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disability

The Americans With Disabilities Act and the Obligations of Small Businesses. Guests: Steven Schraibman, ADA Compliance Expert/Architect; Martin Orlick, ADA Compliance  Attorney; Regina Dick-Endrizzi, Executive Director, Office of Small Business, County of San Francisco; and Carole Conn, Director of Public Service Programs, San Francisco Bar Assn.

A musician, going deaf, fights for a life in music

Jul 21, 2014
Rachel Wong

 

 

From the moment Sandy Mix wakes up in the morning, she is thinking about music. Over coffee, she plans the day’s lessons.

“I can’t believe how lucky I am, because everybody wants to do the thing that they love, and hardly anybody gets to do it,” she says.

The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) -- Consumers' Rights, the Obligations of Businesses, and the Help Available to Small Businesses.
Guests: Steven Schraibman, ADA Compliance Expert; Martin Orlick, ADA Compliance Attorney; Regina Dick-Endrizzi, Exec. Director of the San Francisco Office of Small Business; and Carole Conn, Director of Public Service Programs, San Francisco Bar Assn.
Listeners with questions for Chuck's guests, please call 415-841-4134.

An inmate learns about self through caring for others

May 5, 2014
Nigel Poor

KALW has partnered with radio producers inside California's oldest prison to bring you the San Quentin Prison Report, a series of stories focusing on the experiences of these men, written and produced by those living inside the prison's walls.

Sandy Rasheed Lockheart is 35 years old. In 2002, he robbed four men at gunpoint outside of a Walmart store in Lancaster, CA. He was arrested, convicted, and sentenced to 24 years in state prison.

Prison time hasn’t been easy. He has gotten in trouble for refusing a cellmate, contraband, cell fighting, refusing a direct order, and being involved in a prison riot. Despite that, in 2009, he was entrusted with an extraordinary responsibility.

David DeSilva

Three dancers are sweating under their choreographer’s demanding eye. They turn, jump, and lean into each other, flowing across the room. The sound of bare feet mixes with the squeaking of rubber against the floor.

That’s the sound of dancer Joel Brown’s wheelchair. As he propels into a turn, the other dancers, Sonsheree Giles and Sebastian Grubb, match his movements, but on their feet. Then choreographer Marc Brew, who’s been watching from the front of the studio, glides over to the trio. He’s also in a wheelchair.

This is a rehearsal for AXIS Dance Company, a pioneer in a dance form it calls “physically integrated dance,” which uses both disabled and non-disabled dancers. Though AXIS has been around for more than 20 years, it’s still rare to see this kind of work.

  

On today's Your Call, we'll rebroadcast a conversation we had with longtime disability rights activists. One of the most important aspects of the disability rights movement was the focus on independent living, which emerged in California in the 1960s. Five decades later, people with disabilities are still on the front lines, often getting arrested in Washington DC . What gains have they made and what are they still fighting for?  That’s on the next Your Call with Rose Aguilar and You.

Guests:

Suzy Clement

 

The birth of a child is life-changing. For the wallet, the lifestyle and the fact that there’s another human to care for.

But for many California families, there’s an extra challenge to think about. According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, one in ten of the state’s children has a special health care need, including an intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, or autism.

One of those children is six-year old Lucien Gonzalez.

Back when Lucien was nine months old, his parents began to notice he was missing some milestones. For example, he took a long time to sit up and crawl. At 11 months, they started to make some calls. They made an appointment with a neurologist. And they contacted the East Bay Regional Center to get their son assessed.

Seth Samuel

The weekend is a time for relaxing or maybe going to dinner and a show with friends. One typical scenario is you meet up with them, get dinner. Now, imagine you walk into a restaurant and it’s dark. Pitch dark. It’s not a power outage; this is darkness by design. Welcome to Blind Café.

Employment Law - the Americans With Disabilities Act Issues in the Workplace. 

Guests:  Employment Law attorneys:  Bryan Schwartz and John Hyland.

Listeners please call with questions or comments for Chuck and his guests: 415-841-4134.  

Employment Law - the Americans With Disabilities Act Issues in the Workplace. 

Guests:  Employment Law attorneys:  Bryan Schwartz and John Hyland.

Listeners please call with questions or comments for Chuck and his guests: 415-841-4134.  

Education Rights of Children with Disabilities.

Guests:  Susan Foley, Special Education Rights attorney,
and Kathryn Meola, Deputy County Counsel, San Mateo County.

Listeners are invited to call with questions/comments for Chuck and his guests: 415-841-4134.
 

On today's Your Call, we'll have a conversation about how veterans are navigating the VA system. More than a million vets are currently waiting for their benefits claims to be processed. And the average wait time is 273 days. We’ve heard these stories for years. Why is this still happening? Join us at 10 or post a comment here. President Obama had promised to revamp what he calls a “broken VA bureaucracy.” So what has changed under his administration? It's Your Call with Holly Kernan and You.

Guest:

On the Nov. 18, 2012 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, I'll moderate a debate: Is the Americans with Disabilities Act a net positive for the workplace and for society?

Taking the affirmative side will be top disabilities advocate, who has argued before the Supreme Court, Claudia Center. She'll be debating libertarian Cato Institute senior fellow who also runs Overlawyered.com, Walter Olson.

In the 2nd half of the show, I'll do three-minute career makeovers on callers.

Chuck Finney is joined by a panel from the San Francisco Bar Association to discuss the Americans with Disabilities Act protections for persons with disabilities.

The California Department of Health has issued a scathing report about a board-and-care home for people with disabilities in Sonoma County.

The Sonoma Developmental Center houses about 500 patients in the city of Eldridge. California Watch obtained a copy of the nearly 500 page document which details numerous citations of neglect and abuse by staff, including sexual abuse and violence, as well as lack of action on these cases by on-site law enforcement.

Working in landlord-tenant law, Oakland attorney Clifford Fried has seen his fair share of bogus service animals. But one particular cat owner — unfortunately, or maybe presciently, named Kitty — was exceptional. While renting an apartment in San Mateo County, Kitty began amassing a brood of felines, despite the property's no-pets clause. She already had acquired four cats by the time her landlord got wind of them. By then, Kitty was habitually flushing cat litter down the toilet, posing a major threat to the building's plumbing system. The landlord finally confronted her.

Heike Liss

One hundred years ago, on a late May evening in Paris, an 11-minute ballet so scandalized audiences that it’s still making waves today.

“Afternoon of a Faun” was choreographed by then-23-year-old Vaslav Nijinsky for the Ballet Russes. The dancers were barefoot and the angular movements of the dance rejected the formal constraints of classical ballet. Then there was the issue of the subject matter, which was overtly sexual in a way that audiences of the time had never seen. 

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