Leila Day | KALW

Leila Day

Reporter, Editor, Host

Leila Day is a Senior Producer at Pineapple Street Media and is the Executive Producer and co-host of The Stoop Podcast, stories about the black diaspora. Her work has been featured on NPR, 99% Invisible, the BBC as well as other outlets. Before The Stoop, she was an editor at Al Jazeera's podcast network and worked on creating and editing award winning narrative driven journalism. She began her career in journalism at KALW where she worked as a health care and criminal justice reporter. During that time she contributed as an editor, taught audio storytelling to inmates at San Quentin, and helped develop curriculum for training upcoming reporters.

Alexis Keenan

Art often shines  a light on bigger issues in neighborhoods, in our society, and in our personal lives. Local playwright, Echo Brown explores identity, empowerment, race, gender and Beyonce, in her new play "Black Virgins are not for Hipsters." 

"The whole play is me revealing myself in these intimate ways"-Echo Brown 

 

Click the audio player above to hear the entire interview. 

Buffalo Soldiers ride on

May 18, 2015
Leila Day


http://louisearonson.com

We're all getting older, so what are some ways we can embrace it better? When women hit major markers with aging, like menopause, Dr. Louise Aronson, a geriatrician and professor at UCSF, says that there is no reason to get so down about it.

Education is considered a way out of the prison system and poverty. Yet ironically, for some people education is more attainable from behind bars. Inside San Bruno Jail #5 is the Five Keys Charter school. It’s one of the nation’s first high schools within a jail, and the subject of a documentary now in production called "The Corridor."  KALW's Leila Day sat down with filmmakers Annelise Wunderlich and Richard O'Connell to learn more.

RICHARD O'CONNELL: It’s like a domino effect. Suddenly you have a different experience. And you experience that you can actually do things and get things done, and there’s hope. 

To hear the full interview, please click on the audio link above.

To learn more about the fundraising for the project click the link for their Kickstarter campaign : http://www.thecorridordocumentary.com/

Tom Levy

  Some people who take dance classes regularly have a saying: “Dance is my church.”

Dancer Stella Adelman says just that about going to Afro-Cuban folkloric dance class. “There’s a release to it,” she says. To her, it’s a place where she can reflect and find some clarity through movement. To some practitioners this clarity comes from being active and getting exercise, for others, it’s literally a spiritual practice.  

The Bay Area is home to many instructors of Afro-Cuban rhythms. Music and dance lovers come from all over the world to participate in workshops taught by some of the most loved teachers and dancers from the Cuban Diaspora. Many of them have found home here.

Alex Handy

Lots of people talk about how addicted we are to our screens. We spend our days staring at smartphones, tablets, and computers. But the first digital addiction came before most of us even imagined a home computer: video games. 

Sara Brooke Curtis

Every place has a history hidden that lives beneath what you can see on the surface. Just take the Mission District. The Bart Station at 24th street and Mission is called Plaza Sandino by some -- because in the 1980’s Pro-Sandanista protesters would rally there. Right down the street, Potrero del Sol Park is better known to those who grew up here as La Raza park -- back in the 70’s it was a major gathering spot for low rider cars. This neighborhood has also been called the birthplace of Latin Rock.

Tomorrow, voters in two key cities in the Bay Area will weigh in on measures to increase their minimum wage.  Both Oakland and San Francisco have propositions on the ballot that would increase their minimum wage to $12.25 per hour.

http://www.courtneyruby.com/meet-courtney/

Courtney Ruby is Oakland's City Auditor who now wants to be Oakland's next mayor. Ruby says her priority is public safety and since she has experience  crunching the numbers she's convinced that she can find the funds to add at least 200 more police officers on the street.  Not just any kind of officer, Ruby's rallying for more engaged officers and says she's not afraid to take a stand on tough issues.

In the past Ruby has taken on City Hall and forced the city to refund millions in overpaid parking tickets. She's known for questioning shady contracts and exposing what she calls "a broken system."

The Fog Harvester

Sep 17, 2014
Leila Day

John Lovell is holding onto a rope, easing himself down a steep drop-off.

“I’ve already fallen off it once!” Lovell yells, looking down a steep canyon called Avalon in Daly City. It’s a gusty place, with planes constantly overhead. Lovell is here to check on his harvest.    

“People ask me what I do, and I say, ‘[I] harvest fog,’ they say, ‘Harvest frogs?’” Lovell laughs.

Human trafficking is the second most profitable criminal enterprise in the world. It's estimated to rake in $32 billion per year after drug trafficking. San Francisco is one of the nation’s trafficking centers.

Leila Day

 

If you walk upstairs from the kitchen at Mother Brown’s drop-in center in the evening, you’ll find dozens of people sleeping in chairs. During the day, Mother Brown’s serves home-cooked meals to the homeless in San Francisco’s Bayview district. There are over a thousand people without homes in Bayview -- the second-highest homeless population in the city. But there’s not one shelter. So for more than a decade, Mother Brown’s has been offering chairs. Now they want to offer beds.

