Hana Baba | KALW

Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

 

Hana Baba is the host of "Crosscurrents"- the award-winning daily newsmagazine on KALW.

 

She reports on immigrants and communities of color, health, education, race, identity, culture, religion, and arts. Her work also appears on NPR, PRI, BBC, OZY, and she is a TEDx speaker. 

 

Her work has won awards by the San Francisco Press Club , the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California, the National Association of Black Journalists- and she was named a Bay Area African Cultural Icon by the California Legislature. 

 

Hana is also co-host of the award-winning podcast The Stoop, which tells stories from across the Black diaspora. As a daughter of Sudanese immigrants, she enjoys exploring African cultures, multiculturalism, intersectionality and the richness of experiences in African communities.

 

She is also an educator and lectures on radio and podcasting at USF, SFSU, UC Berkeley, and Cal State East Bay.

 

A believer in newsroom diversity, Hana is passionate about bringing other people of color into journalism, and regularly speaks and consults on how to enter media fields to affect change in current media narratives about African, Black and Muslim communities. 

 

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of American Public Media

Francis Lam grew up in New Jersey to Chinese immigrant parents who dreamed of him becoming a dentist or lawyer. When he said he wanted to be a writer, well, they weren’t exactly thrilled. But then they saw that first byline and they were convinced.

Ed Schipul / Flickr creative commons

The idea of robots taking over our jobs has been part of our popular culture for decades. And, it’s generally true. As we advance, machines increasingly do the work that people used to do. 

Peg Hunter

UPDATE: 8/7/2019: Jose Armando Escobar-Lopez has been released from immigration detention
 

Since the start of August, activists have been protesting in front of San Francisco’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters. It's one of a month-long series of protests, part of what they’re calling the Month of Momentum, shedding light on ICE raids that happen in cities across the country.

The Stoop: Assalam Alaykum, BMW

Jul 24, 2019
Neema Iyer / The Stoop

From The Stoop:

Being Muslim, black and a woman; that’s something that deserves some stoopin’ out. Anti-blackness in Muslim America is real, and in this episode we look at how it often seems to fall on BMW’s (Black Muslim Women) What happens when the shade or discrimination comes from your own people?

The Stoop: The Nod

Jul 23, 2019

From The Stoop

It's that silent acknowledgment. That "I see you," moment. But not everyone is a nodder. We send producers on the streets to see if the nod is still going strong and hear from one hesitant nodder who breaks down why it's not always been her thing.

The Stoop: Black Enough

Jul 22, 2019
Neema Iyer / The Stoop

From The Stoop:

Whether it's the music we hear, the clothes we wear, or the way we talk, a lot of us at some point were made to feel 'not black enough.' In this episode, we go deep with comedian W. Kamau Bell who's felt awkward in black circles and before black audiences, and we'll meet Black Benatar, a drag queen who struggles with performing blackness.

Hana Baba / KALW

The Uyghurs are a Muslim minority in Western China who have been marginalized for years there.

Their origins are interesting — Chinese with Turkic and other central Asian influences. Their food is a fusion of Chinese, Arabic, Kazakh, Afghan and Turkish flavors and dishes. 

Hana Baba

Oakland resident Tigisti Weldeab was a child when she fled the Eritrean-Ethiopian war with her mom. They lived in refugee camps for years. During that time, her mom made a living by selling injera- their traditional flatbread. A decade later, they were resettled in the US.

Minnah Awad

 

 

On Tuesday, around 40 people gathered on the steps of San Francisco City Hall in a demonstration protesting the Sudanese military’s brutal crackdown on peaceful protesters on June 3. The demonstrators had been camping out at a sit-in in the capital, Khartoum, since April, following a four-month revolt that toppled former 30-year dictator, Omar al-Bashir.

 

Courtesy of Soleil Ho

The San Francisco Chronicle’s restaurant critic Soleil Ho is a self described ‘ethno food warrior’ who writes on what she calls ‘the fish sauce beat.’ She’s Asian American, queer, and writes about the intersections of culture and food. 

Courtesy of Linda Mertle

Judy Bebelaar and Ron Cabral were teachers at San Francisco’s Opportunity 2 High School in the 70s. It’s the school Jim Jones chose for the teenagers of his People’s Temple.

Courtesy of Haben Girma

Haben Girma is a 31-year-old lawyer from Oakland. In 2013, she was named a Champion of Change by President Obama. In 2016, she was listed in Forbes Magazine’s 30 under 30, and it’s all because of her work in the disability community.

