© 2021 KALW
KALW Public Media / 91.7 FM Bay Area
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Dia de los Muertos-KALW Almanac-11-2-2015

DiaDeLosMuertos.jpg

  • 306th Day of 2015 59 Remaining
  • Winter Begins in 49 Days
  • Sunrise:6:37
  • Sunset:5:09
  • 10 Hours 32 Minutes
  • Moon Rise:11:14pm
  • Moon Set:12:26pm
  • Phase:58% 21 Days
  • Next Full Moon November 25 @ 2:44pm
  • This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.
  • Tides
  • High:4:09am/2:52pm
  • Low:9:32am/9:54pm
  • Holidays
  • Traffic Directors Day
  • Cookie Monster Day
  • Job Action Day
  • Look For Circles Day
  • National Deviled Egg Day
  • Plan Your Epitaph Day
  • Pratcice Being psychic Day
  •  
  • Dia De Los Muertos/Day Of The Dead-Mexico
  • On This Day
  • 1777 --- The USS Ranger, with a crew of 140 men under the command of John Paul Jones, leaves Portsmouth, New Hampshire, for the naval port at Brest, France, where it will stop before heading toward the Irish Sea to begin raids on British warships. This was the first mission of its kind during the Revolutionary War.
    FirstSalute.jpg
  • 1867 --- The first issue of “Harper’s Bazaar” magazine was published.
    harpers-bazaar-1867.jpg
  • 1902 --- Engineer Andrew Riker delivers the first four-cylinder, gas-powered Locomobile—a $4,000, 12-horsepower Model C—to a buyer in New York City on this day in 1902. The Locomobile Company had been known for building heavy, powerful steam cars, but by the turn of the century it was clear that the future of the automobile—and thus of the Locomobile—lay in the internal-combustion engine. Until it went out of business in 1929, the company built elegant, luxurious touring-cars and streamlined racers for wealthy patrons. A Locomobile, ads crowed, was the “Best Built Car in America.”
    advert501.jpg
  • 1917 --- British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour submits a declaration of intent to establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine. The British government hoped that the formal declaration would help garner Jewish support for the Allied effort in World War I. The Balfour Declaration was included in the British mandate over Palestine, which was approved by the League of Nations in 1922. Arabs opposed the Balfour Declaration, fearing that the creation of a Jewish homeland would mean the subjugation of Arab Palestinians.
    balfour.jpg
  • 1920 --- The first commercial radio station in the U.S., KDKA of Pittsburgh, PA, began regular broadcasting. 
    151187-004-69A6EE9F.jpg
  • 1930 --- Haile Selassie was crowned emperor of Ethiopia.
    36b.jpg
  • 1947 --- The Hughes Flying Boat—the largest aircraft ever built—is piloted by designer Howard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the massive wooden aircraft had a wingspan longer than a football field and was designed to carry more than 700 men to battle. Following the U.S. entrance into World War II in 1941, the U.S. government commissioned the Hughes Aircraft Company to build a large flying boat capable of carrying men and materials over long distances. The concept for what would become the “Spruce Goose” was originally conceived by the industrialist Henry Kaiser, but Kaiser dropped out of the project early, leaving Hughes and his small team to make the H-4 a reality. Because of wartime restrictions on steel, Hughes decided to build his aircraft out of wood laminated with plastic and covered with fabric. Although it was constructed mainly of birch, the use of spruce (along with its white-gray color) would later earn the aircraft the nickname Spruce Goose. It had a wingspan of 320 feet and was powered by eight giant propeller engines.
    Hughes-Aircraft-H-4-Hercules-NX37602-2-November-1947.jpg
  • 1948 --- Harry S. Truman defeated Thomas E. Dewey for the U.S. presidency. TheChicago Tribune published an early edition that had the headline "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN." The Truman victory surprised many polls and newspapers.
    e76a4340fd819430.jpg
  • 1959 --- Charles Van Doren admitted to a House subcommittee that he had the questions and answers in advance of his appearances on the TV game show "Twenty-One."
    van-doren-appearing-before-thea-house-subcommitee.jpg
  • 1960 --- A landmark obscenity case over Lady Chatterley’s Lover, by D.H. Lawrence, ends in the acquittal of Penguin Books. The publisher had been sued for obscenity in publishing an unexpurgated version of Lawrence’s novel, which deals with the affair between the wife of a wealthy, paralyzed landowner and his estate’s gamekeeper. The book had been published in a limited English-language edition in Florence in 1928 and Paris the following year. An expurgated version was published in England in 1932. In 1959, the full text was published in New York, then in London the following year.
