Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Red Flag Warning About Dangerous Fire Conditions In Parts Of The Bay Area / Robot Firefighter Debuts In Los Angeles / Trump Administration Creates "Subcabinet" For Federal Water Issues, Favoring Agriculture Interests / Shasta County COVID-19 Cases Rising In Large Part Because Of College Outbreak / State GOP Changes Labeling On Ballot Drop-Boxes / Judges Side With Rio Nido Roadhouse Over ADA Violation Lawsuit

Marcus L. Jackson

The pandemic has taken a toll on many people’s mental health. Brian Copeland wants to help those dealing with depression. His one-man show "The Waiting Period" he shares his personal story about contemplating suicide.

Sarah Lai Stirland / KALW

As Election Day approaches, we're focusing on communities with historically low voter turnout in five Bay Area counties. These 5 areas include West Oakland in Alameda County, Richmond’s Iron Triangle in Contra Costa County, Bayview-Hunter’s Point in San Francisco, East Palo Alto in San Mateo County, and Fairfield in Solano County. 

Wheelchair Basketball Is Just Basketball

Oct 8, 2020

2020 is the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, an important landmark for inclusion. In this episode of tbh, Avery Dauer tells the story of how Paralympic coach Trooper Johnson came to train young athletes like himself, and what that means to him.

Photo provided courtesy of Derek Zemrak

Like other businesses, small movie theaters are also fighting to survive in the age of COVID. Derek Zemrak knows first hand. He owns the Orinda Theatre, which turns 80 next year. Derek talks about the future of the film industry and movie theaters.

Regal Cinemas, the second-largest movie theater chain, recently announced they were temporarily closing all 536 of their U.S. theaters this week due to the pandemic. Derek is trying to keep the Orinda Theatre afloat with fundraisers and virtual events.

Click the play button above to listen to this interview.

blackatalbany

Many young people of color are faced with racism everyday, whether it’s blatant and in your face, or subtler microaggressions. One example was in the news three years ago, when a group of students at Albany High School created a racist instagram account attacking fellow Black students with racial slurs and depicted them as gorillas and hanging from nooses. The incident shook the school and the city.

Babette Thomas / KALW


Mona Caron

A group of activists in San Francisco understood the importance of mass visibility four years ago when they went on a hunger strike after a series of fatal police killings. They were called the Frisco Five, and their goal was to force out the city's police chief.

Lenny Gonzalez

Grammy-nominated violinist Alisa Rose is one-half of the duo Scroggins & Rose. Their contemporary roots music is a blend of classical and bluegrass. In this interview, Alisa talks about how her love for music has taken her from the midwest to the Bay Area.

The Tangled Web Of Cancel Culture And Activism

Oct 1, 2020

Is cancel culture a valid form of activism? In this episode of tbh, Ava Richards explores a question that's on the minds of millions, as new controversies about the influential and not-so-influential surface on a daily basis.

Angela Johnston

I visit the bottom floor of the Alisal Health Center in East Salinas in February. It’s home to the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program, where new parents on Medi-Cal can get prenatal or postpartum care. 

Angela Johnston

This summer, farmworkers in California have been working with extreme heat, wildfire smoke, and, in Monterey County, high rates of COVID-19 as they harvest and pick the food we eat every day. Then, there’s another health concern, and it’s been around for much longer — pesticide exposure.

Angela Johnston / KALW

In Salinas, if you make a run to the grocery store to pick up a bag of kale, you’ll probably pass rows and rows of the leafy green.

Oakland Roots SC

The Oakland Roots soccer team are in the semifinals for the National Independent Soccer Association championship. Their home games are about much more than the sport. Fans come to celebrate Oakland. We hear sounds of Oakland Roots games — from the local cumbia bands to Eritrean pop and hip hop.

Are You A Gamer? It Depends On Who You Ask

Sep 24, 2020

The video game industry is a multi-billion dollar enterprise, and has been growing during the pandemic. It arguably plays a bigger role in our lives than the movie, music and book publishing industries. But much of the public discussion about inclusion and diversity is still relegated to Hollywood. In this episode of tbh, Hannah Ni looks at the storylines and characters from some of the most popular video games and finds that they're riddled with stereotypes, and they still suffer from a lack of character diversity. And she talks to entrepreneurs who are trying to change that.

San Francisco author Kelly McVicker reads from her new book, "Essential Vegetable Fermentation."

Thea Matthew's Poetry Talks Grief And Celebrates Life

Sep 24, 2020

San Francisco author Thea Matthews reads from her debut book of poetry "Unearth [The Flowers]."

Brian Adams

For most of her life, Neets’aii Gwich’in leader Sarah James has worked to protect her homelands, including the coastal plain of the nearby Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But, now the U.S. government wants to lease some of the area for oil exploration and drilling. In this story from The Spiritual Edge we hear how the Gwich’in tribal government is challenging those plans, which threaten land that they call sacred. 

Oakland DJ Nina Sol talks about spinning for virtual parties during the age of COVID and why she infuses her sound with messages of justice, freedom, and love.

The deadline to get counted for Census 2020 is just around the corner — September 30. The good news is California has surpassed its 2010 census response rate. But, a quarter of Californians are considered "hard to count" because of language barriers, mistrust in government, or because they are unhoused or undocumented.

Lance Gardner / KALW

Listener Katie Taylor asked us to find out how San Francisco’s Folsom Street became “the center of sexy times.” KALW Audio Academy Fellow Lance Gardner went to find out.

Doug Zimmerman

Oakland Public Library is open for curbside pickup, but its doors remain shut. So what happens to families and kids who depend on libraries for more than books? In this installment of The Essentials, meet a children’s librarian who is working to preserve what makes the library so special.

Rebeka Rodriguez / Feminist Press

San Francisco author Juli Delgado Lopera's coming-of-age novel "Fiebre Tropical" drops you into the life of a Columbian family that moves to Miami, in the Spanglish voice of the teenage narrator.

photo provided by Jenee Darden

Gov. Gavin Newsom recently signed a bill mandating that all Cal State University freshmen entering the 2020-2021 academic year must take an ethnic studies course. KALW’s Jenee Darden shares how majoring in ethnic studies shaped her life.

Geoff Livingston / Flickr Creative Commons

COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting Black and Latinx California residents. And it’s not just the coronavirus. Across the board, CDC data shows that Black Americans have lower life expectancies than white people in the U.S. — and research suggests that racism is one reason why.

Unconfined: Joe Kirk

Sep 15, 2020

Joe Kirk is one of thousands released early from California prisons to slow the spread of COVID-19. The world he returned to was something he never prepared for.

Unconfined is a new series of special episodes that feature Uncuffed producers navigating life after incarceration.

Lyle Owerko

Oakland’s Fantastic Negrito has gone from singing in BART stations to performing on stages around the world. The two-time Grammy winner’s latest album is "Have You Lost Your Mind Yet?"

Eddie Hernandez Photography

Disability activist Alice Wong has been recognized by former Pres. Obama, Time magazine and most recently British Vogue. She’s editor of "Disability Visibility," an anthology featuring writers who give their take on living with disabilities today.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

From Santa Rosa to Salinas, farmworkers are harvesting as California burns. Workers are risking heat, smoke, and COVID-19 to pick grapes and harvest strawberries. Activists worry that 2020’s historic combination of disasters is also fueling labor abuses.

Phil Roeder

  

Schools across the Bay Area are back in session — both virtually and in-person. But some are still feeling the effects of COVID-19 on the last school year. Research shows that 2008 graduates are still experiencing impacts of the Great Recession. So what can 2020 graduates expect? 

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