Hana Baba | KALW

Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

 

Hana Baba is the host of "Crosscurrents"- the award-winning daily newsmagazine on KALW.

 

She reports on immigrants and communities of color, health, education, race, identity, culture, religion, and arts. Her work also appears on NPR, PRI, BBC, OZY, and she is a TEDx speaker. 

 

Her work has won awards by the San Francisco Press Club , the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California, the National Association of Black Journalists- and she was named a Bay Area African Cultural Icon by the California Legislature. 

 

Hana is also co-host of the award-winning podcast The Stoop, which tells stories from across the Black diaspora. As a daughter of Sudanese immigrants, she enjoys exploring African cultures, multiculturalism, intersectionality and the richness of experiences in African communities.

 

She is also an educator and lectures on radio and podcasting at USF, SFSU, UC Berkeley, and Cal State East Bay.

 

A believer in newsroom diversity, Hana is passionate about bringing other people of color into journalism, and regularly speaks and consults on how to enter media fields to affect change in current media narratives about African, Black and Muslim communities. 

 

Ways to Connect

Few can argue that the country isn't heavily divided politically right now. Racial divides have deepened and it can feel like even having conversations with each other is a burden. President Joe Biden dedicated his inaugural speech to unifying the country, finding common ground, but how?

Rafiki Coalition

As the COVID-19 vaccine rollouts continue across the state and the country, there have been multiple polls, surveys, and articles that say among all racial and ethnic groups, Black Americans are the most hesitant to get it.

For many of us, success and 'making it' also means you're expected to help out and support your family. Whether you're Black American, or a child of Black immigrants, that 'Black Tax' is often something you're going to be thinking about. In this episode of The Stoop, we get personal with a story from Mwende Hinojosa who explains how WhatsApp brings her Kenyan family together but it can also be very ... taxing.

Courtesy of Daniel Nam

The arrival of vaccines at the end of 2020 brought hope that there would be a light at the end of this long COVID-19 tunnel. Still, this week, cases around the country and the state continue to surge, and the vaccine rollout has been much slower than expected.

The pen, the mic, the camera are all powerful tools that people in media have used to get our attention, but, for Black women journalists, getting a hold of that power and keeping it, has been a tough path to navigate. In this episode of The Stoop, we explore the profession with journalist Jemele Hill, and hear about the past from veteran journalist Belva Davis.

Should we support Black no matter what? In this episode of The Stoop, we discuss the pressure to conform with liking all things Black, even when you don’t really feel that way, whether it’s Black art, the Black politician, or a hashtag.

Courtesy of Danielle Fuentes Morgan

Danielle Fuentes Morgan is the author of “Laughing to Keep from Dying: African American Satire in the Twenty-First Century.”

The National Guard / Flickr / Creative Commons

News about the pandemic has been hard to miss. Coronavirus hospitalizations are soaring across California, leading to stricter COVID-19 restrictions in much of the state. Health officials are preparing for another surge of cases in the next few weeks, and they predict hospital ICU beds could reach peak capacity soon.

Flickr user Christopher Michael (CC BY 2.0)

At the beginning of the Coronavirus shutdown, the city of San Francisco rented hotel rooms for over 2,300 homeless people. For many, it was the first time in years they had a bed and bathroom to themselves. Now, the city is gradually closing these shelter-in-place hotels.

Denis Perez-Bravo / Richmond Pulse

This election, voters in Richmond elected City Council members, West Contra Costa School Board members, and passed Measure U, which changes the way businesses are taxed — it would generate $5 million dollars a year for the city.

Cheryl Guerrero / Hoodline

The country is starting the week with a new president-elect. For many people, it was a weekend of celebration. For others, it was a weekend of protest. And, while we’ve been directing a lot of our attention to the presidential race, we are also following the aftermath of our local elections here in the Bay Area. 

Courtesy of Darwin BondGraham

CORRECTION: The audio for this interview states that one Oakland measure would institute a $1,000 fine on illegal dumping. It would, in fact, remove a $1,000 limit from the Oakland City Charter for fines that violate city ordinances, such as illegal dumping.

Oakland voted on a number of local measures on Tuesday. It appears they have all passed, including ones that would remove a fine limit on illegal dumping, strengthen the police oversight commission, and lower the voting age on school board elections. Plus, four Oakland districts voted for city council and school board members.

Photo provided by El Tecolote

El Tecolote is the Bay Area’s longest running bilingual newspaper. It covers areas with Spanish speaking voters, such as East Palo Alto. Looking at the 2020 election results, there have been some wins and some losses for local organizers in those communities, plus lots of conversation about the Latino vote. 

