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On this edition of Your Call, we're discussing Donald Trump’s attempted coup as thousands of pro-Trump extremists violently breached the nation’s Capitol yesterday, while Congress was in the process of certifying the election results. Last night, after the riots, 147 Republicans still voted to challenge Joe Biden's victory. What questions do you have about the mob violence we saw yesterday?

REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  On this edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss COVID's fall surge. According to the Covid Tracking Project, the US is averaging 48,000 new cases a day, the highest numbers since mid-August.

SnappyGoat

On Wednesday, California's Employment Development Department said that it has cleared about 250,000 of over 1.6 million unprocessed unemployment claims.

What Will It Take To Tackle The COVID Economic Crisis & Growing Inequality?

Sep 15, 2020
NYT Mag / Brenda Ann Kenneally

  On this edition of Your Call, we’re speaking with former Labor Secretary Robert Reich about the economic crisis and growing inequality. As of mid-August, more than 29 million Americans were receiving some sort of unemployment insurance.

Struggling Ballpark Workers To Protest Outside Tonight's SF Giants Game

Aug 25, 2020
SF Examiner

On this edition of Your Call, we’re discussing escalating protests against the SF Giants. Unemployed Oracle ballpark workers say the SF Giants refuse to negotiate as they struggle to make ends meet. About 1,000 concession workers with UNITE HERE Local 2 are employed by the Bon Appetit Management Company, the Giants’ food service subcontractor.

Shandana Qazi/S.F. Examiner

  

On this edition of Your Call, we're discussing how the loss of additional unemployment benefits is impacting people who are struggling. Two months ago, House Democrats passed a bill to extend the extra $600 a week in federal benefits. Republicans want to reduce benefits to $200 a week.

The Fight To Extend The $600 Weekly Unemployment Benefit

Jul 22, 2020

  On this edition of Your Call, we’re discussing the struggle to make ends meet as COVID cases continue to surge in 40 states. Around 33 million Americans are now jobless.

COVID's Mental Health Crisis: What Resources Are Available?

Jul 15, 2020
ALEXANDER POSSINGHAM/UNSPLASH


  On this edition of Your Call, we discuss the pandemic’s mental health toll. More than 30% of adults in the US reported symptoms of anxiety or depression, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation poll.

Anne Wernikoff / Calmatters


On this edition of Your Call, we'll find out what’s being done to prevent a massive eviction crisis from happening across the country. A backlog of eviction cases is already moving through the court system and it could get worse as unemployment benefits run out.

What Should A 21st Century Post-Pandemic New Deal Look Like?

May 14, 2020
Library of Congress. New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection / World Telegram staff photographer

On this edition of Your Call, we’re speaking with Gray Brechin and Richard Walker, board members of the Living New Deal, a project that makes the legacy of the New Deal visible and educates Americans about what is possible when government is dedicated to the public good.

Charles Krupa/AP

On this edition of Your Call, we're speaking with Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz about how the US government has handled the COVID-19 crisis. He says the public safety net is not working and the US is on course for a second Great Depression.

Why Former Cigna VP Wendell Potter Now Supports Medicare For All

Apr 8, 2020
Associated Press

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll speak with Wendell Potter, a whistleblower and former VP of Cigna, about how the COVID-19 crisis is exposing our broken public health system and the failures of private health insurance.

With Unemployment On The Rise, How Will The $2.2T Bill Bring Relief?

Mar 31, 2020
Bryan Anselm for The New York Times


 

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll take your questions about the $2.2 trillion stimulus package.


  In breathless mainstream coverage of national crises, the realities on the ground are being lost, says journalist Charlie Leduff.

Nicholas Eberstadt, author of the new book, Men without Work. reports that there is a large new, underdiscussed population of unemployed men not counted in the unemployment statistics because they’ve given up looking for work.  We’ll discuss what individuals and society can do. 

FSFSF: Jessica Sele on unemployment

Apr 30, 2015


Still struggling with your career? On the March 15, 2015 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, I devote the entire hour to Workovers: You can call in with whatever career conundrum is besetting you and I'll try to help.

Work with Marty Nemko is heard every Sunday from 11 AM to noon on 91.7 FM and is archived for a week on NPR.org and iTunes, and in perpetuity here on KALW.org.

Under CC license from Flickr user Patrick

A majority of Americans say their biggest financial concern is that they won’t be able to save enough money to retire. This finding, by a recent Gallup poll, is likely one reason that the average age of retirement in America has increased from 60 to 62 years old since the 2008 recession. For many people, though, retiring in their 60s simply isn’t possible.

