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wildfire

Buzz Andersen / Flicker Creative Commons

Pacific Gas & Electric began restoring power Thursday to some of the 120,000 people it intentionally blacked out to ease the risk of catastrophic wildfires.

A Year After Deadly Fire, Paradise Pauses To Remember

Nov 8, 2019
Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

Paradise paused on Friday.

One year after the most devastating wildfire in California history mostly destroyed the town, local officials asked people to pause for 85 seconds beginning at 11:08 a.m. — one second for every person who was killed.

Courtesy of Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

California is getting an energy czar. That’s according to Governor Gavin Newsom, who announced a big re-shaping of the utility company PG&E in response to the state’s ongoing wildfire crisis. 

Marissa Ortega-Welch / KALW

Meet a maverick fire chief in the Sierra Nevada who says California’s forests are actually not having enough fire, or, the right kind of fires.

Angela Johnston

The Camp Fire in Northern California is now the deadliest and most destructive fire in California history. For most Californians, this milestone is starting to sound all too familiar.

B.F., used under CC0 1.0 / cropped / Wikimedia Commons

The Camp fire in Butte County burned down more than 15 thousand structures. Evacuation centers are filling up. The town of Paradise suffered a huge portion of the devastation: death and destruction.

How are firefighters battling California's deadly fires?

Nov 13, 2018
Photo by Joshua Stevens / NASA Earth Observatory

On this special segment of Your Call, we get an update from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection on the deadly and destructive wildfires in California that have so far claimed 42 lives and forced more than 250,000 people to flee their homes. 

Cal OES

A massive wildfire that started over a week ago in the hills of Yolo and Napa counties is now 73 percent contained.

Just over 100 miles north of San Francisco, residents of Lower Lake are cleaning up their devastated community. The Clayton Fire, a suspected arson, destroyed nearly 300 structures. It’s the second time in less than a year that people living in Lake County have suffered from a blaze.

Photo courtesy Cal_OES (Flickr)

It’s been 18 days since the Valley Fire ignited, and in some places the burning continues. But this week students returned to school, despite, in many cases, having no home to return to.


  The Valley Fire in Lake County is one for the record books. While there have been larger fires in terms of size -- like the huge one now burning in Fresno County -- the Valley Fire now ranks as the third worst fire in state history, based on total structures burned. And at least four people have died.