Tonya Mosley | KALW

Tonya Mosley

Tonya Mosley is the LA-based co-host of Here & Now, a midday radio show co-produced by NPR and WBUR. She's also the host of the podcast Truth Be Told.

Prior to Here & Now, Mosley served as a host and the Silicon Valley bureau chief for KQED in San Francisco. Her other experiences include senior education reporter & host for WBUR, television correspondent for Al Jazeera America and television reporter in several markets including Seattle, Wash., and Louisville, Ky.

In 2015, Mosley was awarded a John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University, where she co-created a workshop for journalists on the impact of implicit bias and co-wrote a Belgian/American experimental study on the effects of protest coverage. Mosley has won several national awards for her work, most recently an Emmy Award in 2016 for her televised piece "Beyond Ferguson," and an Edward R. Murrow award for her public radio series "Black in Seattle."

As COVID-19 deaths and illnesses mount, essential workers — who are denied the chance to work from home — are struggling to stay safe. And it's far from clear whether the federal government is doing enough to protect them, according to a former top federal workplace safety official.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration official, Deborah Berkowitz, said the Trump administration has neglected COVID-19 safety at meatpacking plants and many other workplaces.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Thousands of security forces are deploying across the country in anticipation of unrest around the inauguration. After the deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol, there have been more than a hundred arrests and a national reckoning over how seriously to take the right-wing extremist threat. NPR's Hannah Allam reports.

HANNAH ALLAM, BYLINE: If authorities in charge of protecting the U.S. Capitol say they didn't see the threat coming, then they weren't paying attention. There were warnings, like this one.