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Labor and Employment Law: Trends with Labor Relations, Unions, and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).
Guests: Labor and Employment Law Attorneys -- Thomas Lenz (who  represents employers) and Caren Sencer (who represents labor unions and employees).
Listeners with questions for Chuck and his guests, please call 415-841-4134.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

 

Alyssa Arian has worked in San Francisco restaurants for a decade and, like most servers, she got into it for the tips.

“Some nights you leave with $80 or $90,” she says. “$100 is kind of the average mark for what you want as a server, sort of anywhere in this city I think as a minimum.”

Since February, though, Arian hasn’t earned any tips. She’s working at Sous Beurre Kitchen, a new French spot in the Mission where tipping’s not allowed.

Jack Alley for The New York Times

Sharing economy companies like Uber and Lyft have become a powerful part of the economy. Now, some of the workers propelling that sector are organizing to ask for more from the companies that pay them. Drivers from both companies have filed a lawsuit -- they want to be made employees rather than contractors, and receive the benefits mandated by the state of California.

On the February 6th edition of  Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss the declining coverage of labor in the media. As the declining middle class, income inequality and wage stagnation have become big issues, who is focusing on the state of organized labor and why does it matter? We will also discuss the political crisis in Jordan. We will be joined by Steven Greenhouse, former NY Time’s labor reporter, and Guardian’s Martin Chulov. Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California drought: Big storm on the way for Northern California // Contra Costa Times

"After the driest January in recorded history, the Bay Area is back in the rain business.

Employment Law: Wage and Hours and Sick Leaves Laws and  Issues.
Guests: Labor and Employment Law attorneys Virginia Villegas and Scott Dauscher.
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests, please call 415-841-4134.
Our special once-a-month Call-A-Lawyer Night also is this evening. So, while Your Legal Rights broadcasts over 91.7 FM (online at kalw.org), 7 to 8pm, listeners can call the off-air attorneys, 800-525-9917, for private/no-fee consultation on any law questions they are prepared to discuss.
 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Jan 27, 2015
Leah Millis / San Francisco Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F. // SF Gate

"If it seems that San Franciscans are getting more entitled and self-absorbed, a series of psychology studies performed at UC Berkeley indicates there could be a scientific reason: the city’s increasing wealth.

Wikipedia Commons

On the January 5th, 2015 edition of Your Call, we'll speak with Richard Rothstein, research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and fellow at UC Berkeley. He argues that government actions like racially explicit zoning, public housing segregation, and federal requirements for white-only suburbs systemically segregated African Americans and set the stage for the protests and racial tension following the Michael Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri. How was our racial landscape created? And what's the way forward? It's Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

Contingent, adjunct or part-time professors make up the majority of faculty nationwide, yet many labor under difficult if not harsh conditions -- including low pay, lack of resources and minimal job security. As the slogan goes, teachers’ working conditions are students’ learning conditions. What is this emergent labor movement working to make visible, transform and achieve?

Producer: Zara Zimbardo

  Guests:

- Maria Maisto, president, New Faculty Majority

Stopping Workplace Harassment Because of Race, National Origin, Religion.
Guests:  Phil Horowitz, an Advisor to the Executive Committee of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the State Bar; Employment Law attorney Maribel Hernandez.
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests please call 415-841-4134.

(Rich Pedroncelli / AP)

 

  

On the October 2nd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss bills that impact everything from labor and education to groundwater and healthcare. Governor Brown just signed the country’s first ban on single-use plastic bags. He also signed bills to give workers 3 sick days a year, redefine sexual consent on college campuses, and extend housing to foster youth up to age 25 if they are completing a secondary education. What bills are you watching? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Guests:

Ben Trefny

 

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, San Francisco passed a variety of measures to help low wage workers try to keep up with the rising cost of living. The city now has the highest minimum wage in the country at 10 dollars 74 cents an hour. It also requires employers to either provide health benefits or pay into a pool so the city can cover their health care costs.

On September 1st edition of Your Call, on Labor Day, we’ll have a conversation with Simon Cordery, author of “Mother Jones: Raising Cain and Consciousness.” In 1902, she was called the most dangerous woman in America for her effective and creative labor organizing. How did she organize workers in early 20th century? And want can what can we learn from her activism? It’s Your Call, with me Rose Aguilar.

Guests:

Simon Cordery, chair of the History Department at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois.

Your Call: Is tipping good for workers?

Aug 13, 2014

  

 

 

On the August 13th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the history and cultural practice of tipping. The federal tipped minimum wage is only $2.13 an hour, and tipped workers are 3 times as likely to live in poverty. Is working for tips a way to boost compensation for great service? Or does it open the door for exploitation, by employers and customers? If you work for tips, would you prefer an alternative? It’s Your Call, with Matt Martin, and you.

Guests:

A mile-high look at modern US history. Is it true most male flight attendants are gay? Was it ever? How did their legal battles with airlines help advance gay rights and workplace gender equity? Is the tale of “Patient Zero” – a steward accused of being the initial transcontinental spreader of HIV – accurate? Stow your tray tables and put your seats in their fully upright and locked positions for a quick flight through the history of airline stewards. Eric Jansen's guest is Philadelphia University history professor Phil Tiemeyer, author of Plane Queer: Labor, Sexuality and AIDS in the history of male flight attendants, published by University of California Press.

AP Photo

 

By setca_bbtk, in Flickr Creative Commons



Update on Workers' Compensation Laws and Issues.
Guests are  Certified Specialists in Workers Compensation Laws:
Alice O'Sullivan, Lester Friedman, and Joshua Friedman.
Listeners with questions for Chuck and his guests, please call 415-841-4134.


AFP



East Bay Espress: The gritty life of a day laborer

Jan 15, 2014

From our partners at the East Bay Express.

Isabel Angell

Over half of Bay Area residents support a ban on transit strikes, bucking the region’s pro-union reputation, reveals a new Field Poll. The rest of the state is split, but more Californians still believe public transit workers should have the right to strike.


Labor Notes

  

Unions sue BART over contract dispute

Dec 4, 2013
Isabel Angell

BART’s biggest unions, SEIU 1021 and ATU 1555, are suing the BART Board of Directors and the district’s management over what BART is calling a “clerical mistake” in their new contract. The unions say management is trying to backtrack.

BART strike is over, tentative agreement reached

Oct 22, 2013

The BART strike is over and trains are running again after a four-day work stoppage. Unions, management, and local politicians announced a tentative agreement late Monday night.

After more than six months of negotiations and two strikes that infuriated workers, BART and its unions have a deal.

John Arantes, BART chapter president of SEIU 1021, said the strike was not about money.

BART talks continue; no strike Wednesday

Oct 16, 2013
Flickr

BART’s unions called off a strike for the fourth time in less than a week as the two sides continue to try to hammer out a deal. Around 10:30 PM on Tuesday night, federal mediator George Cohen stepped outside to confirm that talks were continuing.

“Progress is being made,” Cohen said, adding that trains would run on Wednesday. Both sides say Cohen, who helped solve the NFL and NBA labor disputes, has been an asset in the negotiations.

BART update: still no strike, still no deal

Oct 15, 2013
Isabel Angell

BART trains will continue to run on Tuesday across the Bay Area, but there’s still no deal in the six-month-long labor contract negotiations. For the third time in less than a week, BART’s unions have put off a strike to stay at the bargaining table. 

An hour after the strike deadline passed early Tuesday around 1 AM, federal mediator George Cohen told reporters the two sides were making progress.

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