San Francisco | KALW

San Francisco

Joan Marcus

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the performing arts in the Bay Area, host David Latulipe talks with Pulitzer Prize winning playwright and MacArthur Genius Grant recipient, Suzan-Lori Parks, about the A.C.T. production of her explosively powerful and lyrical new play Father Comes Home from the Wars (Parts 1, 2 & 3).

“Right now we’re standing in front of a more arid desert feature,” says my tour guide Darryl Smith. It’s an odd thing to point out in the middle of San Francisco — and the street sounds nearby don’t let you forget that you’re in the heart of the Tenderloin, but as soon as you set foot in this park, you know you’ve walked into a unique space.

Courtesy of Sweet Lew and The Sweet and Lows

 


Behind the scenes at the San Francisco Food Bank

Apr 24, 2018
San Francisco and Marin Food Bank

Paul Ash is the executive director of the San Francisco and Marin Food Banks. And he’s taking us on a tour of the main distribution center in Potrero Hill.

Jeremy Dalmas

This story originally aired in May of 2017.

San Francisco has the strongest economy of any city in the United States. And with business booming, a lot of eyes are on local corporations to see if they are giving back to the local community by paying their fair share in taxes.

Lydia Daniller

 


Rob Best

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the performing arts in the Bay Area, host David Latulippe talks with Tanya Chianese, director of the contemporary dance company ka·nei·see | collective about the world premiere of Nevertheless, a performance that explores the field of gender-based harassment from the subtle to the violent, in a marriage of song and dance, comedy and horror.

Robert Huffstutter / Flikr / Creative Commons

 

The redevelopment of the Hunters Point Shipyard is slated to be San Francisco’s biggest redevelopment project since the 1906 earthquake.

 

The Shipyard is a former naval base and nuclear-weapons testing lab — and the cleanup of radioactive materials used there has been ongoing for decades.

 

Courtesy of Brava Center For The Arts

 

Artist Beatrice Thomas performs in drag as soulful death-metal diva Black Benatar at Drag Queen Story Time at the San Francisco Public Library — and all over the Bay.

 

She’ll be hosting Black Benatar’s Black Magic Cabaret as part of So Soul San Francisco at Brava Theater this week.

 

StoryCorps: Two moms, double the love

Apr 17, 2018
StoryCorps

Lamar Van Dyke, Paula Lewis and Traci Lewis have a special bond. Lamar gave birth to Traci when she was 18 years old. Unprepared to have a baby, she gave Traci up for adoption. Paula Lewis adopted her. Traci sat down with her biological mom, Lamar, and her adopted mom, Paula, at the StoryCorps booth at the San Francisco Public Library to talk about their family.

Click the audio player above to hear the story.

This interview was facilitated by Geraldine Ah-Sue, and produced for KALW by Chris Hambrick. It originally aired in May of 2015. 

Reimagining life and death in San Francisco

Apr 12, 2018
Courtesy of ReImagine

 

On this edition of  Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll have a conversation with UC Berkeley geophysicist Roland Bürgmann about his recent report, which explores the impacts of sea level rise on the San Francisco Bay area.

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with choreographer Christy Funsch, about the premiere of Mother, Sister, Daughter, Marvel, a full-length work which celebrates the women of two distinct eras of San Francisco dance history. Featuring a cast of women/dance-makers over 40, Mother, Sister, Daughter, Marvel is inspired by the California Dancing Girls, one of the first all-women dance companies based in San Francisco in the 1910s.

Jeff Foster

There’s Wifi and Tesla, Cheerios and Cocoa Puff. There are three registered Clintons, and thirteen Bernies. Those are just some of the names of registered dogs residing in San Francisco, where the city's 120,000 canines famously outnumber its children.


On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the student led March for Our Lives rallies around the globe. How is this youth movement changing media coverage of gun control and the NRA?

Amber Miles

 

It’s Friday night on the corner of 16th and Valencia in San Francisco’s Mission District. Shops are closing up and folks that live out here are settling into vacant doorways. The traffic on the street sounds frustrated; revving, waiting, and beeping as the last of the commuters surface from the BART station and breeze by.

 

Most of them don’t even notice a man in a poofy red and white mushroom hat, sorting through a tangled web of colored wires and extension cords.

Wikimedia user Dllu, used under CC-BY)z

Eight years ago, there was no such thing as Uber or Lyft. Taxis were around, but they only made around one percent of all vehicle trips in San Francisco. Fast forward to now, and ride hailing companies make up around 15 percent of all trips that start and end within the city — an estimated 170,000 rides per day.

Student voices on school safety: Nicole O.

Mar 15, 2018

Student voices on school safety: Ana S.

Mar 15, 2018
Photo credit: Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

 

San Francisco has made a sweeping change in how much it costs to park in the city.

Eli Wirtschafter

San Francisco has helped lead a nationwide trend of using the space by the curb for things besides parking — such as restaurant seating, extra sidewalk space, and bike-share stations. You can see all that happening at once on a single narrow, crowded street: Valencia, in the Mission. The curb space there is precious. But could you put a price tag on it?

COURTESY OF JOSE ARTIGA

It's been over a year since President Donald Trump issued an executive order promising to halt federal funding for cities that limit cooperation with immigration agents. After the order was made, mayors from across the country vowed to remain so called “sanctuary cities” anyway. 

Stories Behind the Fog: George

Mar 5, 2018
Courtesy of Stories Behind the Fog

George came out to San Francisco in the 90s, and worked at a computer company. But after his health started to deteriorate, he lost his job, and ended up homeless and panhandling.

From the Storycorps booth

If you've ever visited the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park on the Richmond waterfront, chances are you have heard of its most celebrated ranger.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

This story originally aired in August of 2016. 

There’s a warehouse in San Francisco’s Bayview neighborhood stuffed with the severed legs of aging mannequins, screws of various sizes, and large pieces of real fur.

 

Garaje Gooch

 

The Stud is a queer bar in San Francisco with a long and storied history. It was founded in 1966, the same year as the historic Compton’s Cafeteria Riot in the Tenderloin, three years before the Stonewall uprising in New York. It survived the AIDS crisis, the dot com boom, and bust and boom again — all the while building a reputation as a quirky, welcoming place for all visitors.

The Guardian

One of our listeners, Consuelo Faust, recently asked us a question through our Hey Area project: “Is it fact or urban legend that other cities or even States send their homeless people to San Francisco?”

Bringing bhangra to the Bay

Feb 8, 2018
"TEDx SF 2011 Alive - Vicki Virk with Non Stop Bhangra ©Suzie Katz #4836" by CC Flickr user Tedx SF, resized and recropped

 

By now many Westerners have been exposed to Bollywood, the lively cinematic musical soap-operas iconic to the movie industry in Mumbai. Today Bollywood films are regular shown in cinemas around the Bay. Some people though have gone beyond the screen to experience first-hand the infectious music and dance that inspire some of the famous scenes from Bollywood films.

Did you know that Richmond, Milpitas, and Palo Alto all had sub-divisions where it was illegal for African Americans to own a house? On this edition of Your Call, Richard Rothstein discusses The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, which details how laws and policy decisions promoted the very discriminatory patterns that continue today.

Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi

San Francisco-based writer and performer Paul S. Flores began his artistic life as a spoken word artist and teacher. He was one of the founding staff members of nationally recognized youth poetry organization Youth Speaks.

But over the years his career has taken a turn toward theater, especially a kind of theater that draws its stories from real life and the words of real people.

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