transportation | KALW

transportation

Transportation and weddings are both multi-billion dollar industries--and if you're a business person, that means opportunity for reinvention. From the way we buy for our weddings, to the way we get from here to there, women are coming up with new ways to connect us to the things and services we want.

On this episode of Inflection Point, we talk with Kira Wampler of Lyft and Ilana Stern of Weddington Way.

Women driving the new economy. That's our inflection point.  

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

It's Time To Overturn the State Ban on Rent Control // East Bay Express

"...A twenty-year-old state law known as the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act blocks Oakland and other California cities from adopting sensible rent control rules that could help keep rent prices from getting even higher.

On the March 13, 2015 edition of 99% Invisible:

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 19, 2015

Feb 19, 2015
Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

King tides at Candlestick Point offer glimpse of planet’s future // SF Gate

“As this week’s king tides washed over a small beach at Candlestick Point, the San Francisco Bay became an unlikely classroom for teaching the grim reality of sea-level rise...


This is the story about a small business that helps San Francisco’s LGBTQ community and its friends get around the city in style. It’s called Homobiles, and it's a non-commercial, volunteer, 24/7 car service.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Feb 10, 2015
Dan Brekke / KQED

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Locally and Nationally, renters pay dearly to cut commutes // SF GATE

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee is backing a proposal to build a second BART tunnel to connect with the East Bay. According to documents released after his State of the City address, last week, he plans to begin a conversation with other mayors and the BART Board.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, January 22, 2015

Jan 22, 2015
A private collector and www.outsidelands.org

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Liza Veale

Earlier this fall San Francisco Muni buses displayed an ad that may have upset you. Or angered you. Or made you feel threatened. The Muni ad was part of an anti-Islam campaign calling itself the American Freedom Defense Initiative, or AFDI. It wasn’t the first time AFDI’s ads ran on Muni buses and it probably won’t be the last.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/81016120@N05/

San Francisco paints itself as a green city, a city of walkers and bicyclists, a transportation friendly city. But some say San Francisco has taken its pro-pedestrian stance too far.

A group called the Restore Transportation Balance Coalition wants to take back the roads. That’s the goal of Proposition L, a declaration of policy to make the city’s parking meters, garages and traffic laws more car-friendly. But at what cost?

Isabel Angell

Part of getting older means you can’t get around like you used to. Maybe you can’t drive a car anymore, or hike up those big San Francisco hills to catch the bus.

At about 1:30am, after a night out with friends, Kyle Nichols-Schmolze is waiting for the AC Transit 800 bus near Market and Van Ness in San Francisco’s Civic Center.

Isabel Angell

Four people have been killed by cars on Van Ness Avenue in 2014 – more than half of the pedestrian deaths in San Francisco this year.

One ran into traffic after an argument. Another was a hit and run. One didn’t appear to use a crosswalk. Stories like that seem to support the idea that pedestrians are often to blame. But in San Francisco, motorists are at fault in almost two-thirds of pedestrian collisions.

Nicole Schneider is the director of the pedestrian advocacy group Walk San Francisco.

Paying to ride the school bus

Jun 2, 2014
H. Micheal Miley

 

Skyline is one of 15 public high schools in Oakland and the only one located in the hills. The 42-acre campus is nestled among redwoods and million dollar homes.  Nearly 2,000 students attend this traditional campus and many value the diverse student body.  But that wasn’t always the case.

Skyline High opened in 1961, and was almost immediately surrounded by conflict. It’s proposed attendance zone was one mile wide, ten miles long, and based entirely in the hills, which excluded students from the flatlands. This kept the school racially, as well as economically, homogenous -- despite the fact that the city’s black population nearly doubled during the previous decade.

The Long Walk

May 20, 2014
Molly Samuel

This past Saturday, KALW contributor Molly Samuel set off on what she calls the "Long Walk." It's a tradition she started three years ago, when she and 12 friends walked the entire waterfront of San Francisco – 23 miles. It took them 11 hours, and gave them all a new perspective on their city.

Julie Caine sat down with Molly to hear about what she saw and heard. 

Checking out of Hotel 22

Apr 9, 2014
Isabel Angell

While I was reporting “Finding a home on Hotel 22” about the way some homeless use Line 22 in Santa Clara County as a shelter, I looked up the bus line on Yelp. I found a bunch of reviews, mostly from regular riders of the bus. 

People said pretty typical things, like “love those fast aggressive male drivers” and “bus drivers please lower the bus so I can get my bike on the rack easier.”

