Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Ben Trefny / KALW News

Earlier this month, the man known as the federal homelessness czar visited the Bay Area. Matthew Dougherty met with San Francisco homeless programs director Jeff Kositsky and Mayor London Breed, discussing a nine-million dollar boost to grants provided for the city. The meeting drew media coverage, but as we know, money won’t necessarily bring lasting solutions. We know that in part because we read Street Spirit.

Where are Asian Americans like me on the big screen?

Aug 23, 2018
Courtesy of Ashlee Nguyen

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

When I was a little girl, I always went to the movies. My favorite films were always ones that showed girls saving the day.

Is it us or is it the video games?

Aug 23, 2018
Flikr Creative Commons User Whelsko

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

Up until a few months ago, I loved video games. But I didn’t just love gaming; I was obsessed. I remember racing home everyday after school to play League of Legends. I gamed for hours and hours everyday, up until at least midnight.

vaping360.com/juul/juul-vapor-review

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

My friend Dandar Ganbold is vaping inside my car. He puts an e-cigarette that looks like a metallic USB called JUUL up to his mouth and inhales.

The history of a hidden castle in Hunters Point

Aug 22, 2018
Holly J. McDede / KALW News

 

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

 

When Bill Gilbert was a cop patrolling San Francisco’s Hunters Point neighborhood, he’d regularly pass by the Albion Castle. He’s a history buff, and that’s part of what drew him to it.

Discovering my mother’s homeland

Aug 22, 2018
Christopher Olvera

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

Mexico is an unknown country to Christopher Olvera. But it’s also his mother’s place of origin, a homeland she left as a young girl and never returned. Now, a U.S. citizen, Elizabeth Olvera longs to visit Mexico to show her American-born children their ancestral roots. Mother and son sat down to talk about their shared Mexican heritage.

The struggle to relocate after a lifetime in San Francisco

Aug 22, 2018
Julian Rodriguez

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

My grandmother, Maria Rodriguez, couldn’t afford the mortgage for her home in Bernal Heights. Living on a fixed income, she took a loan to help and eventually lost it to foreclosure. Now, she lives with her daughter in Pinole, but moving out of her home meant leaving her grandchildren and church community behind.

Buskers of San Francisco: Cordell

Aug 21, 2018
Photo by CC Flickr user Yutaka Seki, resized and recropped

If you wander around Bay Area cities, you know that street musicians are a dynamic part of the soundscape.

Lance Gardner spent some time meeting many of San Francisco's buskers, and he produced a series of profiles.

In this one, we meet Cordell, a bassist at the Powell street cable car turnaround.

Buskers of San Francisco: Larry

Aug 21, 2018
CC Flicker user Cristina Tosi, resized and recropped

If you wander around Bay Area cities, you know that street musicians are a dynamic part of the soundscape.

Lance Gardner spent some time meeting many of San Francisco's buskers, and he produced a series of profiles.

In this one, we meet Larry, a drummer performing at the corner of 3rd and Market.

by Wikimedia user Sollok29, used under CC BY-SA 4.0 / cropped

 

Last Wednesday, media outlets across the country came together in solidarity, speaking about the importance of a free press. The next day, the U.S. Senate unanimously declared “the press is not the enemy of the people” in a roll call vote. This is in response, of course, to President Trump’s statement that the media is the enemy of the American people.

by Pax Ahimsa Gethen, used under CC BY-SA 4.0 / cropped

 

London Breed took over the top office in San Francisco just over a month ago. The same election that made her mayor put a majority of political progressives on the Board of Supervisors. What does this all mean for the city and county, and how does it fit into a larger narrative about race, class, and politics?

Courtesy of NorCal Underwater Hunters

Purple sea urchins are spiny underwater invertebrates that look like pincushions. They’re native to the ocean along the California coast and share their home with sought-after delicacies like red urchin and abalone. Now, after a few years of rapid growth, some people are calling purple sea urchins a scourge.

Pooches hang 10 at World Dog Surfing Championships

Aug 20, 2018
Michael Uy

 

On a recent Friday, Michael Uy (pronounced We) showed me his dog Abbie’s custom board. It’s got a unique fin alignment — he says it helps her steer better — a notch to hold a camera in place and a leash to keep it from getting lost in the waves.

Jenee Darden / KALW News

This week marks one month since Nia Wilson, an African-American teenager, was fatally stabbed at an Oakland BART station by a white man. People in the community are still hurt and angry.

Andreas Zhou

 

Every Lunar New Year, Chinese American women from across the country travel to San Francisco to participate in the Miss Chinatown USA pageant — an ethnic beauty pageant that’s been a national event since the late fifties.

