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Reimagining Dementia With Dr. Tia Powell

Jul 24, 2019

  

On this edition of Your Call, Dr. Tia Powell joins us to discuss her new book, Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End. More than five million people in the US have dementia. As 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, that number will likely rise.

For Asians, Latinos, and other ethnic minorities, the end of life presents unique challenges. Language barriers and cultural traditions can often inhibit access to hospice, pain management, and comfort care.

Courtesy of Zen Hospice Project

 

For nearly three decades, the guest house of San Francisco’s Zen Hospice Project has helped the dying live out their last days with dignity. In a large, immaculately kept Victorian-style home, caregivers paid attention to patients’ physical, emotional and spiritual needs. It was known as a special place. But due to a lack of funds, the guesthouse closed in June. And unless a donor steps up, the closure could be permanent. As a way of remembering the guesthouse, we’re re-airing an interview with BJ Miller, former director of the Zen Hospice Project.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

Navy veteran Ron Ekika Riveira Jr. says that when you first see him and all his tattoos, you might see a “big bad scary-looking Hell’s Angels guy.” But if you look closer, you'll see that the ink tells a different, much more surprising story.

JoAnn Mar

There's an increased use of live music at Bay Area’s major hospitals and hospices to bring healing and comfort to people who are near death.

StoryCorps: Facilitating a 'good death'

Apr 11, 2016
San Francisco StoryCorps

As a Zen Hospice Project volunteer, Alastair Shanks sits at the bedsides of people who are dying at the Laguna Honda, a public hospital in San Francisco that serves the indigent and homeless. Many of those he accompanies are lost to the world through dementia. In this installment of StoryCorps, Shanks speaks with fellow volunteer Mary Doane about the care he takes to make sure each person has a “good death.”

Dawn Gross, MD, PhD has been caring for people with life-threatening illnesses for over a decade. She is committed to revolutionizing the way we talk about — and prepare for — death.  On her special KALW series Dying To Talk, she and her guests will create a safe space to transform the experience of end-of-life conversations from dread to discovery.

Managing Grief

Jan 1, 2015

How do we cope with the death of a spouse or lover? Or of a parent or sibling with whom we had a troubled relationship?  What particular challenges do LGBT people face in grieving? Surveys show that most Americans consider the loss of someone’s unmarried partner less traumatic for the survivor than the loss of a wife or husband. Where does that leave gay men and lesbians whose partners die? Bereavement experts say many minorities suffer "disenfranchised grief" - grief not fully recognized by society. On this week's Out in the Bay (7pm Thursday), Eric Jansen and guests discuss these and other aspects of grief and loss.  (First aired March 27, 2014; re-broadcast 7pm PST January 1, 2015)

Unique choir gives comfort to the dying

May 12, 2014
Jeanne Finley

Music has a special power that we all recognize. It can make us dance or sing along. It can make us happy, sad, reflective, agitated or calm. We can hear it live, or recorded. But seldom do we have a small choir serenade us - only us - at our bedsides.

That’s what The Threshold Choir does-- but not everyone can request these services. They only sing to a specific group of people: the infirm or dying.