Neema Iyer / The Stoop

What does love look like when your partner might not ‘get it’? We’ll hear from three interracial couples on how they talk about race and racism, and how sometimes, with kids in the mix, those conversations can be even harder. 

Dalya Salih

This past Saturday, hundreds of people from up and down the west coast gathered in San Francisco for a Sudan solidarity march called for by the Sudanese Association of Northern California.

Courtesy of Nikki Jones

University of California, Berkeley sociologist Nikki Jones is a criminal justice researcher and her latest book is about violence in black neighborhoods and black men with criminal histories who are trying to change their lives. She spent years in the lower Fillmore getting to know the community and what it is like to live in their rapidly changing neighborhood.

LaurenMarkham.info

Lauren Markham is an immigration reporter who covered the stories of unaccompanied children at the southern border in 2012. At the same time, Markham also works as the student program manager at Oakland Unified School District. She works with refugee kids at Oakland International, where there is a large number of undocumented students.

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

One year ago today, two police officers shot and killed an unarmed black man, Stephon Clark, in his grandmother’s backyard in Sacramento.

Mercurywoodrose / Wikimedia Commons, used under CC BY-SA 3.0

Hayward has a new council member. She’s a millennial, a renter, and Afghan American. Aisha Wahab is a 31 year old IT consultant.

by Zboralski, used under CC BY-SA 3.0 / Wikimedia Commons

Oakland resident Glenn Bailey is 85 years old. He spent 52 of those years in the penal system. Bailey was in an out of jail for most of his life, and he’s never denied the crime that got him in the longest — a double homicide.

Courtesy of The Marsh

Playwright Lisa Rothman is an East Oakland mom. One day she took her kids to a Winter Solstice Carnival in Marin, and things were never the same. She saw moms keeping very close tabs on their kids, a fire-breathing dragon, and an overall attitude that neither she nor her Oakland-raised kids understood.

Ali Eminov / Flickr Creative Commons, used under CC BY-NC 2.0 / cropped

The South Bay used to be an area where African Americans flourished. Since the late 1700s, through the Great Migration and the civil rights movement of the 60s, black families thrived, working in the car industry, public service, and yes — technology.

Courtesy of YR Media

Merk Nguyen and Nyge Turner are 22-year-olds who are not sure about adulthood just yet. Nyge is in Oakland, Merk is in Brooklyn, and together they host the podcast Adult ISH as part of YR Media — formerly Youth Radio.

Alawia Bakhit

From our new series Bay Views, a segment where we ask someone to go deep and think about an aspect of their Bay Area life that touches on a larger issue. Today, we’ll take a look from here at turmoil happening in Sudan, host Hana Baba's home country.

Courtesy of San Francisco State University

A lot has changed in the 50 years since the strike at San Francisco State University brought about the country’s first ethnic studies program. Today, ethnic etudies courses are offered nationwide.

B.F., used under CC0 1.0 / cropped / Wikimedia Commons

The Camp fire in Butte County burned down more than 15 thousand structures. Evacuation centers are filling up. The town of Paradise suffered a huge portion of the devastation: death and destruction.

Mary Franklin Harvin / KALW News

According to a study released this spring by San Francisco’s Department of Aging and Adult Services, almost 30% of San Francisco residents will be age 60 or older by 2030. And almost 30% of seniors are living alone.

Courtesy of Health Policy Research Scholars

Living with regular racial discrimination is a reality for many people. It can affect them psychologically, and even lead to depression. Now, a new study out of UC Berkeley found that those effects can also be physical.

Courtesy of rossvalleyplayers.com.

Ever since high school, people have pronounced Irma Herrera’s name wrong. When she'd correct their pronunciation, they'd ask where she was from, as if it was a foreign name. “I’m a fifth generation South Texan,” she’d say.

A new clinical trial in the National Bureau of Economic Research studied 1,300 black men in Oakland to see if race was a factor in determining whether they seek preventative care services. Owen Garrick, president and CEO of Bridge Clinical Research, co-wrote the study.

When you hear the term ‘Black Muslims’ what may come to mind is the Nation of Islam, Malcolm X, or, if you’re from the Oakland, the controversial Your Black Muslim Bakery. Local filmmaker Nijla Mu’min wants to tell a different story.

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