New Arrivals | KALW

New Arrivals

New Arrivals is a socially-distanced book tour with Bay Area authors produced by Lisa Morehouse.

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Oakland author Yodassa Williams reads from her debut novel "The Goddess Twins." This passage is of one of the main characters remembering a moment from her past when she almost drowned. Williams next book will be a memoir about her experiences as a Black femme burner. 

San Jose author Ava Homa reads from her new poetry collection, "Daughters of Smoke and Fire." It's about a sister's fight for her brother's freedom, set mainly in the Kurdish region of Iran.

Oakland author Maggie Tokuda-Hall reads from her young adult fantasy novel, "The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea." This passage from the point of view of the sea.

San Francisco author Anne Raeff reads from her new book, "Only the River." It's about displacement, revolution, and love.

Oakland author Melanie Abrams reads from her new book, "Meadowlark." It's about two teenagers who escape a strict spiritual commune.

San Francisco-based author Dorothy Hearst reads from "Bobo’s Cave of Gold." She and Pamela Berkman write the children’s series "At the Heels of History," featuring dogs and their human companions at key moments in our past.

Oakland author Adrien Aster reads from their new dystopian sci-fi thriller, "Loving R-thur." It's about a woman named X who falls in love with an artificial intelligence.

San Anselmo author Kate Milliken reads from her new novel, "Kept Animals." It's set in a southern California neighborhood of horse ranches and movie stars, and it revolves around the relationships of teenage girls.

San Francisco author Wendy Liu reads from her new book, "Abolish Silicon Valley." It's part memoir about her experience as a startup founder and software engineer, and part cultural criticism.

Lynsay Skiba / Algoquin Books

Berkeley author Bonnie Tsui reads a passage from her new book, "Why We Swim." It's about how she first fell in love with the water.

El Cerrito author Tess Taylor reads from one of her two new poetry collections, "Rift Zone." Rift Zone is set around Taylor’s hometown, a California suburb lying along the Hayward fault. Her other new collection is "Last West: Roadsongs for Dorothea Lange."

San Francisco author Marilyn Chase reads from her new book "Everything She Touched: The Life of Ruth Asawa." The artist Ruth Asawa was imprisoned as a Japanese American during World War II and later revolutionized scultpure and art education. 

Courtesy of Cara Black

San Francisco author Cara Black reads from her new book, "Three Hours in Paris."

San Francisco author C Pam Zhang reads from her new novel, "How Much of These Hills Is Gold."

Lafayette author Claudia Hagadus Long reads from her new murder mystery, "Nine Tenths of the Law."

South Bay author Beth Lisick reads from her new novel, "Edie on the Green Screen."

San Francisco author Kelly McVicker reads from her new book, "Essential Vegetable Fermentation."

Thea Matthew's Poetry Talks Grief And Celebrates Life

Sep 24, 2020

San Francisco author Thea Matthews reads from her debut book of poetry "Unearth [The Flowers]."

Berkeley writer Johanna Silver is the former garden editor of Sunset Magazine. She reads from her new book, "Growing Weed in the Garden."

Newark-based author Juliette Wade reads from her new science fiction novel, "Mazes of Power."

Rebeka Rodriguez / Feminist Press

San Francisco author Juli Delgado Lopera's coming-of-age novel "Fiebre Tropical" drops you into the life of a Columbian family that moves to Miami, in the Spanglish voice of the teenage narrator.

San Francisco author Katie Flynn's new novel, "The Companions," which came out in March, is set in the near future, with California under quarantine.

Photo by Andria Lo

Oakland author Monica Sok reads from her book of poetry, "A Nail the Evening Hangs On," which explores the Cambodian diaspora. It’s about what it means to inherit a history of genocide and process inter-generational trauma.

San Francisco author Rachel Levin teamed up with Evan Bloom from Wise Sons Deli on a book of recipes and essays called "Eat Something." She says, "It’s basically about how a Jewish life is marked by meals ... One of my favorite sections is the wedding section."

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