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Fairfield Edition: June 15, 2021

Fairfield Edition

Click the play button to listen to the live newscast with info & resources for Fairfield.

Coronavirus Tracker — SF Chronicle

“The average number of new coronavirus cases reported daily in the Bay Area for the week that ended June 6 and included the Memorial Day holiday with limited reporting was 177, down from 200 the previous week. The daily average for May, which included a backlog of more than 1,000 cases being reported in Alameda County on May 4, was 231. That number is down from 470 in April and down from more than 3,500 per day in January.”

California's June 15 reopening: Latest news and live updates — SF Chronicle
“The state has reported fewer than 1,000 cases a day on average for the past two weeks — the lowest numbers since March 2020. COVID-19 deaths are similarly low, with fewer than two dozen reported a day. Nearly 47% of all Californians are fully vaccinated — and officials are working overtime to boost that number as things gets back to normal.”

Parents, community can view, comment on Fairfield-Suisun district’s plans — Daily Republic
“• Goal One: By June 2024, the district will fully implement a tiered integrated social-emotional program to support the well-being of all students and staff by promoting prosocial behavior, teaching coping and decision-making skills, and modeling positive relationships.
Goal Two: Execute an equitable, high-quality educational program and provide educational options to ensure every student graduates college and career ready.
Goal Three: By June 2024, the district will implement and refine a staffing plan that includes aggressive recruitment and professional learning in order to retain and develop staff.
Goal Four: Create safe, inclusive and welcoming learning environments where students are connected to their schools and staff are connected to their work environment.
Goal Five: Engage parents, families and community partners through education, communication and collaboration to promote student success.”

Lumber shortage hikes cost of pallets for Northern California manufacturers — The North Bay Business Journal
“Pallet prices in the U.S. are usually between $9 and $12. Today it’s closer to $15 on average. In California, where goods often cost more than the national average, businesses are seeing an even greater increase. One North Bay company that didn’t want its name used said pallets had gone from $10 to $26 in the last three to four months.”

City Church’s Pop-Up Shelter produces results for Fairfield’s homeless residents — Daily Republic
“City Church has provided services to those in need for more than a decade. This pilot program began in April with the help of the city and some area churches to serve up to nine homeless individuals, with temporary shelter, case management, job placement, housing navigation and the ultimate goal of connections to permanent housing. … All nine original participants in the program have been able to find entry-level jobs in the community. They live on-site, build up their funds and hopefully get to the point of living in Sober Living Environment homes, featuring rooms for three to four residents, with the ultimate goal of finding permanent residences.”

What Works: Grassroots Solutions Around The Bay — KALW

“During the past year, COVID-19 hit some Bay Area communities harder than others. The neighborhoods that suffered the most have long faced racial and health inequities. This series presents stories of trailblazing leaders and groups who banded together to lift people up during the most difficult of times.”

Fairfield Gleaning — KALW

“Food insecurity was already a problem in the United States before the Coronavirus pandemic made it even worse. According to one projection, one in eight people in the U.S. will experience food insecurity in 2021. A network of volunteers in Solano County is turning to its neighbors to help address this problem. More specifically, they are turning to their neighbor’s yards, and the fruit trees in them.”