Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Exploring the legends of Twin Peaks

23 hours ago

 

In this Audiograph, we go to Twin Peaks, a signature San Francisco landmark and a focus of the city's history and legends. The Ohlone believed the peaks were once a single mountain, united as husband and wife, but they argued so much, the great spirit split them apart.

Mia Nakano is documenting queer Asian Pacific American experiences one snapshot at a time

23 hours ago
Andria Lo

Mia Nakano is a photographer and archivist with an interest in LGBTQ stories. But she used to struggle to find resources on queer and trans Asian American history. So she took it upon herself to begin documenting their experiences.

Angela Johnston

 


When you’re driving down the coast on Highway 1 toward Monterey, you may miss the exit for the tiny city of Marina. It’s often overshadowed by its neighbors: Monterey with the aquarium and Cannery Row, Carmel by the Sea. But if you take that exit, you’ll pass a Walmart, some fast food chains, and row of hotels. What makes the city stand out is it’s dozens of beach trails.

Muralist Juana Alicia on making art inspired by poetry

May 22, 2019
Courtesy of Juana Alicia

Muralist and activist Juana Alicia grew up in Detroit inspired by the work of Mexican artist Diego Rivera. In the 1970s, Juana was making posters for the United Farm Workers’ grape boycotts, when she was recruited by civil rights activist Cesar Chavez.

Dean's Cards / Bo Walsh / KALW News

Portland Trail Blazers guard and East Oakland native Damian Lillard recently returned to Oracle Arena to face off against the Golden State Warriors in the same building where he grew up cheering for them. 

Liza Veale / KALW

Farmworkers employed by one of the biggest fruit growers in the country have officially ousted the United Farm Workers, the union founded by Cesar Chavez. Why would so many workers vote against unionizing, especially in a place where the farmworker movement has such a strong legacy? Was the election fair?

George Birch / Associated Press

The story of the United Farm Workers’ dwindling ranks is a lot bigger than the latest election at Gerawan Farming, where it was decertified. The union has been shrinking for decades. They’re not alone. Most unions have been shrinking since the ‘80s. But the details of the UFW’s rise and fall are not well known.

Courtesy of Gabby Rivera

While growing up in the Bronx, writer Gabby Rivera would sit at her grandmother’s dining table listening to stories from her “sheroes” — the women in her family. Gabby infused elements from her own life into America Chavez, Marvel Comics’ first queer Latina superhero with her very own series. 

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

Latino workers are more likely to die at work than anyone else, and immigrant workers can be particularly at risk.

courtesy of Kinetic Steam Works

In this Audiograph, we go to a warehouse tucked away behind a metal scrap yard. Kinetic Steam Works is an industrial workspace for people to tinker with old machines in West Oakland. A mish-mash group of engineers, artists and hobbyists gather here every weekend to bring back the lost art of steam power.

Lauryn D'Angelo

The Golden State Warriors are rolling, now. Last night they crushed the Portland Trailblazers in the first game of the Western Conference Finals. But, win or lose, the team is leaving for San Francisco next year. In the latest from Bounce, we're looking at how the Golden State Warriors organization is teaming up with local businesses like Oakland's Bakesale Betty to bring some East Bay flavor to the City.

Courtesy of Soleil Ho

The San Francisco Chronicle’s restaurant critic Soleil Ho is a self described ‘ethno food warrior’ who writes on what she calls ‘the fish sauce beat.’ She’s Asian American, queer, and writes about the intersections of culture and food. 

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW

On April 13, a Mercedes slammed into a family crossing the street in East Oakland. A 6-year-old and his mother were both killed. Another family member was critically injured. Foothill Boulevard, where it happened, is one of Oakland’s most dangerous streets for pedestrians.

Courtesy of James Cagney

Poet James Cagney was 19 when he found out he was adopted. A few years later, both of his parents passed away, and Cagney was left homeless. He reflects on this heavy time in his collection "Black Steel Magnolias in the Hour of Chaos Theory.

