Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

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Bo Walsh

Gabriel Ramirez and his team of coaches at Pro Wrestling Revolution in San Jose teach the artform and traditions of professional wrestling to a new generation of hopefuls chasing their dreams in the squared circle.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

Trinity County isn't in the news much, unless it’s wildfire season. It’s beautiful, remote, and rural. It’s also one of the state’s most food insecure places, where many people don’t know where their next meal is coming from. The county’s food bank director delivers food to the region’s most isolated — and hungry — residents.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

The West Side of San Bernardino is one of those neighborhoods where people still live in the houses their Mexican-American great-grandparents bought in the 1930s. Today, on the once-thriving commercial strip, there are plenty of vacant lots and storefronts, but one business is still a magnet for customers: the Mitla Cafe. It’s proof that sometimes a restaurant is more than just a restaurant. Since the ‘30s, the restaurant has born witness to and played a role in political change. It also happens to be an unlikely inspiration for how mainstream America sees — and eats — Mexican food.

Honoring Jerry Garcia's little-known past with Jerry Day

Jul 24, 2018
Used by permission from CC Flickr account humboldthead

 

You might expect that a Jerry Garcia-themed event in San Francisco would be founded by a Deadhead. You know, a stereotypical Grateful Dead mega-fan who followed the band around the country for years, dropping acid, wearing tie-dye, and talking about world peace.

J. Stephen Conn via Flickr, used under CC BY-NC 2.0 / Resized and cropped

California is facing another showdown with the Trump administration. This time over offshore drilling. As part of a state-wide, multi-station project based here at KALW, we asked you to share your thoughts.

Bo Walsh


If you’ve ever attended a professional sporting event, there’s a good chance at some point you have found yourself rising to your feet with hands raised in rhythm with thousands of other fans. It’s a phenomenon known simply as “the Wave. ”

courtesy of StoryCorps

Jessica Stillman and Amanda Abud are counselors at the Verity crisis center in Santa Rosa. The Tubbs wildfire, the most destructive the state has seen, incinerated almost 37,000 acres in Northern California. In this interview, Jessica and Amanda talk about how hard it was to leave Santa Rosa during the fires instead of staying to help counsel at shelters.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

 

Right now, there are backpackers crossing into Canada after five months of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. They're called thru-hikers, and they started the trail in Mexico and will traverse 2,650 miles. Now, the lazy among us might have just read "Wild," Cheryl Strayed's memoir about the Pacific Crest Trail. The even lazier among us may be waiting for the movie to come out in December. The hikers who actually make this trek see toenails fall off and their feet can swell whole shoe sizes. They say the only thing they talk about more than their feet is food.

kgroovy / Flikr Creative Commons

 

The Shipyard is supposed to be San Francisco’s biggest redevelopment project since the 1906 earthquake. It’s slated to have affordable housing, office and retail space, and parks. But this year, the shipyard development has been infamously dubbed “The biggest case of eco fraud in US history.”

Hana Baba

 

The Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban preventing nationals from 5 majority-Muslim countries, plus North Korea and Venezuela, from entering the US. The administration put the policy in place to "protect US citizens from terrorist attacks and other public-safety threats," but many are referring to it simply as a “Muslim ban.” Amal Alaoudi shares how the ban has affected life for her and her family.

quinn norton from Excellent Question, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

When the travel ban was first announced, many people were outraged — nationally and here in the Bay Area. At SFO, people brought signs and stood in the arrivals hall chanting to make their point against the ban. Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the ban, it’s become harder for activists, human rights lawyers, and community organizers to help those affected by it.

Bay Area Beats: DJ QBERT

Jul 19, 2018
Bo Walsh

 

Richard Quitevis is better known as DJ QBERT. He's been a pioneer in the art of DJ turntablism for close to 30 years.

Courtesy of Josiah Luís Alderete

Josiah Luís Alderete will tell you he is “a full-blooded Pocho Indio who refries his beans and poesia in Spanglish.”

Finding a personal relationship with God in jail

Jul 18, 2018
Courtesy of Oscar

 

Our ongoing series The Spiritual Edge occasionally spotlights stories about how people have found their own personal religious beliefs. Today’s story profiles an Uber driver named Oscar from Napa. He didn’t grow up particularly religious, but during a months-long incarceration, he found the Bible that would change his life.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs / KALW News

 

In the past few weeks, the Bay Area has had one protest after another over the country’s immigration policies. There were thousands of people who took to the streets to march in protest of family separation.

