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rehabilitation

Philosophy Talk: Philosophy Behind Bars

Aug 20, 2019

What is it like to teach philosophy in prison. What is it like to study philosophy while serving time?


On this edition of Your Call, Alison Fogg Carlson joins us to discuss Walking in Grace: Miracles in a City of Angels, a collection of stories to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Homeboy Industries, an organization that provides education, therapy, job training, and tattoo removal services to former gang members in Los Angeles. Homeboy Industries provides a second chance at life to those who never had a first. What can we learn from former gang members who’ve gone through radical changes?

On this edition of Your Call, we welcome back Rachel Louise Snyder, author of No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us. We’ll discuss anti-violence programs for men, including one called Resolve to Stop the Violence, which began in a San Bruno jail. 

  

Joseph Pace sits down with the co-founders of Oakland-based Re:Store Justice, Alex Mallick and Adnan Khan, who was recently released from San Quentin after 16 years.

Steve Drown and JulianGlenn Padgett

From the series Uncuffed:

Damon Cooke says that anger used to make him feel powerful. It would also get him into trouble. After getting locked up, Damon started to think about his relationship with rage as a kind of love affair — one that he had the power to end.

Homeboy Industries

  

Father Gregory Boyle was a pastor at a church in Los Angeles in the late 1980s, a time of devastating gang violence. Boyle responded to the violence in the community by working with gang members and formerly incarcerated people. He started an organization that eventually came to be known as Homeboy Industries, now the largest gang rehabilitation project in the world. In his new book, Barking to the Choir: The power of radical kinship, Boyle explores the spiritual lessons learned from the stories of the former gang members he has worked with.

FAMILY WATCH DOG

A federal judge declared Colorado’s sex-offender registry unconstitutional earlier this month, ruling that making sex-offenders' addresses, ages and photos accessible to the public is cruel and unusual punishment. Now, an effort to reform California’s own sex-offender registry is raising questions and concerns.

 

  

We’re continuing our discussion with 2017 Peacemaker Award Recipients. Phoebe Vanderhorst, founder of Way-Pass: Women's Aftercare Program and Supportive Services, joins us to discuss the unique barriers formerly incarcerated women face.

San Quentin Prison Report: Guiding rage into power

Oct 24, 2016
Under CC license from Flickr user AH ZUT

Guiding rage into power, or G.R.I.P., is a 52-week program for violent offenders at San Quentin. It teaches the men how to understand the impact they had on their victims, how to stop their violent behavior, cultivate mindfulness and develop emotional intelligence.

Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com

Monday, January 4th at 5pm, tune in to hear “Stories from San Quentin,” a special broadcast from Life of the Law featuring powerful human stories of prisoners, staff and volunteers at California's oldest prison.

Ben Oberg / Flickr

  

On the August 20th edition of Your Call, we continue our week-long series on the US prison system by discussing rehabilitation. 

Public Safety -- Juveniles who Commit Serious Crimes: Rehabilitation v. Adult Prison Sentences.
Guests: Steve Wagstaffe, District Attorney of San Mateo County; Chris Arriola, Supervising Deputy District Attorney of Juvenile Unit, Santa Clara County; Jeff Hayden, Defense  Attorney/Certified Specialist in Criminal Law; Frankie Guzman, Attorney with National Center for Youth Law; and Judge Eugene Hyman, Santa Clara County (Ret.).
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests, please call 415-841-4134.

Under CC license from Flickr user MaestroBen

 

Dionne Wilson's husband, a San Leandro police officer, was killed in the line of duty seven years ago, but she says it took her a long time to find a way to really heal.

“For many years, I carried around so much vengeance and hate. I realized at a certain point I had nothing left. I had no more tools. I engaged in a lot of self-destructive behavior. I tried to buy my way out of my grief; I tried to drink my way out for a short period. Thankfully, I didn’t take that too far. And I just didn’t have a way to move past being embroiled in the moment,” says Wilson.

Wilson initially thought the trial and conviction of her husband’s murderer would bring her some sort of comfort or closure.

Youth Radio: Staying off probation, and teaching others how

Aug 22, 2013

In 2008, Reinaldi Gilder promised himself that he would never go back to jail. Since his release in December of that year, he’s not only managed to keep his word, he has also shown others that they can do the same.

Credit Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

August 27, 2012