Hana Baba | KALW

Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

 

Hana Baba is the host of "Crosscurrents"- the award-winning daily newsmagazine on KALW.

 

She reports on immigrants and communities of color, health, education, race, identity, culture, religion, and arts. Her work also appears on NPR, PRI, BBC, OZY, and she is a TEDx speaker. 

 

Her work has won awards by the San Francisco Press Club , the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California, the National Association of Black Journalists- and she was named a Bay Area African Cultural Icon by the California Legislature. 

 

Hana is also co-host of the award-winning podcast The Stoop, which tells stories from across the Black diaspora. As a daughter of Sudanese immigrants, she enjoys exploring African cultures, multiculturalism, intersectionality and the richness of experiences in African communities.

 

She is also an educator and lectures on radio and podcasting at USF, SFSU, UC Berkeley, and Cal State East Bay.

 

A believer in newsroom diversity, Hana is passionate about bringing other people of color into journalism, and regularly speaks and consults on how to enter media fields to affect change in current media narratives about African, Black and Muslim communities. 

 

Ways to Connect

The deadline to get counted for Census 2020 is just around the corner — September 30. The good news is California has surpassed its 2010 census response rate. But, a quarter of Californians are considered "hard to count" because of language barriers, mistrust in government, or because they are unhoused or undocumented.

Lucycal

Millions of U.S. office workers have now stretched into their sixth month of the world’s largest work-from-home experiment. Before the pandemic started, just 4% of Americans worked from home. Once the pandemic kicked in, that number jumped to 34%.

Luisa Cardoza

The CZU Lightning Complex fires cover parts of San Mateo County, and Santa Cruz County. The fires there have burnt more than 80 thousand acres. Yesterday, a marine layer came in and was a welcome help to the firefighters today, helping cool the area. 

Northern California Public Media

Fires are raging around the Bay Area and the smoke is thick in the air. One of the 'lightning complex fires' — LNU has caused major damage and evacuations in the North Bay.

Jonathan Kos-Read

In Alameda County, more than one out of every ten COVID-19 cases can be traced back to a single neighborhood’s zip code. Fruitvale is a dense, predominantly Latinx community in East Oakland, and its COVID-19 case rate is higher than Florida’s and Georgia’s, two of the hardest hit states in the country. 

Christine Palmer

Earlier this month a group of East Bay hair stylists and salon owners gathered outside Flaunt Hair Designs in Pleasanton. They were there to plot ways to convince public health officials to let them open up, and the group agreed to stage a mass reopening in defiance of stay-at-home orders.

Courtesy of Jose Cisneros, San Francisco Treasurer

Many businesses, shops and restaurants, have stopped accepting cash as a way to protect their employees from the coronavirus. But, when cash is no longer accepted, many people get left behind — the unbanked and the underbanked.

What Can COVID-19 Teach Us About Climate Change? (Ep. 4)

Aug 6, 2020
Lisa Morehouse / KALW

Originally, we were planning to do this series at the beginning of this year… but then COVID-19 hit. We had to put our climate change reporting on pause to focus on covering the coronavirus. But of course, climate change has not paused. In the final episode of our series, we find out what the pandemic can teach us about climate change. And, we talk to a psychiatrist about how to cope.

The Unseen Consequences Of Wildfire Smoke (Ep. 2)

Aug 4, 2020
James R Morrin Jr / Wikimedia Commons

Many of the extraordinary consequences of climate change are happening in a way we can't immediately feel in our everyday lives — like desertification, sea-level rise, mass human migration. But for Californians, there is one glaring exception: Wildfires. Over the last several years, they’ve become a constant presence in our lives, and the long-term effects of wildfire smoke is worse for some than others. In this episode, we start with the story of Ta'Kira Dannette Byrd, an 11-year-old girl who lives in Vallejo. Then, we hear why some domestic workers' jobs could get even riskier. 

Angela Johnston

2020 has been a historically tense year. We’ve got a pandemic that won’t end, the biggest mass protests in American history, a divisive presidential election coming, and, by the way, global temperature rise is rapidly approaching the point of no return. It’s a frightening thought. What was true before COVID-19 is even truer now: When we try to think and talk about climate change, it’s normal to become overwhelmed. This week, we're bringing you a series about the emotional and physical impacts of climate change. And we begin with a story about sea-level rise.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

The movement to defund police has forced Bay Area officials to take a hard look at their budgets in recent weeks. But radically transforming policing won’t happen overnight. In Oakland, reducing the police budget by 50% will take at least one task force. 

UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism has new leadership. Geeta Anand is the new interim dean and the first woman to be in that position. Anand started in the midst of a major shakeup over diversity at the school, after the resignation of Ed Wasserman, who was dean for seven years. 

Wikimedia Commons

The recent protests against the killing of Black people by police have put racial inequity at the forefront of our national conversation. Santa Clara County witnessed some of the first and largest protests in the Bay Area last month, in San Jose. And the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors has promised to address inequity in their county.

Wikimedia Commons

Positive cases of COVID-19 at San Quentin State Prison have now surpassed 1,000, including more than a hundred prison workers who tested positive. The outbreak started after a transfer of incarcerated people from Chino.

Courtesy of Alameda County Public Defender

The Bay Area protests against ongoing police brutality have caused cities and counties to enact curfews, including Alameda County.

Pete Rosos, Berkeleyside

Bay Area residents came out in droves to protest police brutality over the weekend. While most of the protestors were peaceful, vandalism and looting also took place at shopping centers and stores. 

Mike Kai Chen

In April, nearly 4,000 Mission District residents volunteered to get tested for COVID-19 and its antibodies. Unidos en Salud released the results of that testing on Monday, which raise difficult questions about racial and class disparities in San Francisco.

Courtesy of Virgie Tovar

For many teens, body image is a big issue. It’s not a new one, but every generation faces new challenges. At one time, it was getting messages about body image from TV, movies or magazines. For today’s teenage girls, social media and the internet dominate the message of what it means to be pretty, and what size is ‘cute’.

Public Domain

The number of COVID-19 cases in Oakland rose over the weekend, just as Bay Area counties relax shelter-in-place rules. But more testing resources are coming to Oakland. And the city is increasing the number of hotel rooms for the homeless community. 

Joseph Mega

The novel coronavirus will not slow down the opioid epidemic that’s gripped the United States for decades. As the Bay Area shelters-in-place, a mobile health team in Contra Costa County continues to bring prescriptions for addiction medication directly to people who are homeless and even more isolated from services. 

Steven Senne / AP Photo

Recently, Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled the six criteria that must be met before we can all return to life as we knew it before shelter-in-place. That includes things like closely monitoring communities for the coronavirus, tracking down cases and isolating people who have it, and building capacity in local hospitals to handle sudden surges.

The Stoop

COVID-19 has hit black communities hard — in many places, harder than the general population. Here in California, as of April 17, black residents were dying at twice the rate of white residents. In New York City, black people are dying more than any other racial group. 

This week we’re publishing a series of interviews to learn more about the effect coronavirus has had on people globally. Each day, we'll check in with a reporter who works abroad, but is or has been affiliated with KALW.

Damion Hunter

The gooming industry is one of many that have been hit hard by coronavirus closures — nail shops, hair salons, and barbershops. The government doesn’t consider them essential services.

Victims of domestic violence are especially vulnerable in this health crisis because abusive partners are now not leaving for work or working from home. Even if support groups and shelters are open, a victim has to be able to make that call, which may not happen if the abuser is home all day. 

America is in a health crisis, but it’s also been in a housing crisis. For almost a quarter of renters, more than half of their income goes to their landlord. Eviction displaces a million households a year. About four million people spend at least three hours driving to and from work.

Wilson Lam / Flickr / Creative Commons

California has joined much of the rest of the world in a state of suspended animation as people try to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus. This afternoon, officials from six Bay Area counties asked residents to shelter in place, except for getting groceries or taking care of other essential functions. 

Flickr user Tony Wasserman

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The number of COVID-19 cases, and it varies county by county. As of the time of publishing, there are 14 confirmed cases in San Francisco. Santa Clara County has 45 cases, Alameda County is confirming three cases, but the numbers are constantly changing.

Noah Berger / AP Photos

Health workers and officials continue to process, treat, and quarantine passengers who were aboard the Grand Princess Cruise Ship that docked in Oakland on Monday.

Ingrid Taylar / Creative Commons, used under CC BY 2.0


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