Hannah Hagemann | KALW

Hannah Hagemann

Hannah Hagemann is a 2019 Kroc Fellow. During her fellowship, she will work at NPR's National Desk and Weekend Edition.

She comes to NPR from the Bay Area, where she earned a master's in science journalism from UC Santa Cruz and reported for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco.

In July 2019, Hannah was one of the first reporters on the ground covering the mass shooting in Gilroy, California. Hagemann enjoys reporting stories at the intersection of community, policy and science. She has reported on climate change, fishing issues and PFAS chemicals.

Before beginning a career in journalism, Hagemann worked as a geologist. She sampled and cleaned up industrial pollution across California with drill crews, railroad foremen and high-level regulators. The work brought Hagemann to remote corners of the Mojave and sprawling air force bases, but most often she was investigating contamination in working-class communities across Los Angeles.

In her free time, Hagemann enjoys hiking, skiing, mountain biking and seeing live bluegrass and funk music. She also paints landscapes and writes poetry.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

The Ruby Princess cruise ship docked in Sydney on March 19 and nearly 2,700 passengers who were on board left freely, though some exhibited flu-like symptoms. On Sunday, Australian police announced they've launched a criminal investigation into the Ruby Princess, citing questions over whether the operators of the ship, Carnival Australia, were transparent about sickened passengers and crew members.

Pope Francis was the sole celebrant at Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the commencement of Holy Week, and the service took place without a congregation, which the Vatican press office said was a historic first for the Roman Catholic Church.

Almost exactly 100 years ago, one-third of the world's population found itself infected in a deadly viral pandemic. It was the Spanish flu. Its death toll is unknown but is generally considerd to be more than 50 million.

"The death rate in 1918 was very high ... somewhere between 2 and 2 1/2%," Nancy Bristow, a history professor at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash., told NPR.

Some reseachers have estimated a death rate as high as 10 to 20%.

In recent weeks doctors and nurses have reported dire shortages of protective gear; on the Cape Cod peninsula in Massachusetts, and in the San Francisco Bay Area, hospital workers say they're being forced to reuse N-95 masks. In New York, the current epicenter of the U.S.

Commercial fishermen in the U.S. who have already faced challenges in recent years to make it in an increasingly globalized and regulated industry, are now struggling to find customers during the coronavirus crisis.

"This is totally unprecedented. This is the biggest crisis to hit the fishing industry ever, no question about that," Noah Oppenheim, executive director of The Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations told NPR in a phone interview. The federation is a trade association representing commercial fishermen along the West Coast.

A 31-year-old immigrant who is detained in a New Jersey jail by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. It is the first confirmed coronavirus case among ICE detainees. A guard at the Bergen County Jail where the man is held, also tested positive for coronavirus last week.

Eli Bundy, a 15-year-old sophomore at Charleston County School of the Arts in South Carolina, knows how it feels to be ignored in the classroom. In South Carolina, it's illegal for teachers to address queer relationships, unless they're talking about sexually transmitted infections, also called STIs.

Eli, who identifies as queer, says they and their classmates have broached the subject of non-heterosexual relationships in health classes, but that their questions go unanswered.

Lore had it that the SS Cotopaxi was swallowed by the infamous Bermuda Triangle after the steamship, and all 32 crew members on board, inexplicably vanished in 1925.

In the sci-fi film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, aliens are responsible for the ship's disappearance.

But a team of divers has identified the ship and debunked the fictions, theories and conspiracies that emerged over the years. And unlike in Close Encounters, the ship wasn't found in the Gobi desert, but rather 35 miles off St. Augustine in Florida.

Hemp farming exploded after the 2018 Farm Bill passed last December. The bill decriminalized the plant at the federal level, opening the door for many U.S. farmers to grow and sell hemp.

Over the past year, licensed hemp acreage increased more than 445%, according to the advocacy and research group Vote Hemp. More than 510,000 acres of hemp were licensed in 2019, versus about 112,000 acres in 2018.

Updated at 8:06 p.m. ET

The electric car industry is expanding, and at least one business owner is capitalizing on that growth. RS Automotive — the first U.S. gas station fully converted to an electric vehicle-charging station — opened a month ago in Takoma Park, Md.

A brand new blue and white sign reads EV charging, replacing where the dollar and cents gas price listings stood. From afar, the station's electric chargers don't look too different from their predecessors. Some drivers still think they can still fill up their gas tanks here.