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As the United States reckons with our history of racism and a pandemic that is disproportionately impacting people of color, race promises to feature front and center in this year's election.  But can Democrats talk about race and still win?  

Courtesy WNYC Studios

  

On this edition of Your Call, we examine class. When surveyed, the vast majority of people in the US say they are either middle class or working class. The truth is, we are experiencing record inequality. How does class shape our lives?

Photo courtesy of Snapdeal.com/image modified from original

 Sometimes it seems 70 years after Independence India is just unable to shake off its suited and booted colonial hangover. 

Your Call: The High Cost of Summer

Jun 28, 2017
Photo by flickr user amira_a

  

For many working families, summer isn’t a break at all--in fact, with school out, it can be the most difficult and expensive time of the year.

Philosophy Talk: Racial Profiling and Implicit Bias

Jun 27, 2017

Is it human nature to react to new objects on the basis of visible traits and past experiences?


 

On the September 19th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with history professor Nancy Isenberg about her new book White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America.

Your Call: The untold history of class in America

Aug 1, 2016

On the August 1st edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with historian professor Nancy Isenberg about her new book White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America.

HOLLY J. MCDEDE

 

Street protests and town hall meetings swiftly followed the shooting death  by police last week of 26-year-old Mario Woods in San Francisco’s Bayview district.

Philosophy Talk asks: Should hurtful words be forbidden?

Mar 14, 2015

Some words, like n****r, ch*nk, and c*nt, are so forbidden that we won't even spell them out here. Decent people simply don't use these words to refer to others; they are intrinsically disrespectful. But aren't words just strings of sounds or letters? Words have life because they express ideas. But in a free society, how can we prohibit the expression of ideas? How can we forbid words? Where does the strange power of curses, epithets, and scatological terms come from?

Daily news roundup for Thursday, February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

OPD Still Appears to be Targeting Blacks // East Bay Express

Whether for counterterrorism measures, street level crime, or immigration, racial profiling of minorities occurs frequently. However, racial profiling is illegal under many jurisdictions and many might say ineffective. Is racial profiling ever moral or is it always an unjustified form of racism? Is there any evidence that certain races or ethnic groups have a tendency to behave in particular ways? Or is racial stereotyping a result of deeply-held biases we're not even aware of?