India | KALW

India

Sandip Roy

How did just a few thousand British control the country of India? 

Sandip Roy

She comes once a year. Sometimes she is jet black, sometimes she is blue, a dark midnight blue or the powdery blue of a summer evening sky. While the rest of India celebrates Diwali with its sweets and fireworks, Kolkata gets ready for the arrival of the Goddess Kali, the one of the deep blue night.

Photo courtesy of Tata Steel Kolkata Literary Meet/modified from original

Many things divide a country, but it’s the overlooked, personal slights that hurt the most.

Sandip Roy

An ode to the local trains in Kolkata, moving and harboring life daily.  

Sandip Roy

A mother goes back to her parents once every year with all her children. That sounds like hardly the excuse for five days of city wide festivities. But that’s exactly what happens during Durga Puja in Kolkata.  Because This is no ordinary mother. It’s the ten-armed mother goddess Durga coming back to visit her home with her four children. And Kolkata shuts down to welcome her back.

Sandip Roy

Sandip considers the legacy of Mahatma Gandhi, 150 years after his birth.  

Photo by Basharat Shah - Flickr: Dal Lake, CC BY 2.0

Kashmir has been on Sandip’s mind lately,

Sandip Roy

  

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York.

Sandip Roy

When Queen Harish came on stage you could not look away. 

Sandip Roy/modified from original

When you play the Game of Thrones, you win or you die.

Photo by Sandip Roy

India has a new government. 

Sandip Roy/modified from original

Sandip Roy embarks on an anti-war march in a time of hastags.

Photo by Sandip Roy/modified from original

In Cricket crazy india, an obscure game played with a very strange shaped ball takes hold.

Sandip Roy: Rosogolla

Nov 28, 2018
Photo by Sandip Roy/modified from original

It looks just like a little white table tennis ball, but spongy and sweet.

Photo courtesy of third I Film Festival/modified from original

Sandip Roy misses a piece of India that can only be had in in San Francisco.

Fog City Blues: Aki Kumar

Oct 17, 2018

Indian-born, San Jose-based Aki Kumar, aka “The Only Bombay Blues Man,” left his home in Mumbai with the intention of working as a software engineer in Silicon Valley. Then he discovered the blues, and his life dramatically changed.

Photo by Sandip Roy/modified from original

Now that the Indian Supreme Court has decriminalized homosexuality, the real battles begin.

Photo by Sandip Roy/modified from original

In 1986 Trikone was like a message in a bottle floated out to sea hoping someone would find it.

Photo by Sandip Roy

Happy Independence Day India!

Photo by Sandip Roy

India’s law criminalizing homosexuality is still on the books, but it’s still a very different India than the one I came out in.

Photo courtesy of Facebook/modified from original

Shujaat Bukhari spoke to all sides and stayed true to his journalistic calling. 

courtesy Soumya Sankar Bose from the show Full Moon on a Dark Night at Experimenter, Kolkata

  Mostly when the west looks at LGBT life in India we see images of raucous Pride parades despite the law that criminalizes gay sex, 

Sandip Roy: Don't mess with Kali

Oct 18, 2017
Photo by Sandip Roy/modified from original

I’ve always felt diffident about our Kali. She seems difficult to explain to the uninitiated. 

Photo courtesy of Sandip Roy/modified from original

70 years after Independence it sometimes feels as if Indians are still to develop a funny bone.

Photo by Sandip Roy/modified from original

The arch diocese of Kolkata was set up in 1886, and it's saint is St Francis Xavier. But then along came Mother Teresa 

Amar Kapoor kept a diary after migrating to Delhi following the blood-drenched summer of 1947 from Lahore via the border city of Amritsar, where the family spent three months on the veranda of a house.
Courtesy of the Partition Museum/modified from original

This August 15th marked 70 years of India’s independence.  But this also marks 70 years of one of India’s greatest human tragedies. 

Photo courtesy Sandip Roy/modified from original

Sandip Roy reflects on India’s journey as it turns 70.

Photo courtesy of Sandip Roy

Chickens cannot fly.  That’s according to Air India, India’s national airline. 

Courtesy Virendra Singh Gosain/Hindustani Times, modified from original

There have been other mob attacks in India before three Nigerians were beaten in a mall in Delhi on March 27. Each time the government promises stringent action.

Courtesy of Sandip Roy

A currency note is a promise. The government is holding that promise in abeyance, even breaking that trust, by promising a better future. 

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