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History

  • Pauli Murray at 21 - courtesy Amazon Studios
    Courtesy of Amazon Studios
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    This third week of LGBTQ History Month, Out in the Bay explores the life and accomplishments of a Black, queer civil rights pioneer left out of history books: Pauli Murray. (Airs 5 pm Friday on KALW)
  • BAR-1996-Mitulski 4 NPR.jpeg
    Photo by Phil Migliarese Jr.; image from archived Bay Area Reporter newspaper front page
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    It's LGBTQ History Month. In 1996, as AIDS ravaged San Francisco’s gay community, Metropolitan Community Church pastor Jim Mitulski risked imprisonment, dispensing marijuana to alleviate his sick congregants’ pain before it was legal. He did this in church, right after services.
  • Kathryn Bond Stockton horizontal by Lisa Duggan.jpg
    Lisa Duggan
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    "Gender is queer for everyone,” says scholar and author Kathryn Bond Stockton. She doesn’t mean “queer” only in the LGBTQIA+ sense — she means the dictionary definition: strange. “Gender is strange even when it’s played straight.”
  • WTC by RobertClark_800x465.png
    Robert Clark
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    After 20 years in Afghanistan Sandip is left with the tragic ghosts of memory.
  • WTC by RobertClark_800x465.png
    Robert Clark
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    After 20 years in Afghanistan Sandip is left with the tragic ghosts of memory.
  • Everest_800x465.png
    Stephen Alter
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    Every May 29th is Mt. Everest Day.
  • Every May 29th is Mt. Everest Day.
  • What does it mean to live through war, in wartime? People across nations and generations experience war from very different perspectives, as veterans, civilian war survivors, conscientious objectors. Today, for Memorial Day we’re bringing you those voices in the 2008 KALW documentary, Stories During Wartime.
  • It's been just over a century since the Ottoman Empire began to systematically kill what would eventually be 1.5 million Armenians. Waves of refugees immigrated to the Bay Area, fleeing the killings. Today, tens of thousands of people of Armenian descent live here. To this day, The Turkish government continues to deny that the genocide happened, and the U.S. government refused to recognize it as well — until this year.