Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Got a general comment, story, or tip for us? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Are You A Gamer? It Depends On Who You Ask

Sep 24, 2020

The video game industry is a multi-billion dollar enterprise, and has been growing during the pandemic. It arguably plays a bigger role in our lives than the movie, music and book publishing industries. But much of the public discussion about inclusion and diversity is still relegated to Hollywood.

San Francisco author Kelly McVicker reads from her new book, "Essential Vegetable Fermentation."

'Unearth [The Flowers]' Talks Grief And Celebrates Life

Sep 24, 2020

San Francisco author Thea Matthews reads from her debut book of poetry "Unearth [The Flowers]."

Brian Adams

For most of her life, Neets’aii Gwich’in leader Sarah James has worked to protect her homelands, including the coastal plain of the nearby Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But, now the U.S. government wants to lease some of the area for oil exploration and drilling. In this story from The Spiritual Edge we hear how the Gwich’in tribal government is challenging those plans, which threaten land that they call sacred. 

Oakland DJ Nina Sol talks about spinning for virtual parties during the age of COVID and why she infuses her sound with messages of justice, freedom, and love.

The deadline to get counted for Census 2020 is just around the corner — September 30. The good news is California has surpassed its 2010 census response rate. But, a quarter of Californians are considered "hard to count" because of language barriers, mistrust in government, or because they are unhoused or undocumented.

Lance Gardner / KALW

Listener Katie Taylor asked us to find out how San Francisco’s Folsom Street became “the center of sexy times.” KALW Audio Academy Fellow Lance Gardner went to find out.

Doug Zimmerman

Oakland Public Library is open for curbside pickup, but its doors remain shut. So what happens to families and kids who depend on libraries for more than books? In this installment of The Essentials, meet a children’s librarian who is working to preserve what makes the library so special.

Rebeka Rodriguez / Feminist Press

San Francisco author Juli Delgado Lopera's coming-of-age novel "Fiebre Tropical" drops you into the life of a Columbian family that moves to Miami, in the Spanglish voice of the teenage narrator.

photo provided by Jenee Darden

Gov. Gavin Newsom recently signed a bill mandating that all Cal State University freshmen entering the 2020-2021 academic year must take an ethnic studies course. KALW’s Jenee Darden shares how majoring in ethnic studies shaped her life.

Geoff Livingston / Flickr Creative Commons

COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting Black and Latinx California residents. And it’s not just the coronavirus. Across the board, CDC data shows that Black Americans have lower life expectancies than white people in the U.S. — and research suggests that racism is one reason why.

Unconfined: Joe Kirk

Sep 15, 2020

Joe Kirk is one of thousands released early from California prisons to slow the spread of COVID-19. The world he returned to was something he never prepared for.

Unconfined is a new series of special episodes that feature Uncuffed producers navigating life after incarceration.

San Francisco author Katie Flynn's new novel, "The Companions," which came out in March, is set in the near future, with California under quarantine.

Lyle Owerko

Oakland’s Fantastic Negrito has gone from singing in BART stations to performing on stages around the world. The two-time Grammy winner’s latest album is "Have You Lost Your Mind Yet?"

Eddie Hernandez Photography

Disability activist Alice Wong has been recognized by former Pres. Obama, Time magazine and most recently British Vogue. She’s editor of "Disability Visibility," an anthology featuring writers who give their take on living with disabilities today.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

From Santa Rosa to Salinas, farmworkers are harvesting as California burns. Workers are risking heat, smoke, and COVID-19 to pick grapes and harvest strawberries. Activists worry that 2020’s historic combination of disasters is also fueling labor abuses.

Phil Roeder

  

Schools across the Bay Area are back in session — both virtually and in-person. But some are still feeling the effects of COVID-19 on the last school year. Research shows that 2008 graduates are still experiencing impacts of the Great Recession. So what can 2020 graduates expect? 

Amanda Levin

San Francisco students have been back to school for nearly a month now, and a lot has changed for students — and for teachers. Amanda Levin is currently a teacher in the San Francisco Unified School District at Leadership High School, and she’s been teaching for nearly three decades. As part of our ongoing series The Essentials, we’re bringing you overlooked stories of essential workers: people who are still being called to work while most of us are sheltered in place.

Photo by Andria Lo

Oakland author Monica Sok reads from her book of poetry, "A Nail the Evening Hangs On," which explores the Cambodian diaspora. It’s about what it means to inherit a history of genocide and process inter-generational trauma.

Book tours have been canceled since shelter-in-place began, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from San Francisco author Angela Terry reading from her book "Charming Falls Apart."

Unconfined: Chanthon Bun

Sep 8, 2020

Chanthon Bun caught the coronavirus at San Quentin Prison during one of the worst outbreaks in the country. On top of the usual challenges people face when they parole, Bun had to deal with COVID recovery, survivor's guilt, and the fear that ICE would put him back in a different kind of prison. 

Unconfined is a new special series that features Uncuffed producers navigating life after incarceration.

San Francisco author Rachel Levin teamed up with Evan Bloom from Wise Sons Deli on a book of recipes and essays called "Eat Something." She says, "It’s basically about how a Jewish life is marked by meals ... One of my favorite sections is the wedding section."

Que Viva Camp

One of the principles guiding Burning Man is "Radical Inclusion." Basically, all are welcome. But, the temporary city that Burners build in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert has never been racially diverse. Just 1% of attendees self-identify as Black.

Ep 08 - PRESENT meets PAST at Burning Man

Sep 1, 2020
LUCY KANG

Every year — in normal years — thousands of people trek to Black Rock Desert in Nevada for Burning Man. But, most don’t know about the history of the land or the people who were its original inhabitants. In this episode of THE INTERSECTION at Burning Man, we learn more about the history of the Pyramid Lake Paiutes and the relationship between the event and the tribe.

Ep 07 - REVELRY meets REVERENCE at Burning Man

Aug 31, 2020
Photo by Jamen Percy

If the wooden man effigy represents Burning Man’s cosmic and comic core, the Temple is its heart and soul. A place where people come to honor and grieve, Burning Man’s Temple has become a potent and sacred space in the middle of nowhere. In this episode of THE INTERSECTION at Burning Man, we hear why Burners have such a strong attachment to a temporary structure that’s little more than wood and nails.

Lucycal

Millions of U.S. office workers have now stretched into their sixth month of the world’s largest work-from-home experiment. Before the pandemic started, just 4% of Americans worked from home. Once the pandemic kicked in, that number jumped to 34%.

Luisa Cardoza

The CZU Lightning Complex fires cover parts of San Mateo County, and Santa Cruz County. The fires there have burnt more than 80 thousand acres. Yesterday, a marine layer came in and was a welcome help to the firefighters today, helping cool the area. 

Book tours have been canceled since shelter-in-place began, so we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one is from San Francisco author Shruti Swamy reading from her new short story collection, "A House Is A Body."

Northern California Public Media

Fires are raging around the Bay Area and the smoke is thick in the air. One of the 'lightning complex fires' — LNU has caused major damage and evacuations in the North Bay.

Courtesy of UCSF / Adobe Stock

Like many people, back in April, Christin New needed something to look forward to. Not only was a pandemic spreading around the word, she’d just had a miscarriage. So when she and her husband found out they were expecting, they were overjoyed. 

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