Race & Identity | KALW

Race & Identity

Sexism In High School Debate

Feb 10, 2020

When it comes to running for office, there are certain standards women have to deal with that men don’t. Hannah Ni, a senior at Presentation High School in San Jose, says young, female debaters like her face similar instances of sexism and misogyny. 

Courtesy of Lisa D. Gray

Lisa D. Gray could barely read when she became fascinated with books. Now she’s penning award-winning stories about race and class. Lisa is the founder of Our Voices Our Stories SF, a literary event where women writers of color and the community engage.

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

San Francisco Unified’s graduation rate for African American students jumps to nearly 90 percent — well above the state average.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

In 2019, the UN’s Refugee Agency reported that an unprecedented number of people had been forced to flee their home countries. Over 70 million people are currently displaced worldwide, and the global refugee population is expected to increase in 2020.

Denisha DeLane / Faithinthebay.com

At Allen Temple Baptist Church in Oakland, it’s not the future that’s female, it’s the present. Reverend Dr. Jacqueline Thompson is the first female senior pastor in the church’s 100-year history. She talks about her vision for leadership and gender issues in the black church.

The Lavin Agency

Sometimes it may feel like our society lacks empathy for other points of view, especially in politics, but also when we talk about race, gender, or even sports — we can discount the feelings and experiences of people who are different. 

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

It’s been 40 years since a landmark legal ruling led to a statewide ban on the IQ testing of black students for purposes of placement in special ed. Now, the lead plaintiff in that case, known as “Larry P,” is getting a second chance at an education.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

This week, families across the country will sit down for a Thanksgiving dinner made up of, well, a lot of the same dishes. But, the exact recipes can be very different and varied. San Francisco chef Traci Des Jardins draws inspiration from her multicultural childhood in the Central Valley for a feast that will make your mouth water.

San Quentin News

 

From the project Uncuffed and San Quentin Radio:

There are about a hundred people in San Quentin state prison who identify as Native American. One of those people is Eldridge Leigh Yazzie. He's Navajo and has been incarcerated for 27 years. Native Americans like Yazzie have the right to practice their spirituality in prison. But sometimes the rules of prison conflict with their spiritual practices. 

David Allen

Magician Namigoro Sumidagawa brought Japanese magic shows to America in 1866, making the artform popular. Then western magicians appropriated his act. Actor David Hirata tells this story through monologue and magic in "A Box Without a Bottom: Soko-Nashi Bako."

Josh Egel

The Onyx is a diverse collective of six black female artists, based in Oakland, who have audiences grooving to a range of sounds from R&B and rock to Latin music. In this interview, singer Dane’elle Emerson and drummer Genesis Valentine talk about empowering black women through music.

The Onyx self-titled EP is available now. See them perform this Saturday, Oct. 12 at the Life is Living Festival in West Oakland’s Bobby Hutton Park. 

Click the play button above to listen to the interview.

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders / Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Readers worldwide are still grieving the loss of Toni Morrison. We reflect on the late author’s legacy and speak to some of her fans at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. 

Jenee Darden

July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. The month was inspired by the late writer Bebe Moore Campbell. KALW reporter Jenee Darden shares her poetry and journey with depression in this Bay View. Jenee is the author of "When a Purple Rose Blooms."

An East Oakland Community Comes Together To Address Mental Health

Jul 31, 2019
Cinque Mubarak

East Oakland residents have lived with violence for a long time. Studies show exposure can impact mental health. A listener asked our Hey Area project what kind of volunteer work are East Oakland residents involved with. 

One organization is helping black women with their mental health

Courtesy of Sabreena Haque

As a young girl, henna artist Sabreena Haque learned about her culture’s ancient traditions during family visits to Pakistan. She became fascinated with the intricacy of henna designs at a family wedding and saw the art form as a way to share her culture with others.

The Stoop: The Nod

Jul 23, 2019

From The Stoop

It's that silent acknowledgment. That "I see you," moment. But not everyone is a nodder. We send producers on the streets to see if the nod is still going strong and hear from one hesitant nodder who breaks down why it's not always been her thing.

Eric Risberg / AP Images

The Oakland City Council voted to ban the use of facial recognition technology last week. The software is used by police around the country to find wanted suspects and find missing children. But civil liberties advocates say the technology can lead to wrongful arrests and convictions.

The Stoop: Black Enough

Jul 22, 2019
Neema Iyer / The Stoop

From The Stoop:

Whether it's the music we hear, the clothes we wear, or the way we talk, a lot of us at some point were made to feel 'not black enough.' In this episode, we go deep with comedian W. Kamau Bell who's felt awkward in black circles and before black audiences, and we'll meet Black Benatar, a drag queen who struggles with performing blackness.

Jenee Darden / KALW

In this edition of Bay Area Beats Brittany Tanner, Felicia Gangloff-Bailey, Lauren Adams, and, Karega Bailey of SOL (Source of Light) Development explain using their music as a form of activism and healing.

Peter Prato

For actor and playwright Dan Hoyle, theatre is part of his DNA. His father is veteran stage performer Geoff Hoyle, and Dan has had several acclaimed one-man shows that not only make audiences laugh but think. He’s back at the Marsh for his latest production "Border People."

'Tales of the City' for a new San Francisco

Jun 5, 2019
Alison Cohen Rosa / Netflix

 


Armistead Maupin’s 'Tales of the City' began as a serial fiction column in the San Francisco Chronicle. So far it has spawned nine novels and three TV miniseries. And this weekend, Netflix is launching a new 'Tales of the City' miniseries

Muralist Juana Alicia on making art inspired by poetry

May 22, 2019
Courtesy of Juana Alicia

Muralist and activist Juana Alicia grew up in Detroit inspired by the work of Mexican artist Diego Rivera. In the 1970s, Juana was making posters for the United Farm Workers’ grape boycotts, when she was recruited by civil rights activist Cesar Chavez.

Courtesy of Soleil Ho

The San Francisco Chronicle’s restaurant critic Soleil Ho is a self described ‘ethno food warrior’ who writes on what she calls ‘the fish sauce beat.’ She’s Asian American, queer, and writes about the intersections of culture and food. 

Courtesy of Karen Gutfreund

Fahrenheit 213 is a group art exhibit made by feminist artists and writers, dozens of them from around the Bay. It spotlights works inspired by feminist protest. The exhibit is co-curated by artist-activist Karen Gutfreund. 

Fahrenheit 213 is showing at the Arc Gallery in San Francisco through May 11.

Courtesy of Nikki Jones

University of California, Berkeley sociologist Nikki Jones is a criminal justice researcher and her latest book is about violence in black neighborhoods and black men with criminal histories who are trying to change their lives. She spent years in the lower Fillmore getting to know the community and what it is like to live in their rapidly changing neighborhood.

BOB WHITE / CRW PHOTOGRAPHY

Singer Rhonda Benin has toured professionally for over 25 years. She’s a member of the Grammy-nominated “Linda Tillery and the Cultural Heritage Choir,” and she’s a soloist.

Wilfred Galila

For over 40 years choreographer Alleluia Panis has been presenting her Dance theatre works on Bay Area stages. After immigrating to San Francisco from the Philippines in the mid-1960s, Alleluia became a fixture in the South of Market Filipino arts community.