Hana Baba | KALW

Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

 

Hana Baba is the host of "Crosscurrents"- the award-winning daily newsmagazine on KALW.

 

She reports on immigrants and communities of color, health, education, race, identity, culture, religion, and arts. Her work also appears on NPR, PRI, BBC, OZY, and she is a TEDx speaker. 

 

Her work has won awards by the San Francisco Press Club , the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California, the National Association of Black Journalists- and she was named a Bay Area African Cultural Icon by the California Legislature. 

 

Hana is also co-host of the award-winning podcast The Stoop, which tells stories from across the Black diaspora. As a daughter of Sudanese immigrants, she enjoys exploring African cultures, multiculturalism, intersectionality and the richness of experiences in African communities.

 

She is also an educator and lectures on radio and podcasting at USF, SFSU, UC Berkeley, and Cal State East Bay.

 

A believer in newsroom diversity, Hana is passionate about bringing other people of color into journalism, and regularly speaks and consults on how to enter media fields to affect change in current media narratives about African, Black and Muslim communities. 

 

Ways to Connect

Wikimedia Commons

Positive cases of COVID-19 at San Quentin State Prison has now surpassed 1,000, including more than a hundred prison workers who tested positive. The outbreak started after a transfer of prisoners from Chino. People in the criminal justice field, like Hadar Aviram, a law professor at UC Hastingsfield, have been sounding the alarm about possible prison breakouts since April.  

Courtesy of Alameda County Public Defender

The Bay Area protests against ongoing police brutality have caused cities and counties to enact curfews, including Alameda County.

Pete Rosos, Berkeleyside

Bay Area residents came out in droves to protest police brutality over the weekend. While most of the protestors were peaceful, vandalism and looting also took place at shopping centers and stores. 

Mike Kai Chen

In April, nearly 4,000 Mission District residents volunteered to get tested for COVID-19 and its antibodies. Unidos en Salud released the results of that testing on Monday, which raise difficult questions about racial and class disparities in San Francisco.

Courtesy of Virgie Tovar

For many teens, body image is a big issue. It’s not a new one, but every generation faces new challenges. At one time, it was getting messages about body image from TV, movies or magazines. For today’s teenage girls, social media and the internet dominate the message of what it means to be pretty, and what size is ‘cute’.

Public Domain

The number of COVID-19 cases in Oakland rose over the weekend, just as Bay Area counties relax shelter-in-place rules. But more testing resources are coming to Oakland. And the city is increasing the number of hotel rooms for the homeless community. 

Joseph Mega

The novel coronavirus will not slow down the opioid epidemic that’s gripped the United States for decades. As the Bay Area shelters-in-place, a mobile health team in Contra Costa County continues to bring prescriptions for addiction medication directly to people who are homeless and even more isolated from services. 

Steven Senne / AP Photo

Recently, Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled the six criteria that must be met before we can all return to life as we knew it before shelter-in-place. That includes things like closely monitoring communities for the coronavirus, tracking down cases and isolating people who have it, and building capacity in local hospitals to handle sudden surges.

The Stoop

COVID-19 has hit black communities hard — in many places, harder than the general population. Here in California, as of April 17, black residents were dying at twice the rate of white residents. In New York City, black people are dying more than any other racial group. 

This week we’re publishing a series of interviews to learn more about the effect coronavirus has had on people globally. Each day, we'll check in with a reporter who works abroad, but is or has been affiliated with KALW.

Damion Hunter

The gooming industry is one of many that have been hit hard by coronavirus closures — nail shops, hair salons, and barbershops. The government doesn’t consider them essential services.

Victims of domestic violence are especially vulnerable in this health crisis because abusive partners are now not leaving for work or working from home. Even if support groups and shelters are open, a victim has to be able to make that call, which may not happen if the abuser is home all day. 

