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San Francisco

A revolutionary poet fans the Bay's literary fires

Jul 30, 2018

From prison activism to revolutionary poetry, author and educator Tongo Eisen-Marten's work has taken him from San Francisco to South Africa, with a stop at Riker's Island and Columbia University along the way.

Hana Baba / KALW News

 

Earlier this month, the East African countries of Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace deal, after decades of severed relations. The two nations fought a war in the 1990s after which all connection was cut off. No diplomatic ties, no trade, no transport — not even phone lines — despite a shared heritage and decades of intermarriage and close cultural ties.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

Bethany Snyder and Kristian Maul want their six-year-old daughter to know the importance of family because theirs is a little different: Kristian is trans. They sat down at the StoryCorps booth in San Francisco to tell their story.

The corpse flower blooms again

Jul 25, 2018
Zoe Ferrigno


San Francisco’s Conservatory of Flowers is usually closed on Mondays, but on July 23rd, the conservatory opened its doors to a stream of visitors, eager to see — and smell — a rare botanical phenomenon: the blooming of an amorphophallus titanum, or corpse flower.

Honoring Jerry Garcia's little-known past with Jerry Day

Jul 24, 2018
Used by permission from CC Flickr account humboldthead

 

From our Audiograph archives:

You might expect that a Jerry Garcia-themed event in San Francisco would be founded by a Deadhead. You know, a stereotypical Grateful Dead mega-fan who followed the band around the country for years, dropping acid, wearing tie-dye, and talking about world peace.

kgroovy / Flikr Creative Commons

 

The Shipyard is supposed to be San Francisco’s biggest redevelopment project since the 1906 earthquake. It’s slated to have affordable housing, office and retail space, and parks. But this year, the shipyard development has been infamously dubbed “The biggest case of eco fraud in US history.”

Bay Area Beats: DJ QBERT

Jul 19, 2018
Bo Walsh

 

Richard Quitevis is better known as DJ QBERT. He's been a pioneer in the art of DJ turntablism for close to 30 years.

quinn norton from Excellent Question, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

When the travel ban was first announced, many people were outraged — nationally and here in the Bay Area. At SFO, people brought signs and stood in the arrivals hall chanting to make their point against the ban. Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the ban, it’s become harder for activists, human rights lawyers, and community organizers to help those affected by it.

Courtesy of Josiah Luís Alderete

Josiah Luís Alderete will tell you he is “a full-blooded Pocho Indio who refries his beans and poesia in Spanglish.”

Ninna Gaensler-Debs / KALW News

 

In the past few weeks, the Bay Area has had one protest after another over the country’s immigration policies. There were thousands of people who took to the streets to march in protest of family separation.

Order 9066: Objects of Incarceration

Jul 17, 2018
Courtesy of American Public Media

This is an excerpt from “Order 9066,” a podcast from American Public Media and the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

What’s happening today to immigrants seeking asylum or refuge in the United States has many thinking about another time, a time when another population was incarcerated in this country in the name of national security. The time was World War Two, and the people were Japanese Americans.

Public Domain

As thousands of migrant children wait to be reunited with their parents, images of them in detention centers continue to rock the country. Poet and activist Tongo Eisen-Martin traveled to McAllen, Texas to see what was happening for himself.

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

The new Transbay Transit Center opens next month in San Francisco. It’s meant to connect buses from the East Bay with MUNI, Caltrain, and High-Speed Rail. The only problem? The tunnel connecting Caltrain to the transit center hasn’t been built yet. The tunnel will be less than miles long, but building it will cost $4 billion dollars, on top of the $2.2 billion already spent on the transit center.

Hey Area: What is the Emergency Alert System testing?

Jul 17, 2018
Christine Nguyen / KALW News

You ask, we answer.

One listener wanted to know, “What is this ‘test of the emergency system we hear now and then on the air?” Reporter Christine Nguyen has the answer.

Tobias Kleinlercher / Wikipedia, used under CC BY-SA 3.0 / cropped

San Francisco’s Bush and Pine Streets efficiently get drivers from Point A to B. Or as some like to say, “From Bush to the Bay, Pine to the Pacific.” KALW listener Steve Greenberg wanted to know when these two streets became one-way. But more importantly, why?

Flikr user Rusty Blazenhoff used underUNDER CC BY-NC 2.0 / CROPPED AND RESIZED

When recreational cannabis was legalized in California just over six months ago, the people championing legal weed had high hopes. Growers could emerge out of the shadows into the light. People arrested during the War on Drugs could become CEOs of cannabis empires. Millions of dollars worth of tax revenue would ooze out of marijuana plants right into the government’s pockets. But cannabis trade groups also warned regulations would push some people out.

Chan Rodgers

KALW listener, Chan Rodgers was curious about one of San Francisco’s most distinctive buildings, and the provocative shadow it sometimes casts. So, he posed this question to our Hey Area project:

Churches help Bay Area Samoans keep traditions alive

Jun 25, 2018
Sara Harrison

 

There are the 50 states, of course, but there are 14 territories in the Caribbean and Pacific Islands that are also part of the United States. One of those is American Samoa.

Lee Romney

 

Walter Turner edges his 1989 Rolls Royce down a residential street in his Hunters Point neighborhood. It’s a white Silver Spur with a vinyl top the color of peanut butter and Turner’s just had it detailed earlier in the day.

 

Courtesy of Giorgio Angelini

 

The history of home ownership in the US is a complicated one, but a look at that history can help shed light on why today’s housing economy is the way it is —especially if you go back to post-World War II America.

Earl Buenaobra

 

Choreographer, musician, and healer Sammay Dizon is originally from the Southern California city of Carson, but she’s made her artistic home here in the Bay. Her work often deals with  her cultural identity as a Filipina woman, particularly in the multimedia arts festival she founded, Urban X Indigenous.

Ben Trefny

It’s the final game of the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department's Junior Warriors 8th grade girls basketball league. The SOMA Stars and the Lady Hurricanes take their positions on the court. A tall, wiry man – the referee – steps to the center. He looks at all the girls, smiles, and tosses the ball straight up in the air. Two girls jump for it, and the game is on.

Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, courtesy of the artists, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, and Luhring Augustine, New York

 

Maybe you were among the lucky visitors to a sonic installation at San Francisco’s Fort Mason Center a couple years ago.

The Spot: Waves & Trains

Jun 10, 2018
www.munidiaries.com

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers... 

David Wilson

 

Actress, writer, and educator Rhodessa Jones got the idea for The Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women almost 30 years ago, after teaching classes at the San Francisco County Jail.

Eli Wirtschafter

Last December, James Smith’s car was towed as a consequence of unpaid parking violations. Smith was homeless, and the car was his only shelter. Now, Smith filing suit against San Francisco, arguing that towing for debt-collection is unconstitutional.

Courtesy of London Breed

 

When Mayor Ed Lee unexpectedly passed away last December, London Breed became acting mayor — the first African American woman in that position.

Ben Trefny

 

Angela Alioto has been involved with politics in San Francisco for longer than she’s been a politician. That’s because her father, Joseph Alioto, was the city’s mayor 50 years ago.

Ben Trefny

Supervisor Jane Kim is one of eight candidates in the race for mayor of San Francisco. She’s the first Korean-American elected official in the city.

 

Since 2010 she’s represented District 6, which includes Civic Center, Downtown, and Mission Bay.

 

She sat down for a conversation with us, and explained why she believes she should be the city’s next mayor.

 

Liza Veale / KALW News

Last year, more than 1,600 San Francisco renters received eviction notices. Some of them fought back in court, but many — even those who had a good case — gave up and moved out because they didn’t know their legal rights.

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