Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Jenny G. Shao / KALW

Life may feel like it’s on pause because of COVID-19. But climate change isn’t paused. How is the pandemic affecting the climate and the people working on solutions? 

Jenee Darden / KALW

As climate change intensifies, what toll will it take on our mental health in the future? Dr. Robin Cooper is a psychiatrist and co-founder of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance. She gives us a projection of what’s possible to come.

What Can COVID-19 Teach Us About Climate Change? (Ep. 4)

Aug 6, 2020
Lisa Morehouse / KALW

Originally, we were planning to do this series at the beginning of this year… but then COVID-19 hit. We had to put our climate change reporting on pause to focus on covering the coronavirus. But of course, climate change has not paused. In the final episode of our series, we find out what the pandemic can teach us about climate change. And, we talk to a psychiatrist about how to cope.

Robin Loznak / Courtesy of Our Children's Trust

Many environmental lawyers around the country have filed lawsuits against corporations and the government for their role in climate change. Many of these cases fail, stall, or are dismissed, but the quest to litigate the climate crisis continues.

Shereen Adel / KALW

The coronavirus has pumped the brakes on air travel. But before that, flying was responsible for about 5% of man-made global warming. So if and when the demand for air travel goes back to its pre-COVID trajectory, it could account for a quarter of the world’s carbon budget. That budget is what would keep temperatures from rising more than 1 and a half degrees Celsius by 2050. That’s why there’s been a growing movement for people to fly less.

Who Should Be Responsible For Saving The Planet? (Ep. 3)

Aug 5, 2020
Courtesy of Our Children's Trust

Climate change is a juggernaut — a huge, powerful, and overwhelming force. It's overwhelming because it’s a powerful force, and also because the very things that have created it are such deeply-rooted institutions. Fossil fuels are so ubiquitous and the industry that produces them so powerful, that challenging their influence can seem hopeless. In this episode, we hear about young people who are suing over their right to life, liberty ... and a healthy planet. Then, what do we do when one of the things that unites us is also a major contributor to climate change?

Courtesy of California National Guard

Climate change is intensifying California’s wildfires, and in many cases, low-wage immigrant workers like Socorro are cleaning up after them. Now, they’re fighting for new legislation that could protect them through climate disasters and a growing pandemic.

Lee Romney / KALW

Extreme wildfires fueled by climate change have been spewing more harmful smoke into California’s air in recent years. But not everyone is affected equally. Kids like Ta’Kira Dannette Byrd, who live in unhealthy, high-poverty neighborhoods, suffer more.

The Unseen Consequences Of Wildfire Smoke (Ep. 2)

Aug 4, 2020
James R Morrin Jr / Wikimedia Commons

Many of the extraordinary consequences of climate change are happening in a way we can't immediately feel in our everyday lives — like desertification, sea-level rise, mass human migration. But for Californians, there is one glaring exception: Wildfires. Over the last several years, they’ve become a constant presence in our lives, and the long-term effects of wildfire smoke is worse for some than others. In this episode, we start with the story of Ta'Kira Dannette Byrd, an 11-year-old girl who lives in Vallejo. Then, we hear why some domestic workers' jobs could get even riskier. 

Angela Johnston

2020 has been a historically tense year. We’ve got a pandemic that won’t end, the biggest mass protests in American history, a divisive presidential election coming, and, by the way, global temperature rise is rapidly approaching the point of no return. It’s a frightening thought. What was true before COVID-19 is even truer now: When we try to think and talk about climate change, it’s normal to become overwhelmed. This week, we're bringing you a series about the emotional and physical impacts of climate change. And we begin with a story about sea-level rise.

Book tours have been canceled since shelter-in-place began, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from Oakland author Elwin Cotman reading from his new short story collection "Dance on Saturday."

Bradley Jacob Cox

Cellist Joshua McClain composes songs that make listeners feel like they’re in another world. His mystical sound is a blend of electronica, classical, and rock. Joshua’s latest album "Coming Home" is inspired by the story archetype of the hero’s journey. 

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

The movement to defund police has forced Bay Area officials to take a hard look at their budgets in recent weeks. But radically transforming policing won’t happen overnight. In Oakland, reducing the police budget by 50% will take at least one task force. 

