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rehabilitation

"San Quentin State Prison" by Zboralski. Used under CC BY-SA 3.0. http://bit.ly/2fxIh2g

 

Last month, over a hundred people were transferred from a San Bernardino County prison — a known COVID-19 hotspot — to San Quentin State Prison. Now, over two weeks later, there’s at least 30 confirmed cases of the virus at San Quentin, only about half of which were transfers.

Philosophy Talk: Philosophy Behind Bars

Aug 20, 2019

What is it like to teach philosophy in prison. What is it like to study philosophy while serving time?


On this edition of Your Call, Alison Fogg Carlson joins us to discuss Walking in Grace: Miracles in a City of Angels, a collection of stories to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Homeboy Industries, an organization that provides education, therapy, job training, and tattoo removal services to former gang members in Los Angeles.

  Homeboy Industries provides a second chance at life to those who never had a first. What can we learn from former gang members who’ve gone through radical changes?

On this edition of Your Call, we welcome back Rachel Louise Snyder, author of No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us. We’ll discuss anti-violence programs for men, including one called Resolve to Stop the Violence, which began in a San Bruno jail. 

 


On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the campaign against Representative Ilhan Omar for criticizing the political influence of the pro-Israel lobby AIPAC and House Democrats’ debate over anti-Semitism and Islamophobia.

  

Joseph Pace sits down with the co-founders of Oakland-based Re:Store Justice, Alex Mallick and Adnan Khan, who was recently released from San Quentin after 16 years.

Steve Drown and JulianGlenn Padgett

From the series Uncuffed:

Damon Cooke says that anger used to make him feel powerful. It would also get him into trouble. After getting locked up, Damon started to think about his relationship with rage as a kind of love affair — one that he had the power to end.

Photo courtesy of Nigel Akkara/modified from original

This Mother’s Day Sandip remembers Nigel Akkara, who told him about his two mothers.

Homeboy Industries

  

Father Gregory Boyle was a pastor at a church in Los Angeles in the late 1980s, a time of devastating gang violence. Boyle responded to the violence in the community by working with gang members and formerly incarcerated people. He started an organization that eventually came to be known as Homeboy Industries, now the largest gang rehabilitation project in the world. In his new book, Barking to the Choir: The power of radical kinship, Boyle explores the spiritual lessons learned from the stories of the former gang members he has worked with.

FAMILY WATCH DOG

A federal judge declared Colorado’s sex-offender registry unconstitutional earlier this month, ruling that making sex-offenders' addresses, ages and photos accessible to the public is cruel and unusual punishment. Now, an effort to reform California’s own sex-offender registry is raising questions and concerns.

 

  

We’re continuing our discussion with 2017 Peacemaker Award Recipients. Phoebe Vanderhorst, founder of Way-Pass: Women's Aftercare Program and Supportive Services, joins us to discuss the unique barriers formerly incarcerated women face.

San Quentin Prison Report: Guiding rage into power

Oct 24, 2016
Under CC license from Flickr user AH ZUT

Guiding rage into power, or G.R.I.P., is a 52-week program for violent offenders at San Quentin. It teaches the men how to understand the impact they had on their victims, how to stop their violent behavior, cultivate mindfulness and develop emotional intelligence.

A Debate of California Proposition 57 -- The Public Safety & Rehabilitation Act of 2016. Guests: Stephen Wagstaffe, President of the California District Attorneys Assn; Jeffrey Hayden, Chair of the California Board of Legal Specialization and Specialist in Criminal Law; California Superior Court Judge Eugene Hyman (Ret). Listeners with questions for Chuck & his guests, please call toll-free 1-866-798-8255.

Elisabeth Fall/fallfoto.com

Monday, January 4th at 5pm, tune in to hear “Stories from San Quentin,” a special broadcast from Life of the Law featuring powerful human stories of prisoners, staff and volunteers at California's oldest prison.

Ben Oberg / Flickr

  

On the August 20th edition of Your Call, we continue our week-long series on the US prison system by discussing rehabilitation. 

Public Safety -- Juveniles who Commit Serious Crimes: Rehabilitation v. Adult Prison Sentences.
Guests: Steve Wagstaffe, District Attorney of San Mateo County; Chris Arriola, Supervising Deputy District Attorney of Juvenile Unit, Santa Clara County; Jeff Hayden, Defense  Attorney/Certified Specialist in Criminal Law; Frankie Guzman, Attorney with National Center for Youth Law; and Judge Eugene Hyman, Santa Clara County (Ret.).
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests, please call 415-841-4134.

