end of life | KALW

end of life

Yunfei Ren

San Francisco lost one of its most influential queer elders this year. Phyllis Lyon was a lesbian activist and trailblazer. She died in April at the age of 95. Phyllis developed dementia in her final years and was able to live independently in her own home. Or so she thought. A community of lesbian, queer, and trans people supported her with kindness... and deceit.

BJ Miller, Shoshana Berger and Lucy Kalanithi provide step-by- step instructions on managing the end of life, and answer questions about death that we’re all afraid to ask.

Reimagining Dementia With Dr. Tia Powell

Jul 24, 2019

  

On this edition of Your Call, Dr. Tia Powell joins us to discuss her new book, Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End. More than five million people in the US have dementia. As 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, that number will likely rise.

Lasting Letters: Leaving a legacy behind

Mar 6, 2019
Jeremy Jue

 

“Lasting Letters: Leaving a legacy behind” reports on legacy letters and how they are helping people prepare for death, say goodbye, and grieve loved ones after they are gone.  

For Asians, Latinos, and other ethnic minorities, the end of life presents unique challenges. Language barriers and cultural traditions can often inhibit access to hospice, pain management, and comfort care.

Reimagining life and death in San Francisco

Apr 12, 2018
Courtesy of ReImagine

 

On the Apr. 12, 2018 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, JoAnn Mar and guests will discuss careers helping people at the end of life, and a major event: Reimagine End of Life, occurring Apr 16 - 22 in San Francisco.

Death comes out of the closet this week on KALW!  This Wednesday at 7 pm (PDT), join us on 91.7 for a special in-depth documentary on “Palliative Care:  The Search for Comfort and Healing In The Face of Death.”   Physicians, dying patients, and family members speak out on the need for good care at the end of life.  Most Americans polled want to spend their final days in comfort, free of pain.   Planning ahead can help ensure that your wishes will be honored when the time comes.  If you’re not around for the live broadcast, the program will be available at 

JoAnn Mar

There's an increased use of live music at Bay Area’s major hospitals and hospices to bring healing and comfort to people who are near death.

JoAnn Mar

 

Death is an uncomfortable subject for many people.  The way we die is one of the most important conversations Americans are not having.  But during the last five years, a movement to break the silence has been growing.

For National Healthcare Decisions Week, Dr. Dawn Gross welcomes social worker Bridget Sumser, an expert in helping people begin conversations around planning for the end of life.

In October 2016,  over 2000 people took part in more than 30 events across the Bay Area as part of the first-ever Reimagine End of Life Festival

On June 9, 2016, physician aid-in-dying became legal in California.

Most Americans are unprepared for the worst to happen—an accident or an unexpected illness that leaves them brain dead, but still alive.  That's what happened to Terri Schiavo, a young woman who became comatose after suffering a heart attack in 1990.  

JoAnn Mar

The average life span has nearly doubled during the last century.  But while people are living longer, they're now facing health challenges that were less prevalent before—severe chronic illness, cancer, lung disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's—debilitating conditions that often cause great pain and suffering. 

 

I thought my family had all the pieces in place, until the crisis happened and that’s when I realized how woefully unprepared we were. My 91-year-old father had fallen in the early morning hours and was unable to get up from the bathroom floor.

What do Halloween, Day of the Dead and All Saints Day have in common? They each transform the taboo around talking about death. 

  “If I had a magic wand, what would you wish for?”  April 16th is Advanced Care Planning Day - an opportunity to have a conversation with loved ones about what matters most in life, and how we want to face death. 

August 31, 2015.  Brittany Maynard brought end-of-life decisions to the attention of Californians, but nearly a year after her death state law still prevents terminally ill patients from ending their lives.  But a bill has been introduced that might change that. 

Where do you stand on the right to die movement? On the March 10th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about a right to die bill in California. The renewed push for legislation comes after brain cancer patient Brittany Maynard moved to Oregon where she legally ended her life on November 1. Proponents of the bill say we should have the right to die with dignity. Opponents say people with disabilities and the elderly could be coerced into ending their lives. Where do you stand?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar and you.

A note to our listeners and readers: We’ve changed the name of the patient in this story for privacy reasons.

It’s a busy Monday morning at the San Francisco Veterans Association Medical Center. Palliative care physicians Alex Smith and Katherine Aragon, along with their intern Sara Murray, gather in the lobby. They’re on their way to see a patient, Bill Jones – a gentleman in his 60s who has a form of slow-growing cancer.