Hana Baba | KALW

Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

 

Hana Baba is the host of "Crosscurrents"- the award-winning daily newsmagazine on KALW.

 

She reports on immigrants and communities of color, health, education, race, identity, culture, religion, and arts. Her work also appears on NPR, PRI, BBC, OZY, and she is a TEDx speaker. 

 

Her work has won awards by the San Francisco Press Club , the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California, the National Association of Black Journalists- and she was named a Bay Area African Cultural Icon by the California Legislature. 

 

Hana is also co-host of the award-winning podcast The Stoop, which tells stories from across the Black diaspora. As a daughter of Sudanese immigrants, she enjoys exploring African cultures, multiculturalism, intersectionality and the richness of experiences in African communities.

 

She is also an educator and lectures on radio and podcasting at USF, SFSU, UC Berkeley, and Cal State East Bay.

 

A believer in newsroom diversity, Hana is passionate about bringing other people of color into journalism, and regularly speaks and consults on how to enter media fields to affect change in current media narratives about African, Black and Muslim communities. 

 

Ways to Connect

CalMatters.org

It’s a new year and that means new laws are on the books in California. And they are varied, dealing with everything from rent control, to maternity health, from police use of force, to online privacy.

NY Times

New York Times San Francisco Bureau Chief Thomas Fuller spent three months reporting on the High Street homelessness encampment in Oakland. What he found were people driven to homelessness by climate catastrophes, expensive medical emergencies, and more. 

Kitka Brings The Music Of Eastern Europe To The Bay

Dec 11, 2019
Thomas Pacha

Kitka is a women's singing ensemble based in Oakland. For more than 35 years, the group has been singing songs drawn from Eastern European vocal traditions. What began as an informal group of singers with a passion for those Eastern European harmonies and rhythms has grown into a critically-acclaimed professional ensemble.

The Lavin Agency

Sometimes it may feel like our society lacks empathy for other points of view, especially in politics, but also when we talk about race, gender, or even sports — we can discount the feelings and experiences of people who are different. 

Sabrina McFarland grew up in Visitacion Valley. She lived in a neighborhood where violence was a part of daily life. When she was just six, she started going to the neighborhood Boys & Girls Club.

Courtesy of Muslim Advocates

Facebook has been highly criticized for what it allows on its platform. Erroneous political ads and also what civil rights groups are calling violence-inciting hate speech. 

Courtesy of Celadon Books

Aarti Shahani is NPR’s tech reporter. You may have heard her stories over the years from Silicon Valley on everything from Facebook privacy policies, to H1-B visas, to the latest iPhone features and apps. But in her new memoir, Here We Are, she doesn’t tell tech stories, she tells the story of her immigrant Indian family, that includes strife, tests of patriotism, and even the criminal justice system.

Jenee Darden / KALW

This past spring, Alma Vasquez Garcia and her son Angel were killed by a car while crossing the street in East Oakland. Family Laundry honored the victims in a ceremony where City of Oakland representatives made a big announcement.

Courtesy of Chesa Boudin's campaign

San Francisco’s next top cop, Chesa Boudin, made his experience as a public defender and the son of incarcerated radicals the center of his campaign. And he told voters he would end racial disparities in the city’s criminal justice system.

Courtesy of Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

California is getting an energy czar. That’s according to Governor Gavin Newsom, who announced a big re-shaping of the utility company PG&E in response to the state’s ongoing wildfire crisis. 

KALW

Last December in Sudan, people began a revolt against the brutal 30-year rule of dictator Omar al-Bashir.

Impact Hub Khartoum

The Innovate for Africa Conference connects African entrepreneurs and innovators to Silicon Valley to create partnerships that can help the continent grow its already booming tech field. Cities like Lagos, Nigeria and Nairobi, Kenya have rapidly growing tech sectors. 

Remittances are one aspect of immigrant life being affected by Trump’s immigration policies. And, as we hear frequently in the news, immigrants are having to navigate a system that changes with each new policy. 

Wikimedia Commons

This legislative session, California Governor Gavin Newsom had dozens of bills on his desk to consider signing into law. And the range of issues was wide, from police use of force, to water use, from vaccine exemptions to microchip implants in pets. Some he vetoed, others he signed. 