Leila Day


Yesterday’s 6.0 earthquake, reportedly originating along the the West Napa Fault, was felt across the Bay Area, but most of the damage was in Napa, Vallejo and the surrounding areas. 

California has one of the highest prison populations in the country. Of the two million people serving time in prisons in the U.S, more than 130,000 of them are incarcerated in our state - a system designed to house 80,000. In response to that overcrowding, the federal government has ordered the state to cut the prison population by about a quarter.

Leila Day

Re-entering after time behind bars is some of the most volatile time for recovery. A recent California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation report shows that within three years, over 60% of inmates recidivate, or re-offend, and return to prison within the first six months of their release.

 

When it comes to sending a message to the community, one way to do it is to simply stand together. That’s what one Oakland organization is doing by organizing a walk every Friday evening in some of the city’s most crime-heavy areas. Since 2012, Oakland has averaged around 860 aggravated assaults each year, with many of the incidents concentrated in East Oakland. Although these walks are organized by churches, they’ve attracted hundreds of secular participants.

www.syokkahwin.com

 

When you hear a really good speech, it’s easy to assume that the speaker has some inherent talent for it. But in fact, it’s a skill, and one organization has decided to break it down for people so they can learn it.  It’s called Toastmasters and it’s a public speaking organization that’s over 90 years old with nearly 300,000 members across the globe.

Each week, a local  branch meets downtown on Mission street. Their tagline? “Where Leaders Are Made,” and tonight there are 10 people hoping they will be the next ones.

Adelie Freyja Annabel / Under CC License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

We often hear how the rent in San Francisco is some of the priciest in the country, but there are also just not enough places for people to live.

The mayor’s office has asked city officials to speed up the lengthy permitting process in efforts to increase the housing supply. But some say that the supply already exists -- that thousands of units are simply being kept off the market. Some estimate up to 10,000 of these units exist. Many sit unrented because tenants are proving too risky an investment for some property owners.

Tearsa Joy Hammock / San Francisco Public Press

In 2011, the latest year that data is available, parents at San Francisco elementary schools collectively raised over five million dollars for their kids’ schools. More than half of that money was raised by only ten elementary schools in a district of 71.

Brian Rinker

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Leila Day


 

 

Lupita Espinoza can often be seen pushing a stroller up one of those steep San Francisco hills that many of us try to avoid. She can’t avoid it, though -- it’s the way to work.

“I am very lucky that I have a nice family -- they have been flexible with me,” she says.

She looks after two children at once, both 3-year-olds, a girl and a boy. Today she’s taken them to Precita Park, near their house, to play in the sandbox. Lupita is the little girl’s nanny; the little boy is her son, Orlando. She brings him along while she works. Since her own child is getting some of her attention, the girl’s parents pay her less than they might otherwise.

Twitter. With more than 400 million users a month, it’s the second-most-popular social network in the world. A report from the Pew Research Center's Journalism Project found that nearly ten percent of adults get their news from Twitter.

Leila Day

Not long ago there was a food fight at Ralph Bunche High School. And Angel Hernandez is in trouble. He’s 18, a senior, and he’s not admitting anything happened. He’s slouched in his chair in a circle in a room whose walls are covered with positive messages: ‘Respect,’ ‘Listen,’ ‘Trust.’ His mom, Maria Ramirez, sits at his side. Also in the circle is the cafeteria worker Miss Mina, and she looks pretty ticked off. “Everybody starts throwing stuff,” she says. “I said excuse me, how old are you guys? You guys want to clean up my kitchen?”

The many translations of Day of the Dead

Oct 31, 2013
Leila Day

If you walk down Mission Street this weekend you’ll see family members holding pictures of loved ones in one hand and candles in another. You may see ofrendas--small altars set up to pay tribute to people who have passed away. It’s a tradition that’s been present in the Mission for years, but how it’s celebrated depends on who you ask.

Tina Hayes School of Etiquette Class

California has been in an ongoing struggle trying to figure out how to deal with overcrowding in prisons. The problems extend to the Division of Juvenile Justice, where the state’s most serious young offenders are held. For youth from Alameda County, being sent to one of the DJJ facilities is one of the worst alternatives. They’re spread out all over the state, which means it can be hard to keep family connections, and complaints of abuse and unsafe conditions have dogged the system for more than a decade.

Rumba and the radio

Sep 18, 2013
Leila Day

Hog Island Oyster Company

 

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Sara Brooke Curtis

When people get into trouble with the law, they normally don’t have a chance to have a conversation with their victims. To explain what happened. Hear about the damage they caused. Say they’re sorry. But there’s a growing trend to try and make that happen, so both parties can move on.

Thingamajigs

Solvitur Ambulando is the name of the performance piece that’s part of an artist in residency program at the Berkeley Arts Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

“It translates into it ‘is solved by walking,’” says Edward Schocker, a musician and collaborator in the group. “Just constantly moving because they have to move because of political situation or adoption or because of their choosing.”

Libraries are where many people go to exercise their brains, and now there’s at least one where you can exercise your body. The 81st Avenue Branch Library in East Oakland is finding that what people want in their neighborhood is to work out. And, they didn’t have to go far to find the right instructor.

Pages