WWII | KALW

WWII

Segregation During The Era Of Rosie The Riveter

Sep 11, 2019
From the Storycorps booth

If you've ever visited the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park on the Richmond waterfront, chances are you have heard of its most celebrated ranger.

On this edition of Your Call, Akemi Johnson will discuss her new book Night in the American Village: Women in the Shadow of the US Military Bases in Okinawa.

Almost 75 years since the US first occupied the Japanese island, it still has 32 military bases there.  Over 50,000 American military members, contractors, and their families live on the island. Akemi explores the wounds of US-Japanese history and the cultural and sexual politics of the US military empire. 

 

Guest:

Philosophy Talk: Heidegger

Apr 24, 2018

Martin Heidegger has been hailed by many as the greatest philosopher of the twentieth century. He has also been criticized for being both nearly unreadable and a Nazi.


Photo courtesy of the Nation Parks/modified from original

For the past decade 96-year-old Betty Reid Soskin has served as the nation’s oldest Park Ranger 

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Tanforan

Feb 20, 2018
Dorothea Lange / cropped and resized

All week long, we played this sound and asked you to guess what exactly it was and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Richmond's real life Rosie-the-Riveters

Aug 30, 2016
The Betty Reid Soskin Pages

During World War II, the city of Richmond quadrupled in size when about 70,000 workers flocked to work at the shipyards that dotted the bay’s shoreline.

Photo by Mary Rees.

San Francisco is the city of the Summer of Love – a place famous for peace rallies and liberal politics. So, a newcomer to the Bay Area may well feel confused at the number of forts and military bunkers clustered around the Golden Gate.

Until recently, large parcels of land in San Francisco and northward, in the Marin Headlands, belonged to the army — which was charged with protecting what was then the west coast’s most important port.

Marianne Gillmer was born in Germany during World War II. Growing up in her village during those tragic years was tough on her family, especially after her father died in battle. She was aware of death at a young age, but she and her best friend still found ways to remain playful and adventurous. In this story, she tells her daughter Susan about one of her most peculiar playgrounds – the local cemetery.