Race & Identity | KALW

Race & Identity

Few can argue that the country isn't heavily divided politically right now. Racial divides have deepened and it can feel like even having conversations with each other is a burden. President Joe Biden dedicated his inaugural speech to unifying the country, finding common ground, but how?

For many of us, success and 'making it' also means you're expected to help out and support your family. Whether you're Black American, or a child of Black immigrants, that 'Black Tax' is often something you're going to be thinking about. In this episode of The Stoop, we get personal with a story from Mwende Hinojosa who explains how WhatsApp brings her Kenyan family together but it can also be very ... taxing.

The pen, the mic, the camera are all powerful tools that people in media have used to get our attention, but, for Black women journalists, getting a hold of that power and keeping it, has been a tough path to navigate. In this episode of The Stoop, we explore the profession with journalist Jemele Hill, and hear about the past from veteran journalist Belva Davis.

Should we support Black no matter what? In this episode of The Stoop, we discuss the pressure to conform with liking all things Black, even when you don’t really feel that way, whether it’s Black art, the Black politician, or a hashtag.

Jewel Devora

Natalie Devora’s memoir "Black Girl, White Skin: A Life in Stories" is about challenges she faced growing up with albinism during the '60s and '70s in East Oakland. 

blackatalbany

Many young people of color are faced with racism everyday, whether it’s blatant and in your face, or subtler microaggressions. One example was in the news three years ago, when a group of students at Albany High School created a racist instagram account attacking fellow Black students with racial slurs and depicted them as gorillas and hanging from nooses. The incident shook the school and the city.

Babette Thomas / KALW


photo provided by Jenee Darden

Gov. Gavin Newsom recently signed a bill mandating that all Cal State University freshmen entering the 2020-2021 academic year must take an ethnic studies course. KALW’s Jenee Darden shares how majoring in ethnic studies shaped her life.

Geoff Livingston / Flickr Creative Commons

COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting Black and Latinx California residents. And it’s not just the coronavirus. Across the board, CDC data shows that Black Americans have lower life expectancies than white people in the U.S. — and research suggests that racism is one reason why.

UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism has new leadership. Geeta Anand is the new interim dean and the first woman to be in that position. Anand started in the midst of a major shakeup over diversity at the school, after the resignation of Ed Wasserman, who was dean for seven years. 

Porfirio Rangel / KALW

Hey Area is where you ask the questions and we find the answers. Today’s question comes from Monzerrath Gonzalez: “Who are the most influential Latinos in the Bay Area?”

Wikimedia Commons

The recent protests against the killing of Black people by police have put racial inequity at the forefront of our national conversation. Santa Clara County witnessed some of the first and largest protests in the Bay Area last month, in San Jose. And the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors has promised to address inequity in their county.

Photo courtesy of Rue Mapp

An incident involving a white woman calling the cops on a black birder in Central Park last month sparked a conversation about racism in the outdoors world. And, it sparked a celebration online: Black Birders Week. Black naturalists highlighted both the prejudices and the joys they experience out in nature. One of their messages? There are more of us than you think. 

Mike Kai Chen

In April, nearly 4,000 Mission District residents volunteered to get tested for COVID-19 and its antibodies. Unidos en Salud released the results of that testing on Monday, which raise difficult questions about racial and class disparities in San Francisco.

The Stoop

COVID-19 has hit black communities hard — in many places, harder than the general population. Here in California, as of April 17, black residents were dying at twice the rate of white residents. In New York City, black people are dying more than any other racial group. In this episode of The Stoop, we explore the reasons behind this higher mortality rate, we go back to dig into some history, and dispel some myths about black people and the coronavirus. 

Damion Hunter

The gooming industry is one of many that have been hit hard by coronavirus closures — nail shops, hair salons, and barbershops. The government doesn’t consider them essential services.

Lee Romney / KALW

 

John Templeton’s been leading land tours of SF’s black history for years. Now, he’s launched a Bay tour, to share those hidden stories from the water. He hopes to defy stereotypes and give black youth, in particular, a sense of pride and belonging.

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

Sexism In High School Debate

Feb 10, 2020

When it comes to running for office, there are certain standards women have to deal with that men don’t. Hannah Ni, a senior at Presentation High School in San Jose, says young, female debaters like her face similar instances of sexism and misogyny. 

Courtesy of Lisa D. Gray

Lisa D. Gray could barely read when she became fascinated with books. Now she’s penning award-winning stories about race and class. Lisa is the founder of Our Voices Our Stories SF, a literary event where women writers of color and the community engage.

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

San Francisco Unified’s graduation rate for African American students jumps to nearly 90 percent — well above the state average.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

In 2019, the UN’s Refugee Agency reported that an unprecedented number of people had been forced to flee their home countries. Over 70 million people are currently displaced worldwide, and the global refugee population is expected to increase in 2020.

Denisha DeLane / Faithinthebay.com

At Allen Temple Baptist Church in Oakland, it’s not the future that’s female, it’s the present. Reverend Dr. Jacqueline Thompson is the first female senior pastor in the church’s 100-year history. She talks about her vision for leadership and gender issues in the black church.

The Lavin Agency

Sometimes it may feel like our society lacks empathy for other points of view, especially in politics, but also when we talk about race, gender, or even sports — we can discount the feelings and experiences of people who are different. 

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

It’s been 40 years since a landmark legal ruling led to a statewide ban on the IQ testing of black students for purposes of placement in special ed. Now, the lead plaintiff in that case, known as “Larry P,” is getting a second chance at an education.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW

This week, families across the country will sit down for a Thanksgiving dinner made up of, well, a lot of the same dishes. But, the exact recipes can be very different and varied. San Francisco chef Traci Des Jardins draws inspiration from her multicultural childhood in the Central Valley for a feast that will make your mouth water.

San Quentin News

 

From the project Uncuffed and San Quentin Radio:

There are about a hundred people in San Quentin state prison who identify as Native American. One of those people is Eldridge Leigh Yazzie. He's Navajo and has been incarcerated for 27 years. Native Americans like Yazzie have the right to practice their spirituality in prison. But sometimes the rules of prison conflict with their spiritual practices. 

David Allen

Magician Namigoro Sumidagawa brought Japanese magic shows to America in 1866, making the artform popular. Then western magicians appropriated his act. Actor David Hirata tells this story through monologue and magic in "A Box Without a Bottom: Soko-Nashi Bako."

Josh Egel

The Onyx is a diverse collective of six black female artists, based in Oakland, who have audiences grooving to a range of sounds from R&B and rock to Latin music. In this interview, singer Dane’elle Emerson and drummer Genesis Valentine talk about empowering black women through music.

The Onyx self-titled EP is available now. See them perform this Saturday, Oct. 12 at the Life is Living Festival in West Oakland’s Bobby Hutton Park. 

Click the play button above to listen to the interview.

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders / Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Readers worldwide are still grieving the loss of Toni Morrison. We reflect on the late author’s legacy and speak to some of her fans at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. 

Jenee Darden

July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. The month was inspired by the late writer Bebe Moore Campbell. KALW reporter Jenee Darden shares her poetry and journey with depression in this Bay View. Jenee is the author of "When a Purple Rose Blooms."

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