    151102-chatterley.jpg
  • 1963 --- Following the overthrow of his government by South Vietnamese military forces the day before, President Ngo Dinh Diem and his brother are captured and killed by a group of soldiers. The death of Diem caused celebration among many people in South Vietnam, but also lead to political chaos in the nation. The United States subsequently became more heavily involved in Vietnam as it tried to stabilize the South Vietnamese government and beat back the communist rebels that were becoming an increasingly powerful threat. While the United States publicly disclaimed any knowledge of or participation in the planning of the coup that overthrew Diem, it was later revealed that American officials met with the generals who organized the plot and gave them encouragement to go through with their plans.
    2086-ngo-dinh-diem.jpg
  • 1967 --- President Johnson holds a secret meeting with some of the nation’s most prestigious leaders, who were collectively called “the Wise Men.” This group included former Secretary of State Dean Acheson, General of the Army Omar Bradley, Ambassador-at-Large Averell Harriman, and former Ambassador to South Vietnam Henry Cabot Lodge. Johnson asked them for advice on how to unite the U.S. in the Vietnam War effort. They reached the conclusion that the administration needed to offer “ways of guiding the press to show the light at the end of the tunnel.” In effect, they decided that the American people should be given more optimistic reports.
    c0139575_21161378.gif
  • 1974 --- George Harrison began his first tour in eight years. He was the first former Beatle to attempt a nationwide solo tour. 
    C10.jpg
  • 1976 --- Former Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter defeated Republican incumbent Gerald R. Ford, becoming the first U.S. president from the Deep South since the Civil War.
    1102_big.gif
  • 1978 --- The Police released the debut album "Outlandos d'Amour."
    51AVpDlr4WL.jpg
  • 1982 --- A truck explodes in the Salang Tunnel in Afghanistan, killing an estimated 3,000 people, mostly Soviet soldiers traveling to Kabul. The Soviet Union’s military foray into Afghanistan was disastrous by nearly every measure, but perhaps the worst single incident was the Salang Tunnel explosion in 1982. A long army convoy was traveling from Russia to Kabul through the border city of Hairotum. The route took the convoy through the Salang Tunnel, which is 1.7 miles long, 25 feet high and approximately 17 feet wide. The tunnel, one of the world’s highest at an altitude of 11,000 feet, was built by the Soviets in the 1970s. The Soviet army kept a tight lid on the story, but it is believed that an army vehicle collided with a fuel truck midway through the long tunnel. About 30 buses carrying soldiers were immediately blown up in the resulting explosion.
    7.jpg
  • 1983 --- President Ronald Reagan signs a bill in the White House Rose Garden designating a federal holiday honoring Martin Luther King, Jr., to be observed on the third Monday of January.
    reagan_mlk.jpg
  • 1986 --- Norwegian distance runner Grete Waitz wins her eighth New York City marathon. She finished the 26-mile, 385-yard course in 2:28.6, more than a mile ahead of the second- and third-place women in the race. Waitz had won her first marathon in New York in 1978—setting a world record–and she won the NYC marathon again in 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984 and 1985. In 1988, she won it for the ninth time—something no runner had ever done in any marathon.
    1313270.jpg
  • Birthdays
  • Daniel Boone
  • Marie Antoinette
  • Warren G Harding (29th President)
  • James K Polk (11th President)
  • Maurice Blondel
  • Burt Lancaster
  • Ray Walston
  • Ann Rutherford
  • Earl “Speedo” Carroll
  • Shere Hite
  • Stefanie Powers
  • kd Lang
  • Nelly
  • David Schwimmer