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The East Bay’s Tri-Valley Area Asks Residents And Businesses To Cut Water Usage By 10%

Tri-Valley
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Alameda County's Tri-Valley Area includes Dublin, Pleasanton, Livermore and part of San Ramon.

Forty-one California counties are currently in a drought state of emergency. Here in the Bay Area, those include Contra Costa, Solano, Napa, and Sonoma. Now, some water agencies in Alameda County are asking residents and businesses to cut their water usage by 10 percent.

Forty-one California counties are currently in a drought state of emergency. Here in the Bay Area, those include Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano, Napa, and Sonoma. Now, some water agencies in Alameda County are asking residents and businesses to cut their water usage by 10 percent.

The cities of Livermore, Pleasanton, Dublin, and part of San Ramon make up Alameda’s Tri-Valley Area. This is California, so they have a few different types of water storage to help withstand occasional dry winters. But, as the Tri-Valley goes into its second consecutive dry year, agencies are saying they need to use stored water more sparingly.

There are a few simple ways residents and businesses can use less water. About two-thirds of the average residential water bill goes to outdoor landscaping. So, if you have a yard, you could water less, and only do so in the early morning or evening when it’s cooler, to reduce evaporation.

Another effective way to save water is to only run a washing machine or dishwasher when you have a full load.

Tri-Valley water agencies are offering rebates to residents who upgrade their home appliances or make their yards less water-dependent.

You can find rebate information and more tips for reducing water usage at calwater.com/conservation.

Annelise was born and raised in the East Bay and has a background in oral history and urban studies. For the last four and half years, she's worked as a criminal defense investigator at a public defenders office in the Bronx, New York and at an appellate defenders office in the Bay Area. As an investigator, she frequently interviews people involved in different parts of the criminal punishment system. Through her work, she has become passionate about the power of personal narratives and compelling stories to increase cross-cultural understanding and initate change.