer, farmworkers in California have been working with extreme heat, wildfire smoke, and, in Monterey County, high rates of COVID-19 as they harvest and pick the food we eat every day. Then, there’s another health concern, and it’s been around for much longer — pesticide exposure.

Angela Johnston / KALW

In Salinas, if you make a run to the grocery store to pick up a bag of kale, you’ll probably pass rows and rows of the leafy green.

Courtesy of UCSF / Adobe Stock

Like many people, back in April, Christin New needed something to look forward to. Not only was a pandemic spreading around the word, she’d just had a miscarriage. So when she and her husband found out they were expecting, they were overjoyed. 

Angela Johnston

2020 has been a historically tense year. We’ve got a pandemic that won’t end, the biggest mass protests in American history, a divisive presidential election coming, and, by the way, global temperature rise is rapidly approaching the point of no return. It’s a frightening thought. What was true before COVID-19 is even truer now: When we try to think and talk about climate change, it’s normal to become overwhelmed. This week, we're bringing you a series about the emotional and physical impacts of climate change. And we begin with a story about sea-level rise.

Flickr user The National Guard (CC BY 2.0)

By now, over four months into the shelter-in-place ordinance, you’ve probably swapped testing stories — or been on a Zoom call featuring questions such as: How did you get an appointment? Did it hurt? How long to get the test results?

Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group

 

This week the Bay Area entered its fourth month of shelter-in-place. And it's a confusing time: infection rates are climbing in some counties, just as local resturants are welcoming back diners.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

Nearly three months into shelter-in-place, society is beginning to reopen. People are heading outside. For some it’s to restaurants or back to work. Many are joining the anti-racism protests that began over two weeks ago. And change is happening - in communities, and in government.

For the past 11 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times.  This week, many have started leaving their homes to protest another pandemic. 

Bay Area Headlines: Tuesday, 6/2/20, PM

Jun 2, 2020

Peaceful Protest Marred By Oakland Police Department Response / Bay Area Officials Press Ahead With Police Reform 

Ep. 10 - I Have A Bucket

May 29, 2020

For the past 10 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a family questioning their memorial day trip down the coast, a potter who gets a positive test, and a mother afraid to send her kid back to school. It's Day By Day: KALW's Quarantine Diaries.

For the past nine weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a senior who sings, a teacher on his last day of class, and a bookseller happy to see regulars again.  It’s Day By Day: KALW’s Quarantine Diaries.

For the past eight weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from an 88-year-old poet, an unemployed potter, and a frustrated restaurant owner.

Courtesy of St. Anthony's

The city is opening its first so-called “safe-sleeping-site" nearly eight weeks after Mayor London Breed announced San Francisco’s shelter-in-place ordinance. It’s between the Asian Art Museum and the main library, right in front of City Hall.

While local and state leaders are preparing for the next phase, we’re all still grappling with the way the pandemic has changed our day-to-day lives. For the past seven weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear about new loves, dashed dreams, and the competitive spirit of an 8-year-old Uno champ. 

While local and state leaders are preparing for the next phase, we’re all still grappling with the way the pandemic has changed our day-to-day lives. For the past seven weeks, we’ve been checking in daily with folks from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. Today, we’ll hear about new loves, dashed dreams, and the competitive spirit of an 8-year-old Uno champ. It's the Quarantine Diaries.

Gabe Grabin / KALW

Most Bay Area residents are passing their sixth week of shelter-in-place. We’ll hear from a diverse group of locals, including a real estate broker, a new mom, and a funeral director. It’s Day By Day: Quarantine Diaries.

It’s been 38 days since the shelter-in-place order went into effect in the region. Since then, we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay, including a teacher, a restaurant owner, an artist, a grocery store worker, a nurse, and a ten-year-old. 

Angela Johnston / KALW

It’s been a month since health officials across the Bay Area ordered residents to shelter in place. Since then, we have been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay to see how the pandemic is affecting our lives. This week, we will hear from a public defender, a high school student, a new parent and a single parent, a delivery driver and more.

Sheltering SF's Unhoused People / San Francisco Pride Canceled

Sheltering SF's Unhoused People 

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved an emergency ordinance that requires the city to secure over 8,000 hotel rooms in the next two weeks to help people shelter-in-place. Most of those rooms are for people experiencing homelessness. 

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

It’s been 24 days since the shelter-in-place order went into effect in the region. Since then we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay, including a teacher, a restaurant owner, an artist, a grocery store worker, a nurse, and a 10 year-old.

Flickr user Euan / Creative Commons, used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The Bay Area has been applauded for its response to the coronavirus. Early shelter-in-place guidelines were put into place and experts say the curve is beginning to flatten. But there are big hurdles ahead.

Shereen Adel / KALW

It’s been just a little over two weeks since the Bay Area’s shelter-in-place policy took effect. And it has dramatically changed how most of us live and work. Hear from people all around the Bay Area about daily life during the coronavirus epidemic.

Coronavirus Testing Data / Cases Increase For Healthcare Workers / Campuses Closed For Academic Year

Shereen Adel / KALW

For those who have lost their income because of COVID-19, today may be an especially hard day. It’s April 1, and for many, rent is due. Bay Area governments have passed emergency protections for tenants, but critics say they’re not enough.

Coronavirus Caseload / Rent Moratoriums

Photo by Jenny G. Shao / KALW

 

On March 17, leaders from six Bay Area counties announced a shelter-in-place policy that’s closed all but essential businesses and confined most people to their homes. Since then, we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay. Together, this group sketches out how the coronavirus epidemic is already changing how we live and work.

 

Latest coronoavirus tally / Mortgage relief / School closure extension / Immigration detention

Sona Avakian / KALW

 


Last night Governor Gavin Newsom gave a speech on Facebook. He told Californians he would be extending our restrictions here in the Bay Area, to the entire state. 

Flickr user Tony Wasserman

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The number of COVID-19 cases, and it varies county by county. As of the time of publishing, there are 14 confirmed cases in San Francisco. Santa Clara County has 45 cases, Alameda County is confirming three cases, but the numbers are constantly changing.

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