America is in a health crisis, but it’s also been in a housing crisis. For almost a quarter of renters, more than half of their income goes to their landlord. Eviction displaces a million households a year. About four million people spend at least three hours driving to and from work.

Wilson Lam / Flickr / Creative Commons

California has joined much of the rest of the world in a state of suspended animation as people try to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus. This afternoon, officials from six Bay Area counties asked residents to shelter in place, except for getting groceries or taking care of other essential functions. 

Flickr user Tony Wasserman

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The number of COVID-19 cases, and it varies county by county. As of the time of publishing, there are 14 confirmed cases in San Francisco. Santa Clara County has 45 cases, Alameda County is confirming three cases, but the numbers are constantly changing.

Noah Berger / AP Photos

Health workers and officials continue to process, treat, and quarantine passengers who were aboard the Grand Princess Cruise Ship that docked in Oakland on Monday.

Ingrid Taylar / Creative Commons, used under CC BY 2.0


Courtesy of Mary Ellen Donald

When Mary Ellen Donald was eight years old, she fell in love with the piano. Around that same time, she was also diagnosed with macular degeneration, which means she would gradually lose her eyesight. That didn’t stop her ambition. 

Courtesy of Helkina

San Francisco drag queen Heklina is ending “Mother,” the long-running weekly show that she hosts at Oasis. 

Megan Crum

From Facebook’s new privacy features, to Uber’s worker policies, the tech companies in our backyard are changing the way people around the world live every day. Rex Crum, senior business editor at the San Jose Mercury News and Bay Area News Group, gives us an update on what’s going on in Silicon Valley, and what should be on our radar. 

CalMatters.org

It’s a new year and that means new laws are on the books in California. And they are varied, dealing with everything from rent control, to maternity health, from police use of force, to online privacy.

NY Times

New York Times San Francisco Bureau Chief Thomas Fuller spent three months reporting on the High Street homelessness encampment in Oakland. What he found were people driven to homelessness by climate catastrophes, expensive medical emergencies, and more. 

Kitka Brings The Music Of Eastern Europe To The Bay

Dec 11, 2019
Thomas Pacha

Kitka is a women's singing ensemble based in Oakland. For more than 35 years, the group has been singing songs drawn from Eastern European vocal traditions. What began as an informal group of singers with a passion for those Eastern European harmonies and rhythms has grown into a critically-acclaimed professional ensemble.

The Lavin Agency

Sometimes it may feel like our society lacks empathy for other points of view, especially in politics, but also when we talk about race, gender, or even sports — we can discount the feelings and experiences of people who are different. 

Sabrina McFarland grew up in Visitacion Valley. She lived in a neighborhood where violence was a part of daily life. When she was just six, she started going to the neighborhood Boys & Girls Club.

Courtesy of Muslim Advocates

Facebook has been highly criticized for what it allows on its platform. Erroneous political ads and also what civil rights groups are calling violence-inciting hate speech. 

Courtesy of Celadon Books

Aarti Shahani is NPR’s tech reporter. You may have heard her stories over the years from Silicon Valley on everything from Facebook privacy policies, to H1-B visas, to the latest iPhone features and apps. But in her new memoir, Here We Are, she doesn’t tell tech stories, she tells the story of her immigrant Indian family, that includes strife, tests of patriotism, and even the criminal justice system.

Jenee Darden / KALW

This past spring, Alma Vasquez Garcia and her son Angel were killed by a car while crossing the street in East Oakland. Family Laundry honored the victims in a ceremony where City of Oakland representatives made a big announcement.

Courtesy of Chesa Boudin's campaign

San Francisco’s next top cop, Chesa Boudin, made his experience as a public defender and the son of incarcerated radicals the center of his campaign. And he told voters he would end racial disparities in the city’s criminal justice system.

Courtesy of Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

California is getting an energy czar. That’s according to Governor Gavin Newsom, who announced a big re-shaping of the utility company PG&E in response to the state’s ongoing wildfire crisis. 

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