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immigration

Ash Ponders

Most religions teach people to help those in need. But what happens when that mandate clashes with how the government views the law? In this story from The Spiritual Edge, we hear how federal prosecutors cracked down on volunteers providing aid on the border. 

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters


  On this edition of Your Call, we're discussing last week's Supreme Court decision to block the Trump Administration from ending DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Mike Kai Chen

In April, nearly 4,000 Mission District residents volunteered to get tested for COVID-19 and its antibodies. Unidos en Salud released the results of that testing on Monday, which raise difficult questions about racial and class disparities in San Francisco.

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW

Because of the coronavirus, justice is moving more slowly in California. Jury trials have been suspended, and hearings have been delayed. But immigration courthouses are still open. In this interview, Francisco Ugarte, an immigration attorney with San Francisco’s Public Defender’s Office, speaks about how this pandemic has changed deportation hearings. 

Jae C. Hong / AP Photo

Domestic workers are using lessons learned from California’s wildfires to support their communities through the COVID-19 pandemic. They’re also pushing for legislation that could protect workers in future disasters.

Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

This story was updated with additional reporting on March 18, 2020 at 8:21pm.

The Bay Area’s historic shelter-in-place order is intended to slow the spread of COVID-19, the novel coronavirus. But it could have a profound impact on low-wage workers, who live month-to-month. Low-wage immigrant workers are particularly vulnerable, and some of the programs available to them are struggling to stay up and running.

Click the play button to listen to the full story.

On this edition of Your Call, we speak with law professor César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández about his new book Migrating to Prison: America’s Obsession with Locking Up Immigrants.

Reed Saxon / AP Photo

Climate change is fueling devastating wildfires in California, and in some cases, low-wage immigrant workers are cleaning up after them. They sweep ash out of houses and strip debris from burned buildings.

Ringo H.W. Chiu / AP Photo

In October 2019, a stretch of dry weather and strong winds sparked dozens of wildfires across California, killing three people and destroying hundreds of homes. For the low-wage immigrants who work in those homes, fire season brings its own dangers.

Eric Risberg / AP Photo

Last January, the Supreme Court ruled that the Trump administration can begin implementing its expanded “public charge” rule, which could systematically deny green cards to low-income immigrants. 

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

On January 1, California became the first state in the country to extend Medicaid benefits to all low-income adults, regardless of their immigration status. Over 100,000 additional Californians are eligible for health coverage under the new law, the latest piece of legislation in the state’s ongoing push for universal health coverage.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

In 2019, the United Nations reported that an unprecedented number of people have been forced to flee their home countries. Over 70 million people are currently displaced worldwide, and the global refugee population is expected to increase in 2020.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

In 2019, the UN’s Refugee Agency reported that an unprecedented number of people had been forced to flee their home countries. Over 70 million people are currently displaced worldwide, and the global refugee population is expected to increase in 2020.

On this edition of Your Call, we discuss ‘Kids Caught in the Crackdown,’ a FRONTLINE documentary about the detention of children inside federally-funded migrant shelters.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

  

The H-1B is one of the most commonly-used work visas in the United States, and the Trump Administration is denying them at a record rate. Data reporter Sinduja Rangarajan spent eight months investigating why.

Eric Gay / AP Photo

The Trump Administration is expanding its Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), a policy that says asylum seekers at the US-Mexican border must remain in Mexico while they wait for their hearings.

Chris Carlson / AP Photo

Last month, California became the first state in the nation to abolish private prisons. Lawmakers include immigration detention centers in their bill — most of those are run by private companies. But Immigration and Customs Enforcement is fighting back. Bay Area politicians accuse the agency of bending federal law so that it can continue detaining immigrants in California.

Philosophy Talk: Sanctuary Cities

Nov 19, 2019

What rights should undocumented immigrants have?


Courtesy of Celadon Books

Aarti Shahani is NPR’s tech reporter. You may have heard her stories over the years from Silicon Valley on everything from Facebook privacy policies, to H1-B visas, to the latest iPhone features and apps. But in her new memoir, Here We Are, she doesn’t tell tech stories, she tells the story of her immigrant Indian family, that includes strife, tests of patriotism, and even the criminal justice system.

Courtesy of Juanita Chavez

Ethnic Maya from Central America are escaping gang-related violence and food insecurity and building new communities in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Adriana Morga / KALW

President Trump’s had both strong rhetoric and policies on immigration during his presidency. One way that immigrants’ lives are impacted is through remittances — money sent from the U.S. to other countries. 

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

The Bay Area is home to some of the most powerful tech companies in the world, and many of them provide essential services to government agencies.

Evan Vucci / AP Photos

San Francisco and Santa Clara counties became the first in the nation last week to sue the Trump Administration over its controversial "public charge" rule. 

On A Corner In San Rafael, Day Laborers Wait — And Worry

Aug 21, 2019
Ninna Gaensler-Debs

You’ve probably seen them: groups of men looking for work, standing in front of Home Depot or waiting on corners of busy thoroughfares. These men are day laborers, looking for short-term work ranging from gardening to painting. 

Peg Hunter

UPDATE: 8/7/2019: Jose Armando Escobar-Lopez has been released from immigration detention
 

Since the start of August, activists have been protesting in front of San Francisco’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement headquarters. It's one of a month-long series of protests, part of what they’re calling the Month of Momentum, shedding light on ICE raids that happen in cities across the country.

Marco Ugarte / AP Images

The Trump Administration has announced a wave of harsh immigration policies this month, and civil rights groups are fighting back with lawsuits. One of these legal battles began Wednesday morning in San Francisco, where a case filed by the East Bay Sanctuary Covenant and other organizations could help determine the fate of thousands of asylum seekers.

Sara Nora Koust / KALW

In the past decade, over 1,800 trans and gender-diverse people have been reported murdered in Latin America. Probably hundreds more were never reported.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

When we first interviewed Elizabeth Chan, she was standing in front of San Francisco’s immigration building, saying goodbye to her only son. She’s been fighting his deportation order ever since and told us how that fight has changed her.

AP Photo

Last month, the Trump Administration argued before the Ninth Circuit that the government is not required to provide toothbrushes, soap or beds to the migrant children it detains. That argument was relentlessly criticized by the three-judge panel presiding over the case, and their comments quickly viral.

Cedar Attanasio / Associated Press

 


 

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss reports of deplorable conditions inside immigration detention facilities in the US. 

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