Book tours have been canceled since shelter-in-place began, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from Oakland author Maggie Tokuda-Hall reading from her new young adult fantasy novel, "The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea."

The Seshen is a band that’s a family of friends. Over the past decade, they've grown up together, dedicated to music with purpose. In this edition of Bay Area Beats, they share the influences behind their latest album, Cyan.

Picture People

Oakland author Mary Monroe has been captivating her readers with juicy storylines and unforgettable characters for decades. Her latest novel “Across the Way” is about two neighboring couples who are both friends and enemies living in 1930s Alabama.

Uncuffed

From the project Uncuffed:

How many of us have been lucky enough to turn one of our favorite childhood hobbies into a way to earn a living? Imagine being paid for the simple, innocent joy of riding a bike? One of our trainees, Jeb DeAngelis spoke to another producer, Joe Kirk, about his life-long obsession with riding on two wheels.

Global events designer Edward Perotti put his glamorous touch on affairs for celebrities and corporations. He talks about how he went from being a shy San Francisco kid to planning luxurious parties in Hollywood, the Great Wall of China, and beyond.

Flickr user The National Guard (CC BY 2.0)

By now, over four months into the shelter-in-place ordinance, you’ve probably swapped testing stories — or been on a Zoom call featuring questions such as: How did you get an appointment? Did it hurt? How long to get the test results?

Shelter-in-place caused many artists to postpone or cancel live concert events, but that didn’t stop Freddie from releasing new material or performing online. In this edition of Bay Area Beats, the Oakland-based R&B singer talks about how releasing their debut album Melanin Monroe helped them express what it means to be black and genderfluid.

Book tours have been canceled since shelter-in-place began, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from San Francisco author Kelly McVicker reading from her new book, "Essential Vegetable Fermentation."

Dark Cyst / Wikimedia Commons

Some changes are coming to Deep East Oakland due to a $28.2 million grant that targets low-income areas affected by pollution. Oakland Chief Resilience Officer Alexandria McBride is the city’s lead on the grant. She provides more detail about the projects, including the environmental and economic impacts.

Jinho’s Journey: Fighting Police Violence From the Inside

Jul 21, 2020
Courtesy of Jinho Ferriera

Black Lives Matter might be the largest social movement in American history. Last month, an estimated 15 to 26 million people took to the streets to protest police violence, launching a national conversation about the role systemic racism plays in law enforcement.

Bart Heird, used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 / cropped

From San Quentin Radio:

In prisons across the United States, incarcerated people often separate themselves by race or ethnicity. Blacks hang with blacks, whites with whites, and so forth. But at San Quentin, people of all races participate in playing in a role-playing game called Dungeons and Dragons. They defy prison politics to share in a fun activity and also escape from the stress of the prison system.

Jake Bunch

In California, a lot of people whose jobs have been deemed essential during the shelter-in-place work in food, including commercial fishers. The industry is tough even in the best of times. Now, restaurant closures and social distancing have made fishing for a living more complex — and child care plays a role too. In this installment of The Essentials, we meet a commercial fisher and father.

Oakland hip hop artist Jwalt has opened for rap legends such as Nas and the WuTang Clan. And he’s barely out of high school. This is just the beginning for the rising star. Jwalt talks about mental health and his debut album 'Yours Truly.'

UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism has new leadership. Geeta Anand is the new interim dean and the first woman to be in that position. Anand started in the midst of a major shakeup over diversity at the school, after the resignation of Ed Wasserman, who was dean for seven years. 

Tracking Down A Mysterious Hum In San Francisco

Jul 16, 2020
Nikolas Harter / KALW

Recently, reporter Nikolas Harter heard an eerie hum floating through his neighborhood. He hopped on his bike and journeyed out with his recorder to discover why the north side of San Francisco is suddenly being bathed in mysterious ethereal tones. 

Click the play button to listen to the story.

Porfirio Rangel / KALW

Hey Area is where you ask the questions and we find the answers. Today’s question comes from Monzerrath Gonzalez: “Who are the most influential Latinos in the Bay Area?”

Book tours have been canceled since shelter-in-place began, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from Newark-based author Juliette Wade reading from her new science fiction novel, "Mazes of Power."

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