Lisa Morehouse | KALW

Lisa Morehouse

News editor

Book tours have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from San Francisco’s Jaimal Yogis reading from his new children’s picture book, "Mop Rides the Waves of Life."

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one features San Francisco author Anne Raeff reading from her new book, "Only the River."

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one features Berkeley’s Johanna Silver, the former garden editor of Sunset Magazine whose book Growing Weed in the Garden came out in March. 

Photo by Andria Lo

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one features Oakland-based author Monica Sok reading from her new book of poetry, "A Nail the Evening Hangs On."

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. Today, we're featuring San Anselmo-based author Kate Milliken reading from her  new novel, "Kept Animals."

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. Today, we're featuring Oakland author Melanie Abrams reading from her new book, "Meadowlark."

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. Today, we're featuring Oakland author Adrien Aster reading from their new dystopian sci-fi thriller, "Loving R-thur."

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Katie Flynn reading from her new novel, "The Companions."

Rebeka Rodriguez / Feminist Press

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Juli Delgado Lopera reading from her bilingual, coming of age novel "Fiebre Tropical."

While we're sheltered-in-place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Beth Lisick reading from her new novel, "Edie on the Green Screen."

Courtesy of Cara Black

Book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing Bay Area readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Cara Black reading from her new book, "Three Hours in Paris."

Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author C Pam reading from her new novel, "How Much of These Hills Is Gold."

Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Marilyn Chase reading from her new book "Everything She Touched: The Life of Ruth Asawa." 

Dennis Hearne

Many Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing books to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Alia Voltz. Listen to a documentary on the story behind her new book, "Home Baked," here.

Courtesy of Meridy Volz

The coronavirus is on all of our minds, and for some, it brings back memories of another public health crisis, when the federal government was slow to respond and communities had to take care of each other: the AIDS epidemic.

Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Wendy Liu reading from her new book "Abolish Silicon Valley." 

Lynsay Skiba / Algoquin Books

While we're sheltered-in-place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today's reading is from "Why We Swim" by Berkeley author Bonnie Tsui.

Many Bay Area authors with spring book release dates have had to cancel launch parties and book tours, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today’s reading comes from San Francisco’s Rachel Levin, who teamed up with Evan Bloom of Wise Sons Deli to write a book of recipes and essays called “Eat Something.” 

Ben Trefny / KALW

The Bay Area's shelter-in-place ordinance reached its second week, and residents seem to be getting used to a new rhythm. It's largely slower, with very little street traffic, empty buses and trains, and take-out businesses struggling to draw customers.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

The first Monday of the shelter-in-place ordinance came with overcast skies over the San Francisco Bay Area.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

Bay Area residents tried to enjoy their Sunday as much as possible, pursuing many of their usual activities despite shelter-in-place restrictions.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

This week, families across the country will sit down for a Thanksgiving dinner made up of, well, a lot of the same dishes. But, the exact recipes can be very different and varied. San Francisco chef Traci Des Jardins draws inspiration from her multicultural childhood in the Central Valley for a feast that will make your mouth water.

Asal Ehsanipour

From the series California Foodways, we go to Rosebud's Cafe, where Tyx Pulskamp and his family push the boundaries of what people are ready for.

Marissa Ortega-Welch / KALW News

Bears in places like Yosemite are hot on human food — because we introduced it to them in the first place. We’ve been inventing solutions to keep them out of our food ever since.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

 

Tourists to the Napa valley may visit their favorite exclusive wineries and fine dining restaurants. But locals love a more humble dish: malfatti. It’s a little spinach and cheese dumpling, shaped like a pinky finger and smothered in sauce. And where do you find the most famous malfatti? In the back of a liquor store in the town of Napa.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

Rosa Hernandez left Oaxaca when she was 20 to work in the fields in Madera, California. Now, she co-owns a restaurant, Colectivo Sabor a Mi Tierra, where she cooks the food of her homeland for the many indigenous Mexicans who live in the area. She did it, she says, after realizing the cultural value of her food through inter-ethnic friendships and connections.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

Trinity County isn't in the news much, unless it’s wildfire season. It’s beautiful, remote, and rural. It’s also one of the state’s most food insecure places, where many people don’t know where their next meal is coming from. The county’s food bank director delivers food to the region’s most isolated — and hungry — residents.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

The West Side of San Bernardino is one of those neighborhoods where people still live in the houses their Mexican-American great-grandparents bought in the 1930s. Today, on the once-thriving commercial strip, there are plenty of vacant lots and storefronts, but one business is still a magnet for customers: the Mitla Cafe. It’s proof that sometimes a restaurant is more than just a restaurant. Since the ‘30s, the restaurant has born witness to and played a role in political change. It also happens to be an unlikely inspiration for how mainstream America sees — and eats — Mexican food.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

 

Right now, there are backpackers crossing into Canada after five months of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. They're called thru-hikers, and they started the trail in Mexico and will traverse 2,650 miles. Now, the lazy among us might have just read "Wild," Cheryl Strayed's memoir about the Pacific Crest Trail. The even lazier among us may be waiting for the movie to come out in December. The hikers who actually make this trek see toenails fall off and their feet can swell whole shoe sizes. They say the only thing they talk about more than their feet is food.

Jim Morris/California Rice Commission

 

Before the Gold Rush, the Central Valley in California was like a bathtub. Rivers filled with water which then slowly spread out through natural wetlands. This created a rich feeding ground for migrating species: salmon going to and from the ocean, birds flying from Alaska and Argentina.

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