sudan | KALW

sudan

AP Photos

  On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss the violent and deadly attacks on peaceful protesters in Khartoum, Sudan. According to the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors, security forces killed at least 108 people. There are also widespread reports of raping, looting and beatings by government paramilitary forces. What’s next for Sudan?

Minnah Awad

 

 

On Tuesday, around 40 people gathered on the steps of San Francisco City Hall in a demonstration protesting the Sudanese military’s brutal crackdown on peaceful protesters on June 3. The demonstrators had been camping out at a sit-in in the capital, Khartoum, since April, following a four-month revolt that toppled former 30-year dictator, Omar al-Bashir.

 

Wikipedia

  On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss the rapidly unfolding situation in Sudan. After months of protests, Sudan’s military stepped in and removed President Omar al-Bashir. Activists call the military takeover a coup that aims to reproduce the same faces that protesters revolted against. What’s next for Sudan?

  

On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss the violent crackdown on anti-government protesters and journalists in Sudan. According to human rights organizations, more than 40 people have been killed and at least 1,000 have been arrested, including scores of journalists.

Alawia Bakhit

From our new series Bay Views, a segment where we ask someone to go deep and think about an aspect of their Bay Area life that touches on a larger issue. Today, we’ll take a look from here at turmoil happening in Sudan, host Hana Baba's home country.

This Stanford grad student was one of the first Trump travel-ban detainees

Aug 28, 2017
"JFK Protest" by CC Flickr User Gabriel F, resized and recropped

Nisrin Elamin Abdelrahman is a Stanford doctoral student in anthropology. A citizen of Sudan, she was flying back to the United States from her academic field work when President Trump issued the first iteration of his travel ban.

Hana Baba

This is a field trip.

East Bay school kids going to the California Academy of  Sciences - pretty typical, right? Wrong.

This is the weekend school of the Sudanese Association of Northern California, or SANC, where Sudanese kids come every Sunday to learn their parents’ mother tongue and immerse themselves in Sudanese poetry, folklore, music, and spirituality.  Even this bus ride from San Leandro to San Francisco is a cultural lesson in disguise.

On the August 25th edition of  Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with award winning documentarian Hubert Sauper about his latest film, We Come As Friends.  Sauper traveled to Sudan to document the birth of South Sudan, which declared its independence in 2011. The film takes an in-depth look at the affects of colonialism, globalization, and corruption, and why South Sudan has been mired in a perpetual state of war. Join the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guest:

Hubert Sauper, documentary filmmaker, director, writer, producer, and actor

On the April 27th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Hajooj Kuka about his award winning documentary Beats of the Antonov. It tells the story of refugee communities Sudan and how music and dance has been vital to keep their cultural heritage alive. The film is playing at the San Francisco International Film Festival. How does music unify people? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Hana Baba and you.

Guests:

Hajooj Kuka, former war reporter and the director of Beats of the Antonov

Hana Baba

In Sudan, where my family is from, there is an ancient beauty ritual that married women perform called dukhan. It’s like a sauna, but with smoke. 

  

Ladin Awad

 

Sudanese Americans and expats in the Bay Area are spending their days and nights online these days – getting little sleep, calling home multiple times a day, checking on the safety of their family and friends, hoping for good news.

Including myself.

And the news is disturbing.