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justice

Philosophy Talk: White Privilege and Racial Injustice

Oct 5, 2018

Is it a privilege or a right to be treated as you deserve to be?


Police, Justice and Community

Aug 22, 2018

  Your Legal Rights host Jeff Hayden welcomes John L Burris and Carlos Bolanos for a discussion about inclusiveness and community.  With law offices in Oakland (johnburrislaw.com) Mr Burris, known as  is both a civil rights activist and police misconduct lawyer, is active in the community as well as in the courtroom.  San Mateo County Sheriff Carlos Bolanos has previously served as Chief of the Redwood City Police Department, after serving the cities of Palo Alto and Salinas; he is also active in the Rotary Club and in the Redwood City and San Mateo County communities. Questions for John an

Philosophy Talk: The Ethics of Algorithms

Aug 14, 2018

Can algorithms be truly objective decision-makers, or do they necessarily pick up the biases of their human programmers?


 

Back in 2016, Santa Clara County Superior Court judge Aaron Persky sentenced Stanford swimmer Brock Turner to six months behind bars for raping an unconscious woman. The case sparked international outrage.  

Holly McDede

When Stanford student Brock Turner was sentenced to six months in prison for sexual assault back in 2016, lots of people thought he deserved a longer sentence. They saw a white, college athlete let off the hook.

 

Handout / Wikimedia Commons

California has seen some notorious serial killers over the years, including the Zodiac Killer, the Grim Sleeper, and the Hillside Strangler. But the Golden State Killer might be the most terrifying. 

Should there be limits to violence in the service of liberation?


Philosophy Talk: The Fairness Fixation

Jul 22, 2017

Should all social arrangements really aim to be fair and just?

  

Philosophy Talk: Racial Profiling and Implicit Bias

Jun 27, 2017

Is it human nature to react to new objects on the basis of visible traits and past experiences?


Philosophy Talk: Philosophy behind bars

Feb 14, 2017

What is it like to teach philosophy in prison? What is it like to study philosophy while in prison?


Philosophy Talk: Reparations

Feb 4, 2017
"Guyana" by CjimB used under CC license

Should any person or institution who has benefited from our sorry history of racism be required to compensate the victims of racism?


Philosophy Talk: Tainted by the sins of our fathers?

Jan 31, 2017

Should we feel guilt about wrongs committed by ancestors we never even knew?


Philosophy Talk asks about the value of private philanthropy

Jun 17, 2016

What happens when philanthropy by the wealthy becomes a substitute for democratically-controlled government action?


Does affirmative action undermine the achievements of those who are supposed to benefit from it?

 On the March 9th edition of Your Call, we'll examine the history of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge regime. 

Philosophy Talk asks about life and death in prison

Jan 12, 2016

What rights should convicted felons be expected to forfeit before prison becomes cruel and unusual punishment?


Philosophy Talk asks about perception, memory, and justice

Nov 27, 2015

What do Descartes and Perry Mason have in common? They both distrust eyewitness testimony.  

  One hot muggy afternoon last week I was at the city office in Kolkata trying to figure out a property tax bill.  After two and a half hours of running from pillar to post, counter to counter, waiting on one official or the other, I understood first hand a fact of life in India – the system never works for you unless you know someone with connections who can, as they say, "manage it for you." But as I was sitting in that office I heard a piece of news that restored my faith...

The number of chronically hungry people in the world is over 800 million, yet developed countries are facing health challenges from rising rates of obesity. The growing problems of food security and water scarcity seem an issue of distribution rather than availability. But other factors also influence the status of food and water security worldwide. So where does the problem with food and water security lie? Do developed countries – or any other entities or individuals – have any moral obligations to ensure a global network of water and food security?

The unexamined year is not worth reviewing:

The Year in Race and Justice with Chris Lebron, Professor of African-American Studies at Yale University and author of The Color Of Our Shame: Race and Justice In Our Time

The Year in Academic Freedom with Katherine Franke, Professor of Law at Columbia University and Director of the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law

On January 1st,  2015 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Bryan Stevenson, author of “Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption” and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative. One in every 15 people in the United States is expected to go to jail or prison, and for  black men, the number increases to one in three. How can we generate empathy both for people who have committed crimes and compassion for victims? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guest:

Recent advances in neuroscience have revealed that certain neurological disorders, like a brain tumor, can cause an otherwise normal person to behave in criminally deviant ways. Would knowing that an underlying neurological condition had caused criminal behavior change the way we assign moral responsibility and mete out justice? Should it? Is committing a crime with a "normal" biology fundamentally different from doing so with an identifiable brain disorder?

Your Call: Is the bail bond system broken?

May 28, 2014