Order 9066: Objects of Incarceration

Jul 17, 2018
Courtesy of American Public Media

This is an excerpt from “Order 9066,” a podcast from American Public Media and the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

What’s happening today to immigrants seeking asylum or refuge in the United States has many thinking about another time, a time when another population was incarcerated in this country in the name of national security. The time was World War Two, and the people were Japanese Americans.

Public Domain

As thousands of migrant children wait to be reunited with their parents, images of them in detention centers continue to rock the country. Poet and activist Tongo Eisen-Martin traveled to McAllen, Texas to see what was happening for himself.

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

The new Transbay Transit Center opens next month in San Francisco. It’s meant to connect buses from the East Bay with MUNI, Caltrain, and High-Speed Rail. The only problem? The tunnel connecting Caltrain to the transit center hasn’t been built yet. The tunnel will be less than miles long, but building it will cost $4 billion dollars, on top of the $2.2 billion already spent on the transit center.

Hey Area: What is the Emergency Alert System testing?

Jul 17, 2018
Christine Nguyen / KALW News

You ask, we answer.

One listener wanted to know, “What is this ‘test of the emergency system we hear now and then on the air?” Reporter Christine Nguyen has the answer.

Hey Area: Why doesn't BART go to Marin?

Jul 17, 2018
Wikimedia user Utilizer, used under CC BY-SA 4.0 / resized and cropped

KALW listener Lori from El Cerrito wrote in to ask why BART doesn’t go to Marin.

Tobias Kleinlercher / Wikipedia, used under CC BY-SA 3.0 / cropped

San Francisco’s Bush and Pine Streets efficiently get drivers from Point A to B. Or as some like to say, “From Bush to the Bay, Pine to the Pacific.” KALW listener Steve Greenberg wanted to know when these two streets became one-way. But more importantly, why?

Truc Nguyen

 

Almost 60 years ago, the City of San Francisco named a unique street Brotherhood Way. On the south-side of Brotherhood Way, there’s a row of churches and faith-based institutions.

Flikr user Rusty Blazenhoff used underUNDER CC BY-NC 2.0 / CROPPED AND RESIZED

When recreational cannabis was legalized in California just over six months ago, the people championing legal weed had high hopes. Growers could emerge out of the shadows into the light. People arrested during the War on Drugs could become CEOs of cannabis empires. Millions of dollars worth of tax revenue would ooze out of marijuana plants right into the government’s pockets. But cannabis trade groups also warned regulations would push some people out.

Gen Fujitani

Last month in San Francisco, an estimated 30,000 people protested against President Trump’s zero-tolerance immigration policy, which has led to the incarceration and separation of children from their parents.

One particularly vocal group at the protest: Japanese Americans, part of the group Nikkei Resistors. 

Courtesty of Catholic Charities

We’ve heard about kids sent to camps and detention facilities and we’ve seen the images of children in cages, wrapped up in foil blankets. One question we’ve been asking is—what happens to them after detention?

Courtesy of Kev Choice

Pianist, composer, and MC Kev Choice represents Oakland hard. He started learning the piano in seventh grade at Westlake Junior High near Lake Merritt and recently composed a piece for the Oakland Symphony. Though he’s done stints in Illinois, New Orleans, and Atlanta, he considers the Town his artistic and spiritual home.

Courtesy of Oakland Zoo

A few months ago the Oakland Zoo rescued three orphaned mountain lions cubs from the wild. They are part of a new exhibit called the California Trail that opens tomorrow. It’s a huge expansion that features our state’s native wildlife.

Oakland is gearing up for a major election

Jul 11, 2018
Cate Calson, used under CC BY-ND 2.0 / Resized and cropped / Red Cross Bay Area Chapter

San Francisco just wrapped up an intense mayoral election. There’s another major race for mayor coming up. This time in Oakland.

Marisol Medina-Cadena / KALW News

 

A new generation of Oakland-raised Maya are working to give their communities a voice in their native tongues.

Gabrielle Lurie / San Francisco Chronicle

 

As the nation has been following for weeks now, thousands of migrant children coming to the United States are separated from their families at the Southern border.

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