transportation | KALW

transportation

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

 

A massive, multi-year transit project is transforming International Boulevard in Oakland — and financial aid for local businesses affected by the project is tangled up in red tape.

 

Eli Wirtschafter

Activist Lateefah Simon ran for the BART Board of Directors, and won, in part because of the killing of Oscar Grant. She’s now helping the agency navigate troubled waters following the killing by BART police of another young, unarmed black man — Sahleem Tindle.

Joe Fitz of SF Examiner

Yesterday, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a resolution to formally oppose a state bill which is being called the most controversial housing bill in decades. The Transit-Rich Housing Bonus, if passed, would force cities and counties to allow for dense and tall housing near public transit—no matter what local laws say. Here’s why San Francisco leaders are putting up such a fight against it. 

Eli Wirtschafter

AC Transit is building a faster, more reliable bus line on International Boulevard in East Oakland. But some locals are worried that the project will be one more thing forcing them out of the city.

Scorched cars and free bus rides in fire's aftermath

Oct 19, 2017
Ninna Gaensler-Debs

The North Bay fires — on top of claiming lives, homes, and businesses — also claimed vehicles. Crosscurrents host Hana Baba talked with KALW's transportation reporter Eli Wirtschafter about next steps for people who lost their cars in the wildfires.

What does Trump mean for transportation in the Bay Area?

Feb 23, 2017
Eli Wirtschafter

President Trump has promised to rebuild America’s transportation network. He’s also signed an executive order saying he’ll take away funding from sanctuary cities -- places like San Francisco and Oakland that don’t fully cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

Eli Wirtschafter

 

This is Part 4 of a four-part series about high-speed rail in California. Part 1: First Stop, Fresno. Part 2: Corn nuts and the bullet train. Part 3: Will the train be affordable?. Part 4: San Jose to San Francisco — easier said than done. Listen to the whole show: Inside High-Speed Rail.   

Rod Diridon Sr. says his favorite song is “Ol’ Man River.”

The song is “about persevering against great odds, when the deck was stacked against you,” says the former Santa Clara County supervisor. “And wanting to be like that old man river that just keeps rolling along.”

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

In a sun-filled classroom at an Oakland high school, a room full of adults are learning English.

Will free buses help kids get to school?

Oct 12, 2016

 

Nidya Baez is an assistant principal at Fremont High School in Oakland. She used to bring extra cash to school, in case a student asked for bus money.

“I would hear, ‘Can I get a dollar to get on the bus?’” remembers Baez.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, June 30, 2016

Jun 30, 2016
"San Francisco China Town” by Flickr user Loïc Lagarde, used under CC / Resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Crime: In rare occurrence, big three Bay Area cities see similar midyear homicide counts // San Jose Mercury News

"Halfway through the year, the homicide numbers of the Bay Area's three largest cities have reached a rare occurrence: They're nearly the same.

By Tony Webster/ under CC license/ cropped and resized

 

When I started asking people about their dream transit system for the Bay Area, a lot of people said they want transit to be more convenient. My friend Chris Quines – everyone calls him Burd – plays in punk bands.

 

Eli Wirtschafter

 

The VTA Flex pilot program ended on July 1. VTA's Chief Technology Officer Gary Miskell says they are examining other ways to deploy on-demand transit. When we reported on Flex, the challenges in providing such transit were already visible. 

Moises Olmedo, a software engineer, used to leave 50 minutes to get to work by public transit. He would walk or bike to the light rail station, wait for the train, ride for 20 minutes, and then walk the rest of the way to his job at Cisco. All this despite living just three miles away.

Bonnie Chan

Chris Peeples is president of the AC Transit Board of Directors. He takes the bus to get to work and to doctor’s appointments; he had a stroke five years ago and doesn’t walk easily, even with a cane. In the last year, his professional and medical lives have collided in an unexpected way.

March 14, 2016:   Host Joseph Pace dives into proposals to eliminate both the 4th and Mission rail yard and the end of I-280.  

Wonderlane / flickr

 

On the November 17th edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss planning for a growing Bay Area. 

