Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Got a general comment, story, or tip for us? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Courtesy of Cara Black

Book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing Bay Area readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Cara Black reading from her new book, "Three Hours in Paris."

Flickr user tze69, used under CC-BY-2.0

From San Quentin Radio:

Chanthon Bun is one of the incarcerated men at San Quentin who escaped the regime of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia as a child. 

Courtesy of Casey Kamali

May is mental health awareness month. It's an issue for people of all ages, including teenagers. According to the CDC, suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth ages 15 to 24. And the rate is increasingA Los Gatos teen who experienced challenges of her own started a podcast to give her peers struggling with mental health issues a voice. 

Gabe Grabin / KALW

Most Bay Area residents are passing their sixth week of shelter-in-place. We’ll hear from a diverse group of locals, including a real estate broker, a new mom, and a funeral director. It’s Day By Day: Quarantine Diaries.

April is National Poetry Month, and for some poetry helps make sense of the world. M.K. Chavez writes poetry that reflects on what’s going on in society and inside of herself.

Chavez is the author of "Mothermorphosis" and "Dear Animal," Her work has been honored by PEN Oakland and the Berkeley Public Library Foundation among others. In this interview she talks about themes in her writing such as nature and her mother’s battle with schizophrenia. 

Click the play button above to listen.

Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author C Pam reading from her new novel, "How Much of These Hills Is Gold."

Jessica Placzek

Each year, little blue creatures wash up along the California coast. They’re about two and a half inches across, blue, and shaped kind of like pringles. Sometimes they’re beached by the millions. They’re called velella velella.

Marissa Ortega-Welch / KALW

Melissa Jones is the Executive Director of the Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiatives, a coalition of the region's public health departments. The coalition has been meeting regularly to discuss best practices for policy decisions around COVID19. One of which is whether or not counties should keep their parks open for residents to access during the shelter in place order. 

Courtesy of Cecilia Pena-Govea

Cecilia Peña-Govea is La Doña. She is a Chicana artist whose music explores themes of romance, feminism, and identity. In this edition of Bay Area Beats, La Doña talks about finding her sound in San Francisco’s diverse Latinx communities.

Jenee Darden / KALW

Oakland is continuing to close off 74 miles of roads through their Slow Streets Initiative. The closures are supposed to give Oaklanders more safe, outdoor space while we shelter in place. But some residents in East Oakland aren’t open to the idea.

Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Marilyn Chase reading from her new book "Everything She Touched: The Life of Ruth Asawa." 

Incarcerated Father And Son Reunite After 22 Years

Apr 27, 2020
JulianGlenn Padgett / Uncuffed

From the project Uncuffed:

Lorenzo Fosselman Jr. and Lorenzo Fosselman Sr. hadn’t seen each other in 22 years. They both received life term sentences, and were incarcerated at different prisons. But thanks to a quirk of fate, we were able to bring Jr. and Sr. together face to face here at Solano Prison.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

One population that’s especially vulnerable in this COVID-19 pandemic is people who are addicted to opioids. A medication known by the brand name Suboxone can help, but it can be difficult to access, especially for people who are homeless. In 2019, we reported on a dramatic increase in Fentanyl-related deaths in Contra Costa County, and one doctor who decided to bring the medication to the streets. 

Courtesy of Shubham Goel

Shubham Goel is sheltering in place with his parents in Danville, but this isn’t the first time he’s been through a quarantine. He was on a reality TV show where isolation was one of the rules. 

It’s been 38 days since the shelter-in-place order went into effect in the region. Since then, we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay, including a teacher, a restaurant owner, an artist, a grocery store worker, a nurse, and a ten-year-old. 

Steven Senne / AP Photo

Recently, Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled the six criteria that must be met before we can all return to life as we knew it before shelter-in-place. That includes things like closely monitoring communities for the coronavirus, tracking down cases and isolating people who have it, and building capacity in local hospitals to handle sudden surges.

Courtesy of Meridy Volz

The coronavirus is on all of our minds, and for some, it brings back memories of another public health crisis, when the federal government was slow to respond and communities had to take care of each other: the AIDS epidemic.

Angela Johnston / KALW

It’s been a month since health officials across the Bay Area ordered residents to shelter in place. Since then, we have been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay to see how the pandemic is affecting our lives. This week, we will hear from a public defender, a high school student, a new parent and a single parent, a delivery driver and more.

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW

Because of the coronavirus, justice is moving more slowly in California. Jury trials have been suspended, and hearings have been delayed. But immigration courthouses are still open. In this interview, Francisco Ugarte, an immigration attorney with San Francisco’s Public Defender’s Office, speaks about how this pandemic has changed deportation hearings. 

Bay Area book release parties have been canceled while we're sheltered-in-place, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Wendy Liu reading from her new book "Abolish Silicon Valley." 

Courtesy of Melissa Jones

Melissa Jones has been electrifying stages around the Bay Area with her music and poetry. She is the lead singer of the soul/funk band No Lovely Thing. Melissa talks about how her Oakland roots and being a black woman influence her work.

Instagram / cropped

Bay Area shelters and dog rescues are currently closed to the public. So, what’s happening with all the unhoused dogs? Turns out, shelters are getting creative. 

Ben Sutherland / Flickr Creative Commons

Some singles are sexually frustrated and longing for intimacy while sheltering in place. They’re refraining from physical contact for their own health and safety. But they are finding ways to cope without touch. 

Christopher Egusa / KALW

In Fremont, an industrial road near Tesla has become home to a large number of people living in RVs. In February, the city ordered them to leave and began placing boulders in their place. We followed one resident as she struggled with her next move.

Lynn Shipman and her boyfriend live in their RV along Kato Road in Fremont. When I meet her, she immediately invites me in.

Inside, the RV looks like a miniature botanical garden.

Lynsay Skiba / Algoquin Books

While we're sheltered-in-place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today's reading is from "Why We Swim" by Berkeley author Bonnie Tsui.

Ex-Marine Confronts Terminal Cancer In Prison

Apr 13, 2020
Courtesy of Raymond Brassfield

From the project Uncuffed:

Having cancer is bad enough. But what if you had it in prison? Raymond Brassfield is an ex-marine with leukemia. He’s been told it will kill him.

Jae C. Hong / AP Photo

Domestic workers are using lessons learned from California’s wildfires to support their communities through the COVID-19 pandemic. They’re also pushing for legislation that could protect workers in future disasters.

Many Bay Area authors with spring book release dates have had to cancel launch parties and book tours, so we’re bringing the readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today’s reading comes from San Francisco’s Rachel Levin, who teamed up with Evan Bloom of Wise Sons Deli to write a book of recipes and essays called “Eat Something.” 

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

It’s been 24 days since the shelter-in-place order went into effect in the region. Since then we've been checking in regularly with a mix of people from all around the Bay, including a teacher, a restaurant owner, an artist, a grocery store worker, a nurse, and a 10 year-old.

This week we’re publishing a series of interviews to learn more about the effect coronavirus has had on people globally. Each day, we'll check in with a reporter who works abroad, but is or has been affiliated with KALW.

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