civil liberties | KALW

civil liberties

Eric Risberg / AP Images

The Oakland City Council voted to ban the use of facial recognition technology last week. The software is used by police around the country to find wanted suspects and find missing children. But civil liberties advocates say the technology can lead to wrongful arrests and convictions.

Photo by John Orvis

 

On this edition of next Your Call, listen to our conversation about building solidarity across communities to protect civil rights and liberties.

Flikr User Thomas Hawk / used under CC BY-NC 2.0

BART riders are on edge after a spate of killings on the system, including the brutal stabbing of 18-year-old Nia Wilson. In the wake of the violence, the transit agency announced plans for a $28 million dollar security package. That proposal includes a ban on panhandling, a fierce crackdown on fare evasion, and a ramped up surveillance system.

Courtesy of Firuzeh Mahmoudi/modified from original

Firuzeh Mahmoudi's organization United4Iran is using technology to improve civil liberties in Iran.

"Surveillance Screen" by Flickr user marcokalmann, Cropped from original: http://bit.ly/2gtOTvn

 

While he was running for President, Donald Trump made it clear he’d be willing to spy on Muslims. "I want surveillance of certain mosques, if that's okay. And you know what?" Trump said, "We've had it before and we'll have it again."

 


Civil Liberties: Is Our Right of Privacy Gone? 

Guests:  Hanni Fakhoury, Staff Attorney, the Electronic Frontier Foundation; Ben Rosenfeld, an attorney who specializes in police misconduct cases, civil rights cases and criminal defense law; and Shahid Buttar, Executive Director of the Bill of Rights Defense Committee.

Listeners: please call-in with questions/comments for the guests: 415-841-4134.