Who is the ancient king looking down on Civic Center?

May 14, 2019

A regal statue keeps watch of San Francisco Main Library's Fulton Street entrance. Who is he and why is he there? 

What happens during a lockdown at San Quentin?

May 13, 2019
Nigel Poor

A lockdown happens when correctional officers decide there is a threat to the safety and security of a prison. That might be a fight, an assault, or a race riot. So what's it like in a lockdown? 

Damon L. Cooke

From the series Uncuffed:

A lot of people want to get out of prison. This is the story of one bird that tried to get in.

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning while black: The fight for equity in San Francisco schools.”

A new intensive SFUSD program helps kids aged three-and-a-half to five regulate and understand their emotions. The goal: to avert an “emotional disturbance” designation, a special ed category where black children are overrepresented.

Bethel Island: Sounds from the outer edges of the Bay

May 9, 2019
Ashleyanne Krigbaum

In this Audiograph, we go to a place that’s a little more than an hour’s drive from San Francisco, right in the middle of the California Delta — Bethel Island. 

Courtesy of Linda Mertle

Judy Bebelaar and Ron Cabral were teachers at San Francisco’s Opportunity 2 High School in the 70s. It’s the school Jim Jones chose for the teenagers of his People’s Temple.

Wikimedia user Pi.1415926535, used under CC BY-SA 3.0

You can say the Warriors relocating to San Francisco is a business move. With courtside suites costing more than $2 million a year in a city with some of the wealthiest folks on the planet, the franchise is poised to make a lot more money. Not to mention the businesses popping up near the Warriors’ new billion-dollar Chase Center. But what about the Oakland establishments near Oracle Arena in East Oakland? What are their prospects after the team leaves? In this episode of Bounce, we're headed down Hegenberger Road to see how businesses are feeling about the Warriors bouncing to San Francisco.

Building a team within prison walls

May 8, 2019
"Basketball" by CC Flickr user Chilli Head, resized and recropped

The Golden State Warriors preseason starts this coming Saturday. Earlier this month, as something of a warmup, they made one of their regular visits into San Quentin State Prison to visit with inmates and play a game of basketball.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

Three years ago, Oakland adopted a policy to help people busted for marijuana crimes get into the legal market. Alphonso T. Blunt is the first equity applicant benefiting from this program with a dispensary open for business.

Courtesy of Haben Girma

Haben Girma is a 31-year-old lawyer from Oakland. In 2013, she was named a Champion of Change by President Obama. In 2016, she was listed in Forbes Magazine’s 30 under 30, and it’s all because of her work in the disability community.

Creative Commons, used under CC BY 4.0

Professor of Journalism Elena Conis wrote a book on the history of vaccines. She says, since we’ve had vaccinations in this country, we’ve had opposition to them. 

Eli Wirtschafter

Cat Spediacci takes me on a neighborhood tour of crumbling roads. We’re in Richmond, where she’s lived most of her life. Her Volkswagen rumbles over washboard pavement.

The prisoner who died twice, and lived

May 6, 2019
Steve Drown

From the series Uncuffed:

Wilbert Stoneham has been incarcerated since the 70s – a time when prisons were especially dangerous, guards were particularly unpleasant, and Stoneham was one of their targets. He had a terrible relationship with the “watchers” which continued for over 40 years ... until the day he died.  

An ode to Morse code

May 2, 2019
Julie Caine / KALW

This is an Audiograph, a radio project mapping the Bay Area’s sonic signature. Audiograph tells the story of where you live and the people who live there with you. 

Jody Colley

This weekend Downtown Berkeley will transform into a literary paradise for the Bay Area Book Festival. Cherilyn Parsons started the event in 2015 after being inspired by the LA Times book festival

Courtesy of MEDA

San Francisco’s Mission District was once a neighborhood known for being home to working-class immigrants. Now, it’s a hipster haven thanks to the tech boom. 

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