Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Morgan Lieberman

Hear the entire series on the podcast >>

Burning Man is guided by the so-called "10 Princples," one of which is radical inclusion. What does that mean for people with disabilities? Especially at an event that spans seven-square miles of cracked desert, and the most common form of transit is biking.

Daniel Parks, Flickr Creative Commons CC BY-NC 2.0

Last month, more than 100 people crowded into a library for a public meeting in Pinole, a tiny city North East of Richmond. They were there to fight a proposal to dredge the shipping canal in the Bay.

The Lavin Agency

Sometimes it may feel like our society lacks empathy for other points of view, especially in politics, but also when we talk about race, gender, or even sports — we can discount the feelings and experiences of people who are different. 

Free At Last, Thanks To A New California Law

Dec 9, 2019
Steve Drown / Uncuffed

From the project Uncuffed:

The Reed brothers, Jesse and Greg, came to prison as crime partners. Jesse was the shooter and his little brother Greg was just there to rob. They both got life sentences, with the opportunity to parole.

Ariella Markowitz / KALW

If you live in West Oakland, you’re more likely to visit the emergency room for a respiratory illness than anywhere else in the Bay Area. The culprit is diesel pollution, and heavy-duty trucks are a big part of the problem. Now, truckers like Bill Aboudi are going to be part of the solution.

Alfonso Jimenez / Flikr Creative Commons

Every 15 hours, someone is taken to the San Francisco General Hospital after being hit by a car. That’s according to San Francisco Chronicle Reporter Heather Knight.

Julie Caine

If you live or work in San Francisco, you probably hear this week’s Audiograph sound every Tuesday at noon. 

Magnolia McKay / KALW

Jules Indelicato is a Bay Area musician. They recently took part in the durational performance art project "Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy." For eight hours a day, three days in a row, 30 women and non-binary musicians played popular love songs on repeat.

Eric Gay / AP Photo

The Trump Administration is expanding its Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), a policy that says asylum seekers at the US-Mexican border must remain in Mexico while they wait for their hearings.

Andria Lo

Mimi Lok is the executive director of the human-rights organization Voice of Witness, whose mission is to amplify unheard voices. Mimi carries the passion over her day job over to the world she imagines.

Need To Vent? Call California's Warm Line

Dec 3, 2019
Audrey Dilling

This piece first aired in May, 2015. Since then, Daisy Matthias has moved on from the warm line and Dilhara Abeygoonesekera has replaced Melodee Jarvis as program manager. 

Seventy thousand people call San Francisco’s suicide crisis line each year. If someone's making that call, it usually means they're on the verge of harming themselves, and in severe emotional distress. But San Francisco has a service that’s aimed at reaching people before they’re on the brink of crisis — the San Francisco Mental Health Association's Peer-Run Warm Line.

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

It’s been 40 years since a landmark legal ruling led to a statewide ban on the IQ testing of black students for purposes of placement in special ed. Now, the lead plaintiff in that case, known as “Larry P,” is getting a second chance at an education.

Episode 4: Maserati-E

Dec 2, 2019

In 2012, Eric "Maserati-E" Abercrombie picked up the guitar and has been performing ever since. Today, the producers talk about the music that helped them through some of the most difficult moments of their life, and what tools they use to channel and understand their own pain.

This past August, he was released, at age 25. Now, he’s performing regularly. 

Haley Gray / KALW

Drug overdose deaths spiked in San Francisco last year, totaling 259 in 2018. At the same time, drug-related arrests and citations in the Tenderloin and around mid-market decreased. Some residents say open-air drug dealing has gotten worse there. A new task force aims to change that. 

Peter Field

Hear the entire episode on the podcast >>

The year was 1996. Attendance had doubled. Two people were run over in their tents. Another died in a head-on collision on the playa. Things had to change. But co-founder John Law wasn’t interested in taming the event he helped start. So he walked away.