California has one of the highest prison populations in the country. Of the two million people serving time in prisons in the U.S, more than 130,000 of them are incarcerated in our state - a system designed to house 80,000. In response to that overcrowding, the federal government has ordered the state to cut the prison population by about a quarter.

Photo by Jeremy Dalmas

It can be hard to donate your old things to a thrift store, but the idea is that your stuff will get a second life. Once it is donated, it will make its way to new owners. But what does it take to get those things ready to be used again?

At 26th and Valencia in San Francisco is a nondescript three-story warehouse that used to be an old shoe factory. Now it is where the endless Salvation Army donations are sorted, and it is like a little city inside.

The Unloading Dock

Kyung Jin Lee / KALW

On a breezy summer day at San Quentin State Prison, inmate Paul Stauffer reads his writing to a live audience.

“My shoulders brush the sides of the wall and bunk as I pace the nine feet of my cell, between the sink and door. A scream echoed silently from my tortured soul, as hopeless dreams of a once meaningful life, floated endlessly across my mind…” he reads.

Creative self expression is a proven force for change in prisons. Inmates in this creative writing class, and classes like it, are less likely to commit crimes when they’re released.

Under CC license from Flickr user MaestroBen

 

Dionne Wilson's husband, a San Leandro police officer, was killed in the line of duty seven years ago, but she says it took her a long time to find a way to really heal.

“For many years, I carried around so much vengeance and hate. I realized at a certain point I had nothing left. I had no more tools. I engaged in a lot of self-destructive behavior. I tried to buy my way out of my grief; I tried to drink my way out for a short period. Thankfully, I didn’t take that too far. And I just didn’t have a way to move past being embroiled in the moment,” says Wilson.

Wilson initially thought the trial and conviction of her husband’s murderer would bring her some sort of comfort or closure.

Youth Radio: Staying off probation, and teaching others how

Aug 22, 2013

In 2008, Reinaldi Gilder promised himself that he would never go back to jail. Since his release in December of that year, he’s not only managed to keep his word, he has also shown others that they can do the same.

KALW's Nancy Mullane spent the last year touring the most secure prisons in California, including death row at San Quentin, the Protective Housing Unit at Corcoran, and Pelican Bay State Prison. 

She sat down with California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) deputy secretary Terry Thornton to discuss why these stories aren’t told more often.

Prison rehab programs on the rise

Nov 12, 2012
Kyung-Jin Lee

In California, last week’s vote was in many ways a referendum on our criminal justice system. Voters rejected Proposition 34, and so the state’s death penalty will remain in place. But Californians also amended the so-called three strikes law, so that nonviolent offenders are less likely to spend their whole lives in prison. That second vote suggests that voters may be starting to think more about rehabilitation than punishment.  

Credit Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

August 27, 2012

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison. 

Schadenfreude: To take delight or pleasure in another's discomfort or pain.

With imminent budget cuts, pay decreases, and layoffs looming for the California Department of Corrections, there has been a noticeable increase in harassment and vexatious behavior by some prison guards towards prisoners under their authority.

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison. 

May 2, 2012

The Argument in Favor of Re-implementation and Expansion of a Correctional Re-entry Program

Cal Fire

It’s summer in California, which means fire season is in full force – and it could be the worst one in years. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, better known as CAL FIRE, responds to more than 5,000 wildfires each year. They protect more than 31 million acres of California’s privately-owned wildlands and provide emergency services for most of the state’s counties.

Thirty years ago, the state spent three percent of its general fund dollars on corrections and prisons. Today it spends more than 11 percent – that’s $10 billion running the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. 

In 2011, when Governor Brown took office, he inherited a massive corrections problem. The state's 33 prisons were at nearly 200 percent capacity, and the recidivism rate was running at 70 percent. The federal courts stepped in and ordered California to reduce its overcrowded prisons by more than 30,000 people.

Dan4th Nicholas

As with much conventional wisdom on crime and punishment, popular notions of what actually causes recidivism--people cycling repeatedly in and out of prison--don't hold up when you look at the statistics. California's latest report analyzing its notoriously high (currently 65 percent) recidivism rate contains an array of numerical nuggets that shed new light on the cycle of crime. A sampling:

Joe Mud

Yesterday, officials from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation travelled to Chowchilla in the Central Valley to talk to locals about the pending conversion of Valley State Prison for Women into a men’s facility. Chowchilla, the closest town to two of the state’s three women’s prisons, has resisted the conversion, worried about the impact of bringing in thousands of male prisoners.

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