Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

Email Newsletter
Sign up for the Crosscurrents weekly email newsletter, delivered every Friday morning.

Podcast
Subscribe on iTunes or copy-paste http://feeds.feedburner.com/crosscurrentskalw into an app. 

Comments & Tips
Got a general comment, story, or tip for us? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

Email a reporter
Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Courtesy of Geoff Livingston

While many organizers have told protesters to socially distance and wear masks, public health experts fear the Bay Area’s demonstrations could still fuel a rise in COVID-19 infections. That could be particularly devastating to the same black and brown communities most impacted by police brutality.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons


Tony Thurmond is California’s first black Superintendent of Public Schools in four decades. Since mid-March, he’s spoken publicly only about the coronavirus. On Monday, that changed with an emotional address about racism and implicit bias.

Meradith Hoddinott

Artists, drag queens, and members of the queer and trans community gathered together to mourn the closing of San Francisco’s oldest LGBT bar, The Stud. 

Ep. 10 - I Have A Bucket

May 29, 2020

For the past 10 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a family questioning their memorial day trip down the coast, a potter who gets a positive test, and a mother afraid to send her kid back to school. It's Day By Day: KALW's Quarantine Diaries.

Cast A Line At The Angling Club

May 27, 2020

We’re down in the wilder spaces of the park, now. The lower side, with its hiking and mountain bike trails, its hidden gardens, its untamed forests. We continue westward, exploring this less cultivated area where there's more space and more animals, too. You’ll see coyotes out here sometimes. Plenty of raccoons in the evening. Foxes, if you’re lucky. We turn off the road, back into the forest. It’s quiet except for the occasional whizzing sound, gentle crank, and quiet chatter. We’re at Golden Gate Park’s casting pools. Reporter Ian Lewis shows us how it's done. 

Julia Llinas Goodman / KALW

Since shelter in place began, health officials around the Bay Area have struggled to deal with packed parks and beaches. And then there are the crowds at Lake Merritt.

Jenee Darden / KALW

Gov. Newsom announced in-store shopping can resume. County health officials in parts of the Bay Area haven’t approved this yet. We visit Oakland’s Fruitvale District to hear non-essential small business owners’ concerns and how they’re surviving.

Jess Engebretson / KALW

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many Americans into sudden intimacy with difficult feelings: anxiety, fear, and grief. In this story from The Spiritual Edge, we get to know a North Carolina woman whose Buddhist practice has helped her navigate fear and grief.

For the past nine weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a senior who sings, a teacher on his last day of class, and a bookseller happy to see regulars again.  It’s Day By Day: KALW’s Quarantine Diaries.

Put The Wind In Your Sails At Spreckels Lake

May 20, 2020

Most of the cultivated features of Golden Gate Park are found on its eastern side. Now we’re heading for the wilder west — an area more frequented by locals than tourists. And as you’ll see and hear, there’s plenty to discover. There are lots of grassy areas here where people like to picnic. It gets foggier ... and we pass by one of Golden Gate Park’s more dramatic features. It's a waterfall cascading down from a man-made hillside, right next to an overpass. We continue on, under the bridge, and down the hill. The creek running alongside us eventually feeds into a lake with plenty of birds in it. That's where we're going today: Spreckels Lake. Reporter Hannah Kingley-Ma introduces us to its visitors.

Jules Wecker

In this story from The Spiritual Edge, we'll meet Al and Andi Tauber, married singer-songwriters who direct music for a congregation of urban Mennonites in Chicago. Like their Amish and Quaker spiritual cousins, Mennonites favor the simple life, but they see God in city life too. For the Taubers, this means taking their faith and music to the streets.

Vikki McCloskey is a biologist at the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park. The museum has been closed for months, but there are tens of thousands of animals, bugs, and fish that live there. And they still need to eat. In this installment of "The Essentials," McCloskey takes us into a swamp as she feeds four snapping turtles and an albino alligator named Claude.

How Carlos Muñoz Crocheted His Way To Freedom

May 18, 2020
Steve Drown / KALW

From the series Uncuffed:

Carlos Muñoz had been incarcerated for more than 20 years when he finally found his calling—crochet. He started out in hiding, embarrassed to crochet in front of other men. But over time, he brought his art into the light. Carlos shared the wisdom he’s learned from his crochet hooks.

For the past eight weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from an 88-year-old poet, an unemployed potter, and a frustrated restaurant owner.

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Katie Flynn reading from her new novel, "The Companions."

