Travel Ban | KALW

Travel Ban

Photo by John Orvis

 


 

On this edition of next Your Call, listen to our conversation about building solidarity across communities to protect civil rights and liberties.

Photo by James Tourtellotte / U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

 On this edition of Your Call, we discuss how the Trump administration is closing the door on immigrants.

Hana Baba

 

The Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban preventing nationals from 5 majority-Muslim countries, plus North Korea and Venezuela, from entering the US. The administration put the policy in place to "protect US citizens from terrorist attacks and other public-safety threats," but many are referring to it simply as a “Muslim ban.” Amal Alaoudi shares how the ban has affected life for her and her family.

quinn norton from Excellent Question, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

When the travel ban was first announced, many people were outraged — nationally and here in the Bay Area. At SFO, people brought signs and stood in the arrivals hall chanting to make their point against the ban. Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the ban, it’s become harder for activists, human rights lawyers, and community organizers to help those affected by it.

This Stanford grad student was one of the first Trump travel-ban detainees

Aug 28, 2017
"JFK Protest" by CC Flickr User Gabriel F, resized and recropped

Nisrin Elamin Abdelrahman is a Stanford doctoral student in anthropology. A citizen of Sudan, she was flying back to the United States from her academic field work when President Trump issued the first iteration of his travel ban.