StoryCorps: Keeping family traditions alive

Aug 15, 2018

It’s not always easy to pass down family traditions, especially when they don’t match mainstream American culture. But that’s what Maria Sanchez and Roberto Vargas are trying to do. For both, Danza Azteca traditions have been important for honoring their Mexican and Nicaraguan cultural heritage. The couple sat down with their children, ages 12 and 14, for a talk about ethnic identity and why Danza is so important to them.

Flikr User Thomas Hawk / used under CC BY-NC 2.0

BART riders are on edge after a spate of killings on the system, including the brutal stabbing of 18-year-old Nia Wilson. In the wake of the violence, the transit agency announced plans for a $28 million dollar security package. That proposal includes a ban on panhandling, a fierce crackdown on fare evasion, and a ramped up surveillance system.

Leslie Griffy / KALW News

 

Arturo Magaña loved folklórico dancing — but he wanted to perform his own story. So, he founded his own LGTBQ folklórico group, Folklórico Colibrí, an ensemble that performs Mexican folk dances in San Jose.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

 

Tourists to the Napa valley may visit their favorite exclusive wineries and fine dining restaurants. But locals love a more humble dish: malfatti. It’s a little spinach and cheese dumpling, shaped like a pinky finger and smothered in sauce. And where do you find the most famous malfatti? In the back of a liquor store in the town of Napa.

Angela Johnston / KALW News

 

One of the main reasons for the decline of the salmon population in the Russian River is the simple fact that humans live along it, work along it, growing marijuana, growing grapes, building houses . . . the list goes on. So, conservationists believe part of the solution is working with the people who live right along the water to create a better environment for the fish.

Angela Johnston / KALW News

Every summer fish biologists across the state suction snorkel masks onto their faces. With scuba diving flashlights in hand, they crawl, swim, and slither up the tributaries of rivers literally counting the number and species of salmon they see to measure the health of the population. This method to monitor the salmon and steelhead populations is effective and low tech and it hasn’t changed much over the years. But the salmon population in California has changed.

Kristi Coale / KALW News

The San Francisco Bay Area Pro-Am League has featured college players, former high school stars, and even some pros for 40 years, giving fans a chance to see high-quality, competitive basketball for free all summer long.

Courtesy of Zen Hospice Project

 

For nearly three decades, the guest house of San Francisco’s Zen Hospice Project has helped the dying live out their last days with dignity. In a large, immaculately kept Victorian-style home, caregivers paid attention to patients’ physical, emotional and spiritual needs. It was known as a special place. But due to a lack of funds, the guesthouse closed in June. And unless a donor steps up, the closure could be permanent. As a way of remembering the guesthouse, we’re re-airing an interview with BJ Miller, former director of the Zen Hospice Project.

Courtesy of Glide Memorial Methodist Church

 

For months now, tensions have been brewing between Glide and the United Methodist Church. The two groups are entering talks to discuss next steps in their relationship. Reporter Marco Siler-Gonzales went to find out what that might mean for Glide.

Riding the California high-speed rail in virtual reality

Aug 12, 2018
Cropped and used with permission from TaylorHerring / Flickr / Creative Commons

People wanting to ride California's high-speed railroad have been stymied by many project setbacks. But people attending the August 11th opening of the Salesforce Transit Center got the next best thing — a virtual reality experience simulating a high-speed rail journey, complete with stylish stations and train car designs.

The Stoop: Breaking the line

Aug 9, 2018
Courtesy of The Stoop

When a ballet teacher told co-host Leila Day that her back should be straight on the ground, no light shining through, and Leila couldn't make it happen, her dreams to be a ballet dancer disappeared. The world of classical ballet is extremely difficult to break into, and for those who have darker skin, there's a lot that comes with it, especially when you're "the only". This episode looks at breaking the line.

Tony Webster via wikimedia, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

Just over two weeks ago, 18-year-old Oakland resident Nia Wilson, a black woman, was stabbed and killed by a white man while on the MacArthur BART platform. News outlets reported the story, including KTVU Channel 2, the local Fox affiliate. But, in its broadcast, the network used a photo of Wilson holding up her phone case, which looks like a gun. That led to outrage and protest that using that photo was unethical and harmful. Shortly after, community members took their protest to the station.

Courtesy of Barbara Swarr

 

Between 1909 and 1979, the state of California forcibly sterilized thousands of people, more than any other state. These people were disproportionately Latinx. A new bill would give compensation to the few hundred survivors who are still alive today.

It’s not just you. That morning commute is getting longer and longer. As the local economy picks up steam, more and more people are getting in their cars, riding BART, and hopping on their bikes to get to work. This means everyone is spending more time on the road and is doing it less comfortably.

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

The Transbay Transit Center in downtown San Francisco finally opens this weekend.

It was supposed to be the “Grand Central Station of the West,” connecting buses, BART, Caltrain, and high-speed rail. But so far, it’s a $2.1 billion bus stop with a green roof.

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