Exploring the city through SF Trolley Dances

Oct 14, 2015

San Francisco is a city known for a lot of things: cable cars, political activism, a vibrant arts scene. One annual event has been bringing these things together for 12 years now.

Shawn Clover/Flikr

Here is what is happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW News:

Right to die: California Gov. Jerry Brown signs law //San Jose Mercury News

“Granting terminally ill patients the right to end their lives with a doctor's help, Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday signed the End of Life Option Act, a measure that triggered personal and passionate conflict across the state -- and in the conscience of the governor himself.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Sep 16, 2015
Youtube / SFGate

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:

SFMTA says it needs $21 billion for next 20 years // SF Examiner

"Money makes transit go ’round. And in San Francisco, a new number has been identified to do just that: $21 billion.

The Upshot: Fire on the 57 Bus in Oakland

Jun 16, 2015
Katy Grannan for The New York Times

In November 2013, agender teenager Sasha Fleischman was riding the 57 bus home from school when teenager Richard Thomas set Fleischman’s skirt on fire. Fleischman went to the hospital for 23 days; Thomas went to prison for 7 years. In a recent New York Times magazine article, journalist Dashka Slater explores the lives and motivations of both these teenagers.

 Years ago, private jitneys roamed up and down Mission Street collecting passengers, as an alternative to MUNI. Within the last few months, three new companies, Chariot, Leap and Loup, began offering shuttle services in San Francisco, though at least one recently suspended operations.  Are these new services siphoning riders, and therefore money, from MUNI?  Are they elitist, as many claim?  And how will they impact the bigger transportation picture in San Francisco?  Host Joseph Pace looks at the politics and impacts of these upscale jitneys.

Guests:

Daily news roundup for Thursday, May 21, 2015

May 21, 2015
Mike Koozmin/The S.F. Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

SF schools are developing computer science curriculum for all grade levels // SF Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

It's Time To Overturn the State Ban on Rent Control // East Bay Express

"...A twenty-year-old state law known as the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act blocks Oakland and other California cities from adopting sensible rent control rules that could help keep rent prices from getting even higher.

On the March 13, 2015 edition of 99% Invisible:

Isabel Angell

Part of getting older means you can’t get around like you used to. Maybe you can’t drive a car anymore, or hike up those big San Francisco hills to catch the bus.

At about 1:30am, after a night out with friends, Kyle Nichols-Schmolze is waiting for the AC Transit 800 bus near Market and Van Ness in San Francisco’s Civic Center.

Isabel Angell

East Bay bus agency AC Transit doesn’t have the ridership or wide-reaching reputation of BART or San Francisco’s Muni. But about 100,000 people take an AC Transit bus every day-- and those riders are disproportionately lower-income, elderly, and less likely to own a car.

Over the past few years, the AC Transit has seen deep service cuts and major fare increases. At two dollars and ten cents, it’s the Bay Area’s most expensive most expensive local bus ride.

Isabel Angell

Over half of Bay Area residents support a ban on transit strikes, bucking the region’s pro-union reputation, reveals a new Field Poll. The rest of the state is split, but more Californians still believe public transit workers should have the right to strike.

AC Transit board to vote on new fare structure

Dec 11, 2013

AC Transit’s Board of Directors will vote on a new fare structure today that would raise some fares. Local advocates are protesting the increase, saying it disproportionately affects lower-income riders and other vulnerable groups.  

The new fare structure --which would go into effect this summer-- would get rid of transfers in favor of day passes and raising the price for youth and senior monthly passes from $20 to $23. Meanwhile, the adult monthly pass would drop in price from $80 to $75.

Isabel Angell

Talks between Bay Area bus agency AC Transit and the union that represents its drivers and dispatchers are continuing after California governor Jerry Brown stopped halted a strike last week with a 60-day cooling-off period. ATU Local 192 had been threatening a strike that would shut down bus lines across the East Bay from Richmond to Fremont.

BART is back!

Oct 22, 2013

BART service has resumed as of 4am Tuesday.  Having reached a tentative agreement, train service has resumed.  Expect limited capacity for the morning commute, with full service by afternoon.  Supplemental transit service remains available.

Pages