Courtesy of American Public Media

Francis Lam grew up in New Jersey to Chinese immigrant parents who dreamed of him becoming a dentist or lawyer. When he said he wanted to be a writer, well, they weren’t exactly thrilled. But then they saw that first byline and they were convinced.

Ed Schipul / Flickr creative commons

The idea of robots taking over our jobs has been part of our popular culture for decades. And, it’s generally true. As we advance, machines increasingly do the work that people used to do. 

Peg Hunter

UPDATE: 8/7/2019: Jose Armando Escobar-Lopez has been released from immigration detention
 

Since the start of August, activists have been protesting in front of San Francisco’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters. It's one of a month-long series of protests, part of what they’re calling the Month of Momentum, shedding light on ICE raids that happen in cities across the country.

The Stoop: Assalam Alaykum, BMW

Jul 24, 2019
Neema Iyer / The Stoop

From The Stoop:

Being Muslim, black and a woman; that’s something that deserves some stoopin’ out. Anti-blackness in Muslim America is real, and in this episode we look at how it often seems to fall on BMW’s (Black Muslim Women) What happens when the shade or discrimination comes from your own people?

The Stoop: The Nod

Jul 23, 2019

From The Stoop

It's that silent acknowledgment. That "I see you," moment. But not everyone is a nodder. We send producers on the streets to see if the nod is still going strong and hear from one hesitant nodder who breaks down why it's not always been her thing.

The Stoop: Black Enough

Jul 22, 2019
Neema Iyer / The Stoop

From The Stoop:

Whether it's the music we hear, the clothes we wear, or the way we talk, a lot of us at some point were made to feel 'not black enough.' In this episode, we go deep with comedian W. Kamau Bell who's felt awkward in black circles and before black audiences, and we'll meet Black Benatar, a drag queen who struggles with performing blackness.

Hana Baba / KALW

The Uyghurs are a Muslim minority in Western China who have been marginalized for years there.

Their origins are interesting — Chinese with Turkic and other central Asian influences. Their food is a fusion of Chinese, Arabic, Kazakh, Afghan and Turkish flavors and dishes. 

Hana Baba

Oakland resident Tigisti Weldeab was a child when she fled the Eritrean-Ethiopian war with her mom. They lived in refugee camps for years. During that time, her mom made a living by selling injera- their traditional flatbread. A decade later, they were resettled in the US.

Minnah Awad

 

 

On Tuesday, around 40 people gathered on the steps of San Francisco City Hall in a demonstration protesting the Sudanese military’s brutal crackdown on peaceful protesters on June 3. The demonstrators had been camping out at a sit-in in the capital, Khartoum, since April, following a four-month revolt that toppled former 30-year dictator, Omar al-Bashir.

 

Courtesy of Soleil Ho

The San Francisco Chronicle’s restaurant critic Soleil Ho is a self described ‘ethno food warrior’ who writes on what she calls ‘the fish sauce beat.’ She’s Asian American, queer, and writes about the intersections of culture and food. 

Courtesy of Linda Mertle

Judy Bebelaar and Ron Cabral were teachers at San Francisco’s Opportunity 2 High School in the 70s. It’s the school Jim Jones chose for the teenagers of his People’s Temple.

Courtesy of Haben Girma

Haben Girma is a 31-year-old lawyer from Oakland. In 2013, she was named a Champion of Change by President Obama. In 2016, she was listed in Forbes Magazine’s 30 under 30, and it’s all because of her work in the disability community.

Neema Iyer / The Stoop

What does love look like when your partner might not ‘get it’? We’ll hear from three interracial couples on how they talk about race and racism, and how sometimes, with kids in the mix, those conversations can be even harder. 

Dalya Salih

This past Saturday, hundreds of people from up and down the west coast gathered in San Francisco for a Sudan solidarity march called for by the Sudanese Association of Northern California.

Courtesy of Nikki Jones

University of California, Berkeley sociologist Nikki Jones is a criminal justice researcher and her latest book is about violence in black neighborhoods and black men with criminal histories who are trying to change their lives. She spent years in the lower Fillmore getting to know the community and what it is like to live in their rapidly changing neighborhood.

LaurenMarkham.info

Lauren Markham is an immigration reporter who covered the stories of unaccompanied children at the southern border in 2012. At the same time, Markham also works as the student program manager at Oakland Unified School District. She works with refugee kids at Oakland International, where there is a large number of undocumented students.

Pages