Nose Around The Rose Garden

May 13, 2020

  

We’ve just left the Shakespeare Garden, in a thicket off 9th Avenue. We're going to head back toward the north side of the park, and to get there, we'll take a circuitous route down a hill into the parking garage serving the California Academy of Sciences and the DeYoung Museum. Soon we’re back in the sprawling music concourse. We go down a path to the left of the Japanese Tea Garden until we get to John F. Kennedy Boulevard, where our destination is just across the street. It’s a garden. Sheer Elegance. Wild Blue Yonder. Lady Elsie May. Daybreaker. Although these might sound like romance novel titles, they’re actually names for different species of the flower of romance, the rose. San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park has one whole acre of land dedicated to roses. Reporter Chris Hambrick follows the scent.

Courtesy of St. Anthony's

The city is opening its first so-called “safe-sleeping-site" nearly eight weeks after Mayor London Breed announced San Francisco’s shelter-in-place ordinance. It’s between the Asian Art Museum and the main library, right in front of City Hall.

Miss Lopez Media

When rapper Call Me Ace isn’t grinding at his YouTube job, he’s on the mic dropping positive lyrics about life and adulthood. His latest EP is ironically titled 'Working From Home.'

Where Can Women Go To Heal, Bond... And Twerk?

May 12, 2020
Alyia Renee Yates

People are gathering virtually for work, to see friends and family, and to blow off steam. Sure, there's online fitness classes, but there’s also Free The Cheeks. It’s a class that teaches women different ways to shake their booties, embrace their sensuality, and feel empowered. In this story from our archives, we visited them at In The Groove Studios in Oakland.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

There’s no end date for when it will be safe to gather in crowds again, so people around the world continue to stretch the possibilities of a Zoom call. Funerals, weddings, and church services have all been happening virtually. For one woman in Berkeley, the shelter-in-place order meant rethinking two very different rituals.

While local and state leaders are preparing for the next phase, we’re all still grappling with the way the pandemic has changed our day-to-day lives. For the past seven weeks, we’ve been checking in with people from around the Bay to hear how they are dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear about new loves, dashed dreams, and the competitive spirit of an 8-year-old Uno champ. 

One Night Gone Wrong

May 11, 2020
Courtesy of San Quentin News

From the project Uncuffed and San Quentin Radio:

 

David Jassy is a Grammy-nominated artist and songwriter from Stockholm, Sweden. With a passion for music and a promising career ahead of him, he flew to Hollywood to work with fellow artists. But six weeks into his stay Jassy found himself facing a life sentence in prison.  How did Jassy’s tale turn from triumph to tragedy so quickly?

A Hospital Chaplain On The Front Lines Of COVID-19

May 11, 2020

Rev. Claire Bohman provides support to patients, their loved ones, and staff at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. In this installment of our new series "The Essentials," Rev. Claire says COVID-19 has more caregivers asking for spiritual and emotional support.

Creative Commons

Oakland is bracing for a $122 million shortfall over 14 months due to the coronavirus. This is the largest financial shortfall in the city’s history. What is the city’s plan to weather this economic storm?

Reflect In The Shakespeare Garden

May 6, 2020

The music concourse can be seen as the cultural heart of Golden Gate Park. This wide oval plaza is filled with fountains and framed by museums and the bandshell housing the venerable Golden Gate Park Band. Now it’s time to head out from here to go to a place that’s even more timeless. We climb up stairs as we head south, around the California Academy of Sciences, into a wooded area. Back in the trees, you’ll find flowers from the writings of William Shakespeare. It’s a place dedicated to English literature’s crown prince. Walk through the entrance gate and down a worn brick path to be transported into an English garden filled with manicured flowerbeds, trimmed lawns, and people escaping the noise of the city. Reporter Jeremy Dalmas show us around.

Rebeka Rodriguez / Feminist Press

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Juli Delgado Lopera reading from her bilingual, coming of age novel "Fiebre Tropical."

Mike Kai Chen

In April, nearly 4,000 Mission District residents volunteered to get tested for COVID-19 and its antibodies. Unidos en Salud released the results of that testing on Monday, which raise difficult questions about racial and class disparities in San Francisco.

While we're sheltered-in-place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you in a series we’re calling "New Arrivals." Today, we're featuring San Francisco author Beth Lisick reading from her new novel, "Edie on the Green Screen."

Courtesy of Virgie Tovar

For many teens, body image is a big issue. It’s not a new one, but every generation faces new challenges. At one time, it was getting messages about body image from TV, movies or magazines. For today’s teenage girls, social media and the internet dominate the message of what it means to be pretty, and what size is ‘cute’.

Courtesy of Michael Johnson

Rolling out full-on distance learning assignments when only more affluent students could participate, SFUSD decided, would only deepen the achievement gap. Step One? Figuring out how many students needed devices. 

Pages