Lauren Schiller | KALW

Lauren Schiller

Host, Inflection Point

 

Lauren Schiller is the creator and host of Inflection Point, a nationally syndicated weekly public radio show and podcast about how women rise up.

She comes by these conversations honestly: She was born into a long line of strong women role models who worked in business, arts, media, education and labor organizing. In the ’70s Lauren's mom took her to the march on Washington, D.C. in support of the Equal Rights Amendment. In the ’80s she was one of the first girls to join the Boys Club in Pittsburgh, PA (now Boys & Girls Club).

While getting her BA in Political Science from Vassar College, Lauren interned at a news radio station in Poughkeepsie reporting on local arts. After graduation a trip to Telluride, CO turned into a job at the Sheridan Opera House managing celebrities. She then went on to work for Chiat/Day New York, one of the world's most creative advertising agencies. Adopting their slogan “good enough is not enough” as her personal mantra, Lauren moved to the Bay Area and rose to the highest ranks of the industry to become the second female partner in her San Francisco ad firm. Lauren returned to her love of broadcasting when she created one of the first female-led podcasts in 2008, a show which ran for five years and was also syndicated on commercial radio and Comcast TV.

Lauren partnered with KALW to produce Inflection Point in 2015 and launched it during Women’s History Month. She created the program to share stories and insights we can apply to our own lives, and she created it for her daughters.

 

Ways to Connect

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America is one of only two countries in the world where you can be fired for taking a day off in order to give birth (let that sink in for a moment).

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In 19th Century San Francisco's Chinatown only 1 in 10 people were women, and most of them were forced into prostitution, trafficked by criminal tongs. 

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This week, we hear about a radical plan to end poverty: Universal Basic Income. 

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Speaking the truth, calling it like it is, using your voice---being authentic are all hallmarks of the feminist movement. But the more we speak the truth, the more we risk a backlash. 

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In the post-MeToo era, men who would never consider saying a harassing word or venture a grope are now asking themselves “can I hug a co-worker anymore?” 

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Times like these call for radical ideas. But is being a radical a positive thing? And if so, why are so many radicals seen as dangerous?

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This special episode features a live conversation with activist, writer and feminist organizer, Gloria Steinem and Oakland-based artist and activist Favianna Rodriguez. 

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We can all be radical geniuses by embracing a mindset of flexibility and resilience.

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Fox News has paid out hundreds of millions of dollars to silence women who were sexually harassed and assaulted while working there. 

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What’s going on with men? Can masculinity exist without its more toxic forms? 

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Are you anxious? Here's why.

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The myth of empowerment.

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What if our reliance on search engines is perpetuating oppressive ideas and hateful ideologies--even swaying elections?

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Will the powers that be yield to the kind of change women politicians will bring to office?

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What does it actually take for women to win elections? 

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Organizational psychologist Dr. Barbara Adams says there is transformational power for everyone in diversity and inclusivity. 

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Can an all-woman board move beyond empowerment, and get to actual power?

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Despite our differences, we can find connections that bring us together.

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What happens when teachers are given the freedom to inspire a lifelong love of learning? 

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At age 35, Stitch Fix founder Katrina Lake became the youngest female founder and CEO to take a company public in 2017. 

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When radio journalist Sarah Delia heard a story about the sexual assault of one of her listeners, “Linda” (not her real name), she knew it was a story that needed to be told. 

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Can you find compassion in your heart for the haters in your life? 

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"A lot of young girls are often taught to sort of stay quiet or to put other people's needs before ourselves... And if we are to speak up or to stand up for ourselves it could be taken as being bossy or the other b word." - Emily Abad, Director of Programs at The Mosaic Project, an experiential education program addressing issues of diversity, empathy, and conflict resolution.

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Sarah McBride made history as the first transgender person to speak at a national political convention in 2016. 

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For the past decade 96-year-old Betty Reid Soskin has served as the nation’s oldest Park Ranger 

Daniela Petruzalek has made it her mission to make the white cisgender male dominated tech industry truly inclusive.

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