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How Uber And Lyft Fail To Protect Passengers & Drivers From Sexual Assault

Dec 16, 2019
Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

On this edition of Your Call, we discuss reports of sexual assault happening during Uber and Lyft rides. In an extensive report, Uber revealed they received 5,981 reports of sexual abuse of passengers and drivers between 2017 and 2018.

Cblount_photography / Flickr/Creative Commons

Some of the country's largest ride-sharing companies plan to ask California voters to guarantee that their drivers are independent contractors instead of employees.

San Francisco Proposition D: Ride-Share Tax

Oct 16, 2019
Melies The Bunny / Flickr / Creative Commons

 


 

Measure D is about traffic. 

It would create the city’s first ever tax on trips provided by ride-share companies, like Uber and Lyft. 

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

California lawmakers sent the governor a bill Wednesday that would give new wage and benefit protections to workers at so-called gig economy companies such as Uber and Lyft where people pick up jobs on their own schedule.

(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

  On this edition of Your Call’s Media Roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of Hurricane Dorian, which has left a path of destruction in its wake in the Bahamas. The Category 5 storm surge has killed at least 20 people and has severely damaged homes, hospitals, and other structures. 

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll be joined by Loretta Lynch, former president of the California Public Utilities Commission, the powerful state agency that regulates electric, natural gas, telecommunications, water, railroad, rail transit, and transportation companies. 

Uber and Lyft drivers strike ahead of IPOs

May 8, 2019
AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

In this special edition of Your Call, we'll talk about why Uber and Lyft drivers are going on strike.

The Bay Area braces for Uber & Lyft IPOs

Mar 20, 2019

On this edition of Your Call, how many millionaires can the Bay Area sustain? When Uber and Lyft go public this year, thousands of employees will become incredibly wealthy overnight. Home prices are expected to go up, making the Bay Area even more unaffordable for working class people.

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW

Taxis are notorious for driving past black travelers. Uber and Lyft have helped to level the playing field, but black riders are still more likely to have their requests canceled.

For Part 2 of our 3-Part Series on Course Correcting Climate Change, City Visions co-host Ethan Elkind  reports on the highlights of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco. 

Scorched cars and free bus rides in fire's aftermath

Oct 19, 2017
Ninna Gaensler-Debs

The North Bay fires — on top of claiming lives, homes, and businesses — also claimed vehicles. Crosscurrents host Hana Baba talked with KALW's transportation reporter Eli Wirtschafter about next steps for people who lost their cars in the wildfires.

Your Call: Regulating ride-hailing

Jun 15, 2017
Used under CC by Noel Tock www.noeltock.com / Flickr

  

We’re following up on our conversation about regulating the ride-hailing industry.

Your Call: Taxi, Uber, and Lyft drivers discuss regulations

Jun 8, 2017
Used under CC by Aaron Parecki / Wikimedia Commons

  

We’ll have a conversation with ride-hailing drivers, from taxis to Uber about how the industry ought to be regulated.

We'll have a discussion about ride hailing companies and how they are impacting transportation and life in the Bay Area. In 2016, San Francisco had the third worst traffic congestion in the nation.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

Harbir Batth isn’t having a good day. Not many fares.

 

“It's been terrible,” he tells me.

 

Then finally, some hope appears: a doorman for the Parc 55 Hotel in Union Square hails the cab over. They hop in and we’re headed to North Beach.

 

Employment Law Issues of Workers in the Shared/Gig Economy (Uber, Lyft, etc.).
Guests: Employment Law attorneys: Michael Mellema, Josh Young & Tom Lenz.
Listeners with questions for Chuck & his guests, please call toll-free 1-866-798-8255.

used under CC0 Public Domain

Instead of working just one job for a single employer, more and more of us are becoming gig workers: people who consult, freelance, contract, temp, and do jobs on-call. The number of Americans with these alternative work arrangements has been growing steadily over the last ten years. 

  Employment Law -- the shared/gig economy: Uber/Airbnb/Lyft and other work opportunities. Guests: Real Estate attorney Tad Devlin and Employment Law attorney Aaron Minnis. Listeners with questions for Chuck & his guests, please call toll-free 1-866-798-8255.

The Spot: Bad Gigs & Great Birds

Apr 16, 2015

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


Jack Alley for The New York Times

Sharing economy companies like Uber and Lyft have become a powerful part of the economy. Now, some of the workers propelling that sector are organizing to ask for more from the companies that pay them. Drivers from both companies have filed a lawsuit -- they want to be made employees rather than contractors, and receive the benefits mandated by the state of California.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 19, 2015

Feb 19, 2015
Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

King tides at Candlestick Point offer glimpse of planet’s future // SF Gate

“As this week’s king tides washed over a small beach at Candlestick Point, the San Francisco Bay became an unlikely classroom for teaching the grim reality of sea-level rise...

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California drought: Big storm on the way for Northern California // Contra Costa Times

"After the driest January in recorded history, the Bay Area is back in the rain business.


Spiros Vathis / Flickr

California regulators gave the go-ahead to ride-share apps last week, making it the first state in the nation to legalize peer-to-peer services connecting riders to drivers who use their own cars.

That's an about-face from a year ago, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) was handing out cease-and-desist letters to companies like Lyft, Sidecar, and Uber.