But the one that caught my eye was from Helen Garcia. She wrote:

The glory that was the original Bay Bridge

Feb 19, 2014
Courtesy of San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library

Nearly 80 years ago the Bay Bridge was described in a live broadcast on NBC Radio as “the largest, longest, and greatest completed highway bridge in the world.”

Isabel Angell

East Bay bus agency AC Transit doesn’t have the ridership or wide-reaching reputation of BART or San Francisco’s Muni. But about 100,000 people take an AC Transit bus every day-- and those riders are disproportionately lower-income, elderly, and less likely to own a car.

Over the past few years, the AC Transit has seen deep service cuts and major fare increases. At two dollars and ten cents, it’s the Bay Area’s most expensive most expensive local bus ride.

Bike riding 101: Adventures in urban biking

Jan 6, 2014

In California, once your feet leave the ground and hit the pedals of your bike, you’re under the same rules of the road as cars and trucks. But, the thing about riding a bike is that, unlike driving a car, you don’t need a license. There is no test. Once your parents take off the training wheels and let go of the back of your bike,  you’re pretty much on your own. 

I report on transportation for KALW, but I hardly ever ride my bike. I decided to take an urban bike riding class to learn everything you need to know about riding your bike in the Bay Area.

Isabel Angell

Over half of Bay Area residents support a ban on transit strikes, bucking the region’s pro-union reputation, reveals a new Field Poll. The rest of the state is split, but more Californians still believe public transit workers should have the right to strike.

AC Transit board to vote on new fare structure

Dec 11, 2013

AC Transit’s Board of Directors will vote on a new fare structure today that would raise some fares. Local advocates are protesting the increase, saying it disproportionately affects lower-income riders and other vulnerable groups.  

The new fare structure --which would go into effect this summer-- would get rid of transfers in favor of day passes and raising the price for youth and senior monthly passes from $20 to $23. Meanwhile, the adult monthly pass would drop in price from $80 to $75.

Experts raise concern about Bay Bridge rods

Dec 9, 2013
Isabel Angell

Two Bay Area engineers have released a scathing report about the official analysis of the broken rods on the Bay Bridge, Charles Piller of the Sacramento Bee reports.

The Toll Bridge Program Oversight Committee conducted the analysis after 32 key seismic rods broke on the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge back in March.

Unions sue BART over contract dispute

Dec 4, 2013
Isabel Angell

BART’s biggest unions, SEIU 1021 and ATU 1555, are suing the BART Board of Directors and the district’s management over what BART is calling a “clerical mistake” in their new contract. The unions say management is trying to backtrack.

Golden Gate Bridge Tolls Could Hit $8

Nov 15, 2013
Isabel Angell

According to projections, within five years, a drive across the Golden Gate Bridge could cost as much as $8. Officials say it's a necessary trade-off, as tolls help subsidize the area's ferry and bus service.

The board for the Golden Gate Highway and Transportation District is meeting this Friday to discuss the toll increase, which they say is necessary to offset a $142 million budget shortfall over the next five years.

Isabel Angell

Talks between Bay Area bus agency AC Transit and the union that represents its drivers and dispatchers are continuing after California governor Jerry Brown stopped halted a strike last week with a 60-day cooling-off period. ATU Local 192 had been threatening a strike that would shut down bus lines across the East Bay from Richmond to Fremont.

BART permanently lifts rush hour bike ban

Oct 29, 2013
Isabel Angell

The Bay Area's transit agency voted unanimously last week to lift the long-standing ban on bikes aboard trains during rush hour. After the five-month pilot program ends on December 1st, bikes will be permanently allowed on all BART trains, at all times. 

Previously, riders couldn’t bring bikes onto most trains during peak commute hours. There’s still some restrictions: bicyclists aren’t supposed to board crowded trains, and bikes are never allowed in the first car, or the first three cars during rush hour.

Getting to San Francisco the old-fashioned way

Oct 24, 2013
photo by Julie Caine

The BART strike earlier this week left a lot of us scrambling to find a way from point A to point B. To get where we needed to go, we stood in casual carpool lines, boarded unfamiliar buses, and braved brutal traffic on overloaded bridges. But not everybody got to work on wheels.

 

When you listen to the radio in your car, you’re listening -- but mostly driving. Your hands are on the wheel, eyes on the road, and you’re aware of the cars around you, your speed, and your environment.But, it’s really easy to take our eyes off the windshield, even just for a second.

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