Audrey Dilling

 

Access improvements. Structural protection. Managed retreat. Those may sound like military terms — because they are. But they also describe what’s happening at San Francisco’s Ocean Beach right now — in a biennial battle the city is waging with Mother Nature.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

This week, families across the country will sit down for a Thanksgiving dinner made up of, well, a lot of the same dishes. But, the exact recipes can be very different and varied. San Francisco chef Traci Des Jardins draws inspiration from her multicultural childhood in the Central Valley for a feast that will make your mouth water.

San Quentin News

At San Quentin State Prison, there are a variety of spaces for incarcerated people to practice their faith or spirituality. The sweat lodge serves as a space for the Native American population.

San Quentin News

 

From the project Uncuffed and San Quentin Radio:

There are about a hundred people in San Quentin state prison who identify as Native American. One of those people is Eldridge Leigh Yazzie. He's Navajo and has been incarcerated for 27 years. Native Americans like Yazzie have the right to practice their spirituality in prison. But sometimes the rules of prison conflict with their spiritual practices. 

Chris Carlson / AP Photo

Last month, California became the first state in the nation to abolish private prisons. Lawmakers include immigration detention centers in their bill — most of those are run by private companies. But Immigration and Customs Enforcement is fighting back. Bay Area politicians accuse the agency of bending federal law so that it can continue detaining immigrants in California.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

Chesa Boudin was elected San Francisco District Attorney earlier this month. But before taking that job, he was a public defender, and he learned how damaging it can be when people aren’t assigned lawyers right away. He founded the Pretrial Release Unit to bring public defenders to people faster.

The Stanford Band Scatters On

Nov 21, 2019

 

This story won a San Francisco Press Club award for sports reporting. The next Big Game is Saturday, Nov. 23 at Stanford. 

On a fall evening at Stanford Stadium in Palo Alto — better known as “The Farm” — college-football rivals UC Berkeley and Stanford meet for their annual showdown at the 120th “Big Game.”

Holly J. McDede

Fifty years ago today, indigenous people began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island to protest broken treaties and reclaim Native American heritage. Last month, Native American tribes celebrated the anniversary early with a canoe trip to the island. They gathered to honor both the history of the earth, and elders who fought to defend their place in it.

David Allen

Magician Namigoro Sumidagawa brought Japanese magic shows to America in 1866, making the artform popular. Then western magicians appropriated his act. Actor David Hirata tells this story through monologue and magic in "A Box Without a Bottom: Soko-Nashi Bako."

Jeremy Dalmas


In a quiet spot, just west of the bustle of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, sits a garden dedicated to English literature’s crowned prince: William Shakespeare. Once you make it past the entrance gate and down the worn brick path, you are transported into an English garden filled with manicured flower beds, trimmed lawns, and people escaping the noise of the city.

Sabrina McFarland grew up in Visitacion Valley. She lived in a neighborhood where violence was a part of daily life. When she was just six, she started going to the neighborhood Boys & Girls Club.

Mary Rees / KALW

Lots of new affordable housing is planned in San José but will take five to 10 years to build. So San José is launching a project called Bridge Housing Communities. It will temporarily house people in cabins and help them find a permanent place to live. 

The History Of A Hidden Castle In Hunters Point

Nov 19, 2019
Holly J. McDede / KALW News

 

From a special edition of Crosscurrents, this is part of a series of stories from students from the San Francisco Unified School District:

 

When Bill Gilbert was a cop patrolling San Francisco’s Hunters Point neighborhood, he’d regularly pass by the Albion Castle. He’s a history buff, and that’s part of what drew him to it.

Episode 3: Yoga

Nov 18, 2019

Gordon Melvin learned how to do yoga by watching TV. Soon, he was leading classes on the yard. Today, we’re talking about vulnerability, masculinity, and what it takes to put your ass in the air.

Béatrice Karjalainen. Flickr Creative Commons. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Last month, the Bay Area got a taste of what our new fire season could look like. Big fires, and big blackouts. And it’s not over yet.

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