Ben Trefny / KALW

Over the past weeks, we've ramped up our voter outreach in five communities with historically lower voter turnout rates.

Tim Adams / Wikimedia Commons

In these final days before the election, we’ve been checking in with locations around the Bay Area with the lowest voter turnout rates. We’ve gone to Richmond, East Palo Alto, West Oakland, and today we go to San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point district to hear what’s being done there to engage voters.

Mark Fujiwara, Legal Services for Prisoners With Children

California is one of just three states that requires people convicted of felonies to finish parole before they can vote. Prop 17 would change that, and grant voting rights to nearly 40,000 Californians on parole.

Wikimedia Commons

In the final weeks before the election, we’re checking in with five locations in the Bay Area with the lowest voter turnout rates. Today, we go to East Palo Alto, a city with a 62% Latinx population. This year they are voting for city councilmembers and on Measure V, an affordable housing tax on hotels. 

Flickr user GPS (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Nearly every election you'll see a bond measure on San Francisco ballots. It’s always the first proposition listed, and it's a way to fund what the Board of Supervisors or the mayor deem essential city services, like earthquake safety, school repairs, or park maintenance. 

Diane Yee / Flickr Creative Commons, used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 / Cropped

In the final weeks leading up to the election, we’re checking in on five locations in the Bay Area with the lowest voter turnout rates: Richmond, East Palo Alto, Bayview, Fairfield, and West Oakland. Today, we're going to Oakland.

Stephanie Penn / Richmond Confidential

We are listening to our audience to cover the issues that matter most to you this election season. This story is one example, and please share your own questions here.

In these last couple weeks leading up to the elections, we’re talking to people in Bay Area neighborhoods with the lowest voter turnout. Today, we go to the City of Richmond in Contra Costa County.

Flickr user josepha / Creative Commons, used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

In Deep East Oakland, a big city council race is happening. And, the current city council is set to vote on a policy that could change the visibility of homelessness in Oakland.

Sarah Lai Stirland / KALW

As Election Day approaches, we're focusing on communities with historically low voter turnout in five Bay Area counties. These 5 areas include West Oakland in Alameda County, Richmond’s Iron Triangle in Contra Costa County, Bayview-Hunter’s Point in San Francisco, East Palo Alto in San Mateo County, and Fairfield in Solano County. 

blackatalbany

Many young people of color are faced with racism everyday, whether it’s blatant and in your face, or subtler microaggressions. One example was in the news three years ago, when a group of students at Albany High School created a racist instagram account attacking fellow Black students with racial slurs and depicted them as gorillas and hanging from nooses. The incident shook the school and the city.

The deadline to get counted for Census 2020 is just around the corner — September 30. The good news is California has surpassed its 2010 census response rate. But, a quarter of Californians are considered "hard to count" because of language barriers, mistrust in government, or because they are unhoused or undocumented.

Lucycal

Millions of U.S. office workers have now stretched into their sixth month of the world’s largest work-from-home experiment. Before the pandemic started, just 4% of Americans worked from home. Once the pandemic kicked in, that number jumped to 34%.

Luisa Cardoza

The CZU Lightning Complex fires cover parts of San Mateo County, and Santa Cruz County. The fires there have burnt more than 80 thousand acres. Yesterday, a marine layer came in and was a welcome help to the firefighters today, helping cool the area. 

Northern California Public Media

Fires are raging around the Bay Area and the smoke is thick in the air. One of the 'lightning complex fires' — LNU has caused major damage and evacuations in the North Bay.

Jonathan Kos-Read

In Alameda County, more than one out of every ten COVID-19 cases can be traced back to a single neighborhood’s zip code. Fruitvale is a dense, predominantly Latinx community in East Oakland, and its COVID-19 case rate is higher than Florida’s and Georgia’s, two of the hardest hit states in the country. 

Christine Palmer

Earlier this month a group of East Bay hair stylists and salon owners gathered outside Flaunt Hair Designs in Pleasanton. They were there to plot ways to convince public health officials to let them open up, and the group agreed to stage a mass reopening in defiance of stay-at-home orders.

Courtesy of Jose Cisneros, San Francisco Treasurer

Many businesses, shops and restaurants, have stopped accepting cash as a way to protect their employees from the coronavirus. But, when cash is no longer accepted, many people get left behind — the unbanked and the underbanked.

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