Lauren Schiller | KALW

Lauren Schiller

Host, Inflection Point

 

Lauren Schiller is the creator and host of Inflection Point, a nationally syndicated weekly public radio show and podcast about how women rise up.

She comes by these conversations honestly: She was born into a long line of strong women role models who worked in business, arts, media, education and labor organizing. In the ’70s Lauren's mom took her to the march on Washington, D.C. in support of the Equal Rights Amendment. In the ’80s she was one of the first girls to join the Boys Club in Pittsburgh, PA (now Boys & Girls Club).

While getting her BA in Political Science from Vassar College, Lauren interned at a news radio station in Poughkeepsie reporting on local arts. After graduation a trip to Telluride, CO turned into a job at the Sheridan Opera House managing celebrities. She then went on to work for Chiat/Day New York, one of the world's most creative advertising agencies. Adopting their slogan “good enough is not enough” as her personal mantra, Lauren moved to the Bay Area and rose to the highest ranks of the industry to become the second female partner in her San Francisco ad firm. Lauren returned to her love of broadcasting when she created one of the first female-led podcasts in 2008, a show which ran for five years and was also syndicated on commercial radio and Comcast TV.

Lauren partnered with KALW to produce Inflection Point in 2015 and launched it during Women’s History Month. She created the program to share stories and insights we can apply to our own lives, and she created it for her daughters.

 

Ways to Connect

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Turn off, and turn on!

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When Eve Rodsky found herself sobbing on the side of the road over a text about blueberries, she knew something had to change. 

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Isha Clarke is an activist with Youth vs Apocalypse. You may know her from a viral video where she asked Senator Dianne Feinstein to move the Green New Deal forward; she helped organize the youth Climate Strike in San Francisco that attracted 30,000 students, during the international "week of action" when Greta Thurnberg sailed to America. She is a high school student working every day to reverse the climate crisis because as she says..." we have this power and responsibility to make this radical change.

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Candace Bushnell gave us a reason to sit on our couch every week to soak in the stories of the women--and men--of the 90s television culture-changer "Sex and the City". Candace has written a number of books since then and her newest book is called "Is There Still Sex in the City?" This October I teamed up with Women Lit of the Bay Area Book Festival to have an on-stage conversation with Candace Bushnell, hosted by INFORUM at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco.

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We're hearing more from and about American extremist groups lately, like white supremacists and Incels. One thing their members have in common is misogyny. Today's guest is Jessica Reeves, the Editorial Director at the Center on Extremism at the Anti-Defamation League. She and her team monitor extremists across the ideological spectrum. In today's episode you'll hear what she's learned about these groups, why she thinks misogyny should be treated as another form of extremism, and how we can put a stop to it.

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There have been over 200 mass shootings in this country since 2009. Shannon Watts, the author of a new book: Fight Like a Mother, is the founder of Moms Demand Action, 

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This week on Inflection Point, I talk with Eve Ensler, award-winning playwright of The Vagina Monologues, about her new book “The Apology”,

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America is one of only two countries in the world where you can be fired for taking a day off in order to give birth (let that sink in for a moment).

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In 19th Century San Francisco's Chinatown only 1 in 10 people were women, and most of them were forced into prostitution, trafficked by criminal tongs. 

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This week, we hear about a radical plan to end poverty: Universal Basic Income. 

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Speaking the truth, calling it like it is, using your voice---being authentic are all hallmarks of the feminist movement. But the more we speak the truth, the more we risk a backlash. 

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In the post-MeToo era, men who would never consider saying a harassing word or venture a grope are now asking themselves “can I hug a co-worker anymore?” 

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Times like these call for radical ideas. But is being a radical a positive thing? And if so, why are so many radicals seen as dangerous?

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This special episode features a live conversation with activist, writer and feminist organizer, Gloria Steinem and Oakland-based artist and activist Favianna Rodriguez. 

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We can all be radical geniuses by embracing a mindset of flexibility and resilience.

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Fox News has paid out hundreds of millions of dollars to silence women who were sexually harassed and assaulted while working there. 

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What’s going on with men? Can masculinity exist without its more toxic forms? 

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Are you anxious? Here's why.

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The myth of empowerment.

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What if our reliance on search engines is perpetuating oppressive ideas and hateful ideologies--even swaying elections?

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Will the powers that be yield to the kind of change women politicians will bring to office?

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What does it actually take for women to win elections? 

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Organizational psychologist Dr. Barbara Adams says there is transformational power for everyone in diversity and inclusivity. 

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Can an all-woman board move beyond empowerment, and get to actual power?

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Despite our differences, we can find connections that bring us together.

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