2020 Election Briefs | KALW

2020 Election Briefs

Find your polling place using this Voter's Edge widget, and learn about your ballot below.

wiki / City of Oakland

Measure Q is called the Oakland Parks and Recreation Preservation, Litter Reduction, and Homelessness Support Act. 

If that sounds like everything but the kitchen sink, you can think of it as a parcel tax to fund outdoor areas.

About sixty percent of the revenue would go toward maintaining and improving Oakland’s parks, from cleaning the bathrooms to fixing trails.

Al Case / Flickr creative commons, used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Measure K aims to protect open space, parks, and water in Napa County. To do this, the measure would impose a quarter-cent sales tax, expected to bring in $9 million annually for the next 15 years. It would be spent on things like maintaining hiking trails in both county and city parks, restoring watersheds, and managing vegetation to prevent wildfire risk.

Tony Webster / Creative Commons, used under CC-BY-2.0

 


The media landscape has changed in this new digital age and Oakland City Council members say there’s a part of the city’s charter that needs to get with the times. This is where Oakland’s Measure R comes in. 

Currently the city’s charter states that the City Council designates the city’s official newspaper for publishing matters of legal and public notice such as election proceedings, awarding of leases and contracts, etc. But for a publication to be an official newspaper it has to be printed and published in Oakland with a minimum 25,000 daily circulation. Newspapers are struggling and the city’s longtime newspaper, the Oakland Tribune, shut down in 2016. 

Paul Sullivan / Flikr Creative Commons

 


Measure D is a $90 million bond measure to repair and replace old fire stations in unincorporated parts of Alameda County. 

Mariquitas CK / Wikimedia Commons, used under CC BY-SA 4.0

Are Alameda County voters willing to increase the sales tax to help fund young children’s healthcare and education? That’s what drafters of Measure C want to know. If passed, Measure C — or the Care for Kids initiative — would raise the county’s sales tax by one-half of one percent. This would last for 20 years and generate about $150 million annually. 

Erick Muniz / Flikr Creative Commons

Foster City residents behind the campaign to recall Councilmember Herb Perez say he’s “a bully.” Perez, who is an Olympic gold medalist in taekwondo, was first elected to City Council in 2011. 

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

Proposition E is trying to play hardball with San Francisco’s housing crisis. The measure states that if San Francisco can’t build more housing, it can’t have new office space either.

Richard Vogel / AP Photo

Some of San Francisco’s most popular neighborhoods have an empty storefront problem. In North Beach, one in every five storefronts were vacant in 2018. The city says this problem’s on the rise, though it doesn’t know how widespread it is.

Anoka County Library, used under CC-by-2.0

San Francisco’s Prop C is an incredibly small and specific ballot measure, but it’ll likely mean a lot to the handful of people it affects. 

David Seibold / Flickr Creative Commons, used under CC BY-NC 2.0, cropped

If you live in San Francisco, you’ve likely thought about the ‘Big One.’ So Proposition B probably won’t come as a big surprise. The measure is called the Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response Bond. It would allow the city to issue around $600 million to pay for earthquake-related infrastructure improvements 

Justin Yap / Flickr Creative Commons / used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Prop A would let City College of San Francisco borrow up to $845 million by issuing bonds. The money would go to buy or construct new buildings and fix up existing ones at the nine campuses to make them safe and energy efficient.

Lee Romney / KALW

The first thing you should know: This has nothing to do with the Prop 13 most Californians have heard about: That’s the measure that capped property taxes more than four decades ago. This Prop 13 just happened to be assigned the same number.