healthcare | KALW

healthcare

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

On January 1, California became the first state in the country to extend Medicaid benefits to all low-income adults, regardless of their immigration status. Over 100,000 additional Californians are eligible for health coverage under the new law, the latest piece of legislation in the state’s ongoing push for universal health coverage.

Flickr user KitAy, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

Hey Area is where we find answers to questions you ask. One listener wanted to know, "Where is the best place in East Oakland to buy fresh produce with WIC vouchers?"

Philosophy Talk: The Limits of Medical Consent

Oct 25, 2019

Who has the right to decide my own medical treatment other than me?

Reimagining Dementia With Dr. Tia Powell

Jul 24, 2019

  

On this edition of Your Call, Dr. Tia Powell joins us to discuss her new book, Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End. More than five million people in the US have dementia. As 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, that number will likely rise.

 


 

On the next Your Call, we’ll talk about the importance of social services to public health.

Christine Nguyen / KALW

Many people don’t recognize dementia, and not recognizing it can lead to death. Most caregivers are unprepared to manage dementia in their own family. And, for many ethnic minorities, such as Vietnamese, there is little support.

Host Joseph Pace and guests explore the ways in which artificial intelligence (AI) will impact US healthcare.  

Cary Bass-Deschenes / Flikr Creative Commons, used under CC BY-SA 2.0

So many people are dying from opioid overdoses in the United States that these deaths have fueled an overall decline in life expectancy in 2017. Doctors in the Bay Area are responding by bringing medication for opioid addiction to people in unconventional places, like homeless encampments, emergency rooms, hospitals, and jails.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

In California, deaths related to Fentanyl overdoses have spiked, and it’s still hard to find treatment for opioid addiction. A medication called buprenorphine, more commonly known by the brand name Suboxone, can help.

How would Medicare for All work?

Jan 8, 2019
Amanda Mills |USCDCP

 


 

On this edition of Your Call, we discuss how Medicare for All would actually work.

Image via National Union of Healthcare Workers


On this special edition of Your Call, we'll find out why Kaiser Permanente therapists, social workers, and other mental health workers are on a five-day strike across California.

Photo: National Cancer Institute

Open enrollment for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act ends December 15. Though many states are seeing plan prices drop, so far about 400,000 fewer people have signed up.

JoAnn Mar

The end of life is not easy for most people nearing death. Over half of all Americans experience unwanted pain and suffering during their final days. The numbers are even greater for people of color.


On this week’s media roundtable, we'll discuss coverage of the midterm elections. According to a Gallup Poll, healthcare and the economy were at the top of the list of voters’ concerns. Voters in Idaho, Nebraska and Utah approved initiatives to expand Medicaid, and Arkansas and Missouri voted for a higher minimum wage.

Christine Nguyen / KALW News

Medical care for transgender youth is a new and evolving field. Many doctors don’t know the terminology, best practices, or how to make referrals to specialists. KALW reporter Christine Nguyen, a pediatrician herself, spent some time exploring how health professionals are learning about the medical care of transgender kids.

On this special edition of Your Call, we remember Stan Brock, founder of Remote Area Medical (RAM), an all-volunteer mobile medical clinic that’s been traveling to cities across the United States offering free healthcare since 1992. 

Image via the Poor People's Campaign

 On this edition of Your Call, we speak with activists about the Poor People’s Campaign.

Charlotte Cooper, used under Creative Commons license, via Flickr

Reproductive rights, protections against sexual assault, transgender rights, and access to healthcare are all under attack. Patients are scrambling to find care, pregnant inmates are overcrowded in jails, and women's health is suffering under budget cuts. The news site Rewire extensively documents what is happening to reproductive rights and justice. How should journalists hold legislators accountable for their attacks on women's health? 

Karl Mondon / Bay Area News Group

  

In 1967, during a public health meeting at UCSF, Dr. David Smith declared that health care is a right, not a privilege. Shortly thereafter, he opened the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic.

  

Even though the Republican plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act is dead for now, far too many of us are still stuck with high premiums and plans that don’t provide adequate coverage. We’re constantly told that we need to shop around for the best plan.

 

  

On Wednesday afternoon, the Senate rejected a plan to repeal major parts of the Affordable Care Act without providing a replacement. Seven Republicans and every Democrat voted against it.

This week, Senate Republicans postponed the vote for their healthcare bill, which was secretly written by 13 men. The bill slashes Medicaid funding while cutting taxes by nearly $1 trillion over the next decade, mostly for the rich and corporations.  

Your Call: California leading the fight for single-payer health care

Jun 7, 2017

  

Will California make single-payer healthcare a reality? On June 1st the state Senate voted in favor of single-payer health care.

ELECTION BRIEFS: Prop 52 - Private hospitals funding Medi-Cal

Oct 26, 2016


 

Proposition 52 has to do with how California funds Medi-Cal. Medi-Cal is the state’s version of Medicaid, the low income health care program. In order for California to get federal Medicaid funding, it has to put up matching dollars.

More than 75% of our $3 trillion health care spending is on people with chronic conditions.

Philosophy Talk asks about life and death in prison

Jan 12, 2016

What rights should convicted felons be expected to forfeit before prison becomes cruel and unusual punishment?


tkamenick / Creative Commons

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Shit Storm: Why won't SF stop flooding homes with sewage? // SF Weekly

"San Francisco's sewers have a flooding problem. The city knows it. The residents who deal with it know it. But there's no indication that one of the richest cities in America is doing anything to stop an inevitable flood of shit from pouring into the homes and businesses of certain residents.

On the September 24th edition of Your Call, author and doctor Damon Tweedy joins us to talk about his new book, Black Man in a White Coat. 

Angela Johnston

This story originally aired on December 9, 2014.

At the Livermore Veteran’s Hospital, there are a few animals residents can see: wild turkeys that run around the grounds, rattlesnakes that hide out in the dry grass, and therapy dogs that make weekly visits. But there’s one animal in particular that Bryce Lee is always happy to see: a baby harp seal.

 

  

On the October 29th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a debate on Proposition 46, the ballot initiative that would raise the cap on damages in malpractice suits and enforce mandatory drug testing on doctors. Supporters of Proposition 46 argue that medical negligence is too common and pain and suffering damage awards are too low. Opponents say the initiative isn’t about protecting patients, but increasing medical lawsuit payouts to trial lawyers. Election Day is next week - what questions do you have on Proposition 46? It’s Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

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