Sukey Lewis

Sky-high rents, Google buses and gentrification are all buzzwords around the Bay Area. But that is not the case in the city of Richmond. With unemployment at 10.1 percent, the city of more than a hundred thousand residents stubbornly trails behind the rates of Bay Area neighbors like San Francisco and Berkeley.  

On the April 27, 2014 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, a second long-form conversation with Robert Reich, Secretary of Labor in the Clinton Administration and advisor to the Obama Administration.  We discuss employment issues of the day: income inequality, minimum wage, and a spirited exchange on the wisdom of using Disparate Impact to abet minority employment.  We also had a fun exchange about career and life lessons from our early life. 

A day in the life of the underemployed

Mar 12, 2014
David Boyer & Audrey Dilling

After years working in low-paying-but-rewarding social service jobs, Delynn Parker went back to school to get her Masters in Psychology. She had high hopes for more opportunities and better compensation after she graduated. That is not how it worked out. She is now saddled with a huge student loan and has found it difficult to find full-time work in her chosen field. Parker shared a day in her life – from her morning commute to her early bed time – giving insight into being underemployed in the Bay Area.

Liz Mak

 

San Francisco currently has the third lowest unemployment rate of all California's counties. But while that’s good news, it doesn't mean that much if you’re one of the more than 23,000 San Franciscans still finding it difficult to get work.

Bridging the Opportunity Divide in the Bay Area

Jun 18, 2013

What happens to young people in the Bay Area with no college degree? How can they navigate a labor market that demands high tech skills without adequate education or training? Producer and guest host Victoria Thorp and guests explore new strategies for addressing the opportunity divide in the Bay Area.

Guests:

Shrinking the skills gap for unemployed young adults

Aug 15, 2012
Sayre Quevedo, Youth Radio

Even with almost 13 million Americans out of work, companies still complain that they have open positions that go unfilled because they can’t find the right talent. One organization thinks it’s found a solution to the skills gap problem. It’s helping young people who have a high school diploma or GED find jobs in growing sectors of the economy like technology and high finance.

Two years ago Breyana Scales says she was stuck between a dead end job painting kids’ faces at a theme park while trying to get through college.

Looking for work with a criminal record

Jul 19, 2012

With a Presidential election looming, the issue of the day is still the economy. California has the third highest unemployment rate in the nation, and that just counts people who are actively looking for work. It doesn’t include those who’ve been looking longer than four weeks, or the folks who are so discouraged that they’ve given up altogether.

Independent workers seek communal workspaces

Jun 18, 2012
Irene Florez

Instead of working alone, independent workers—freelancers, contractors, independent consultants and temps—are increasingly joining co-working spaces. These are collaborative work environments where independents can rent desk and meeting space down to the hour. Roughly like a gym membership, at co-working spaces, you pack your laptop instead of your sweats.

In Oakland, 2012 is the boom year for formally expanding the prevailing cubicle-centered notions of work and worker archetypes. By the end of the year, Oakland will have at least four formal co-working spaces. 

Photo by Chaz Hubbard

When Shannon Mills left her job as the director of a nonprofit in Berkeley, California about five months ago, she didn’t know what her next job would be. After freelancing for awhile, she decided to hunt for something more permanent.

“I started putting in applications and you know how the job market is …it was just crickets on the other end. People weren’t even telling me thank you for applying,” she said. That routine can become demoralizing. Mills switched up her strategy, migrating her search for work to TaskRabbit.com.

Courtesy of Flikr user Sunset Parkerpix

Close to 100,000 jobless Californians will lose as many as 20 weeks of federal unemployment insurance benefits by the end of May. Improvements in California’s economy and a drop in the unemployment rate will end an extension of federal benefits. At an Employment Development Department on Franklin and Turk, KALW’s Angela Johnston spoke to Little Vila, John Saunders, Maurice Gonzales and Yvette, who wouldn’t give her last name. Here are their thoughts on being unemployed in today’s economy:

Three years ago, we aired a piece about Caffe Delle Stelle in Hayes Valley, San Francisco. The café was changing up its menu to fit the times – the economic downturn was beginning to slow the flow of lunchtime customers, so it formulated an economy meal. KALW’s Laura Klivans spoke with then-server Flori Mashmeyer, who said the restaurant’s ten-dollar soup or salad and pasta dish was bringing in “a lot more business.”

Work with Marty Nemko

Apr 22, 2012

Barbara Nemko and I read scenes from famous plays that addressed work issues: Death of a Salesman, Prisoner of Second Avenue, Pygmalion. That led to a discussion of the nearly unprecedented plight of today's job seekers. An Associated Press analysis reported on April 22, 2012 found that HALF of new college graduates are unemployed or underemployed. Here's the link: http://www.theledger.com/article/20120422/NEWS/120429784/1410?p=1&tc=pg. I also did three-minute Workovers on callers.

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