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San Francisco

Public art expected to change San Francisco skyline

May 22, 2018
Projected Completion, January 2018
Courtesy of the artist and Boston Properties

 

As the tallest building in San Francisco, Salesforce Tower is the new center of the city skyline. And starting today, the top of the tower will also become a work of public art, created by San Francisco artist Jim Campbell.

 

Jeremy Dalmas

 

April 15th just passed and you hopefully finished paying the IRS. But, if you’re an independent contractor in San Francisco your taxes to the city are due next on May 31st.

Ben Trefny

Today is the last day Californians can register to vote for the next election. Election Day is Tuesday, June 5th. And in San Francisco, as you probably know, we’re electing a new mayor.

Courtesy of CAAMFEST

 

Filipino filmmaker HP Mendoza’s first movie, Colma: The Musical, is an indie hit turned cult favorite. Mendoza's newest movie just premiered this month at the Center for Asian American Media’s film festival, or CAAMFEST. The film is called "Bitter Melon." It’s a tragicomedy set in San Francisco’s mission district that follows a Filipino-American family plotting a murder.

Shizue Seigel

Gentrification may be changing the racial demographics of San Francisco. But census data show people of color makeup over half of the city’s population.

Handout / Center for Youth Wellness

When we experience trauma as children — whether it’s the stress of an abusive parent, divorce, substance abuse, or the effects of poverty — do these traumatic events affect our lives even when we grow up?

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW News

 

A leaked document from the Department of Homeland Security proposes to make it more difficult for immigrants who use public services to remain in the United States.

Every Wednesday through Election Day on June 5th, Rose Aguilar will host a special second hour of Your Call at 11am focusing on San Francisco's crucial mayoral race, local propositions, and regional measures.

Cari Spivak

 

On Saturdays, Mariko Grady’s company, Aedan Fermented Foods, has a food stall at the San Francisco Ferry Plaza Farmers Market.

Asal Ehsanipour / KALW News

 

Last Wednesday, Grace Cathedral hosted an event that got national attention: a Beyoncé Mass.

Joshua Wirtschafter

In late March, little electric scooters started popping up all over San Francisco. So far the scooter companies have been operating without any kind of permit, but that could change soon.

Joan Marcus

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the performing arts in the Bay Area, host David Latulipe talks with Pulitzer Prize winning playwright and MacArthur Genius Grant recipient, Suzan-Lori Parks, about the A.C.T. production of her explosively powerful and lyrical new play Father Comes Home from the Wars (Parts 1, 2 & 3).

“Right now we’re standing in front of a more arid desert feature,” says my tour guide Darryl Smith. It’s an odd thing to point out in the middle of San Francisco — and the street sounds nearby don’t let you forget that you’re in the heart of the Tenderloin, but as soon as you set foot in this park, you know you’ve walked into a unique space.

Courtesy of Sweet Lew and The Sweet and Lows

 


Behind the scenes at the San Francisco Food Bank

Apr 24, 2018
San Francisco and Marin Food Bank

Paul Ash is the executive director of the San Francisco and Marin Food Banks. And he’s taking us on a tour of the main distribution center in Potrero Hill.

Jeremy Dalmas

This story originally aired in May of 2017.

San Francisco has the strongest economy of any city in the United States. And with business booming, a lot of eyes are on local corporations to see if they are giving back to the local community by paying their fair share in taxes.

Lydia Daniller

 


Rob Best

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the performing arts in the Bay Area, host David Latulippe talks with Tanya Chianese, director of the contemporary dance company ka·nei·see | collective about the world premiere of Nevertheless, a performance that explores the field of gender-based harassment from the subtle to the violent, in a marriage of song and dance, comedy and horror.

StoryCorps: Two moms, double the love

Apr 17, 2018
StoryCorps

Lamar Van Dyke, Paula Lewis and Traci Lewis have a special bond. Lamar gave birth to Traci when she was 18 years old. Unprepared to have a baby, she gave Traci up for adoption. Paula Lewis adopted her. Traci sat down with her biological mom, Lamar, and her adopted mom, Paula, at the StoryCorps booth at the San Francisco Public Library to talk about their family.

Click the audio player above to hear the story.

This interview was facilitated by Geraldine Ah-Sue, and produced for KALW by Chris Hambrick. It originally aired in May of 2015. 

Robert Huffstutter / Flikr / Creative Commons

 

The redevelopment of the Hunters Point Shipyard is slated to be San Francisco’s biggest redevelopment project since the 1906 earthquake.

 

The Shipyard is a former naval base and nuclear-weapons testing lab — and the cleanup of radioactive materials used there has been ongoing for decades.

 

Courtesy of Brava Center For The Arts

 

Artist Beatrice Thomas performs in drag as soulful death-metal diva Black Benatar at Drag Queen Story Time at the San Francisco Public Library — and all over the Bay.

 

She’ll be hosting Black Benatar’s Black Magic Cabaret as part of So Soul San Francisco at Brava Theater this week.

 

Reimagining life and death in San Francisco

Apr 12, 2018
Courtesy of ReImagine

 

On this edition of  Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll have a conversation with UC Berkeley geophysicist Roland Bürgmann about his recent report, which explores the impacts of sea level rise on the San Francisco Bay area.

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with choreographer Christy Funsch, about the premiere of Mother, Sister, Daughter, Marvel, a full-length work which celebrates the women of two distinct eras of San Francisco dance history. Featuring a cast of women/dance-makers over 40, Mother, Sister, Daughter, Marvel is inspired by the California Dancing Girls, one of the first all-women dance companies based in San Francisco in the 1910s.

Jeff Foster

There’s Wifi and Tesla, Cheerios and Cocoa Puff. There are three registered Clintons, and thirteen Bernies. Those are just some of the names of registered dogs residing in San Francisco, where the city's 120,000 canines famously outnumber its children.


On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the student led March for Our Lives rallies around the globe. How is this youth movement changing media coverage of gun control and the NRA?

Amber Miles

 

It’s Friday night on the corner of 16th and Valencia in San Francisco’s Mission District. Shops are closing up and folks that live out here are settling into vacant doorways. The traffic on the street sounds frustrated; revving, waiting, and beeping as the last of the commuters surface from the BART station and breeze by.

 

Most of them don’t even notice a man in a poofy red and white mushroom hat, sorting through a tangled web of colored wires and extension cords.

Wikimedia user Dllu, used under CC-BY)z

Eight years ago, there was no such thing as Uber or Lyft. Taxis were around, but they only made around one percent of all vehicle trips in San Francisco. Fast forward to now, and ride hailing companies make up around 15 percent of all trips that start and end within the city — an estimated 170,000 rides per day.

Student voices on school safety: Nicole O.

Mar 15, 2018

Student voices on school safety: Ana S.

Mar 15, 2018

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