police | KALW

police

Katie Gilmartin

Blackmail, My Love is a noir murder-mystery novel set in San Francisco, 1951 - "The Dark Ages of Queerdom," as author and illustrator Katie Gilmartin puts it - when cops raided gay and lesbian bars, beat up patrons and demanded "protection" money, and when lesbians and gay men were so afraid of public exposure they were easy blackmail targets.  The book is illustrated with 21 of Gilmartin's original prints, including "Miss Double Strand" here.

10pm Tuesday on KALW, historian, printmaker, Queer Ancestors Project founder and novelist Katie Gilmartin reads from her book and talks about mid-last century San Francisco queer life.

By Flickr user Thomas Hawk / used under CC / resized and cropped

The City of Oakland is facing a huge budget deficit and a new report shows that a large part of that is caused by police overspending.

Loren Javier / Flickr/Creative Commons

Currently, contract negotiations between the city and the San Francisco Police Officers Association happen behind closed doors. But as calls for police reform grow louder locally and across the country, Supervisor Hillary Ronen wants this to change.

Roger Jones / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city is negotiating pay for police through June 2023. If passed, the agreement would defer pay raises for police officers for the next two years. City officials wanted to cut spending because of the COVID-19 economic downturn, and estimate it would save San Francisco $12 million this year.  

Thomas Hawk under CC By-NC 2.0

 


In July, U.S. District Court Judge Joseph Spero banned Oakland Police from using so-called “less-lethal” weapons, including rubber bullets, and severely limited the use of pepper-spray.

Courtesy of Rosie Chavez

When people are killed by law enforcement, family members don’t get the same resources family members killed by civilians get. That’s what Rosie Chavez learned after her nephew Jacob Dominguez was killed by law enforcement in 2017. So without help from the state, she found her own support network.

Mona Caron

A group of activists in San Francisco understood the importance of mass visibility four years ago when they went on a hunger strike after a series of fatal police killings. They were called the Frisco Five, and their goal was to force out the city's police chief.

"SFPD" by rulenumberone2 licensed under CC BY 2.0

 

Yesterday was the deadline for the California legislature to vote on many bills — some of which addressed police reform.

Jeff Turner, Flickr


California is on the road to changing policing. And recent reform bills in the works with the state legislature are paving the way, with an August 31st deadline approaching. 

Karl Schultz / Flickr Creative Commons

 

San Francisco could join Oakland and Berkeley when the city’s Supervisors vote on millions in proposed cuts to the San Francisco Police Department.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

The movement to defund police has forced Bay Area officials to take a hard look at their budgets in recent weeks. But radically transforming policing won’t happen overnight. In Oakland, reducing the police budget by 50% will take at least one task force. 

Pax Ahimsa Gethen / Creative Commons

 

Several changes are being made to create more transparency in police duties, according to Berkeleyside.

The new rules emphasize the preservation of life as the guiding principle. For the first time in its history, the Berkeley police department will be required to produce an annual use-of-force report that the public can review.

Thomas Hawk, Flickr


Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf’s house was vandalized by a group of individuals around 2 a.m. on Tuesday morning. 

Jinho’s Journey: Fighting Police Violence From the Inside

Jul 21, 2020
Courtesy of Jinho Ferriera

Black Lives Matter might be the largest social movement in American history. Last month, an estimated 15 to 26 million people took to the streets to protest police violence, launching a national conversation about the role systemic racism plays in law enforcement.

City of Vallejo Vimeo

A month after Vallejo police shot and killed Sean Monterrosa, the department has released the body camera video of the incident.

Daniel Arauz / Wikimedia Commons

 

The Oakland City Council recently approved the city’s mid-cycle budget, which goes into effect tomorrow. Though it fell short of calls to defund the Oakland Police Department, it did move roughly 3% of OPD’s budget, $14.3 million, to alternative safety measures. 

Flickr.com

The Oakland City Council voted on a new budget Tuesday with minimal cuts to the Oakland Police Department budget amidst protests for defunding the OPD. 

Reginald James / Public Domain

 


Leaders at BART have pledged to shift $2 million from sworn officers and fare inspectors to unarmed ambassadors. These staff would wear uniforms and patrol the trains unarmed.

On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we're speaking with FRONTLINE correspondent Martin Smith about The Virus: What Went Wrong, a new documentary that traces the Trump administration’s failure to prepare and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Russell Mondy / Flickr / Creative Commons

Oakland councilmembers are proposing serious changes to their police department budget.

Photo courtesy of The Daily Mail/photo modified from original

  In the news recently, statues have been defaced and pulled down from their perches ala Saddam Hussein.

"Defund the Police" by Taymaz Valley, used under CC license, resized and cropped

As protests against systemic racism and police brutality continue across the country, Bay Area cities are now considering measures to reform, defund or even dismantle their police forces.  

Civil Unrest or Redress Grievances

Jun 3, 2020

A series of protests embroil the entire country following another killing at the hands of a police officer.  Some are outraged by the loss of life, others by the destruction of property and civil unrest that followed.  

The Growing Calls To Defund Police & What That Would Look Like

Jun 3, 2020
John Minchillo / AP Photo

  On this edition of Your Call, we continue our series on the uprisings over the death of George Floyd and police brutality. According to Mapping Police Violence, from 2013 to 2019, 99 percent of killings by police did not result in officers being charged with a crime.

*Hajee / Flickr / Creative Commons

A Northern California district attorney has declined to file charges against a police officer who fatally shot a 15-year-old boy in 2018. The shooting came just months after the officer and his sergeant opened fire on a 27-year-old man and killed him in 2017.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

On Christmas Eve in 1975, Vicki Hennessy worked her first shift inside a San Francisco jail. Decades later, she went on to be elected San Francisco’s first female sheriff.

Peg Hunter

UPDATE: 8/7/2019: Jose Armando Escobar-Lopez has been released from immigration detention
 

Since the start of August, activists have been protesting in front of San Francisco’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters. It's one of a month-long series of protests, part of what they’re calling the Month of Momentum, shedding light on ICE raids that happen in cities across the country.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

After Stephon Clark was shot and killed by Sacramento police last year, state lawmakers proposed a bill to change the law around when officers can open fire. Activists rallied behind the bill. But when strictest stipulations of the bill were removed to win over law enforcement groups, some withdrew their support. Assembly Bill 392 has now passed the Senate Floor, and California's Governor is expected to sign it. 

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

One year ago today, two police officers shot and killed an unarmed black man, Stephon Clark, in his grandmother’s backyard in Sacramento.

Steve Baker / Used under CC BY-ND 2.0 / cropped

A new law went into effect this year, requiring police to release certain disciplinary records. But some police unions are fighting to keep records hidden.

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