cannabis | KALW

cannabis

Event Permits Bring Cannabis To Bay Area Music Festivals

Sep 25, 2019
Ariella Markowitz

If you haven’t been to Outside Lands, the music festival held each August in Golden Gate Park, here’s the rundown. The youth, with way better fashion taste than you, are paying 10 dollars for boba tea. Their poor Instagram friends … are hella jealous.

Holly J. McDede / KALW

Three years ago, Oakland adopted a policy to help people busted for marijuana crimes get into the legal market. Alphonso T. Blunt is the first equity applicant benefiting from this program with a dispensary open for business.

Shannon Price / iStock

One year after legalization, has California's cannabis business been booming as people hoped or is it a bust? What are the challenges of doing business in an industry that had a thriving black market, but is now highly regulated? 

Holly J. McDede / KALW News

Ever since recreational cannabis went legal in California, cannabis tourism companies started popping up around the state. They offer travelers a chance to smoke and sip wine, paint and puff, and learn cannabis factoids while lighting it up.

Angela Johnston

 

This November, voters in a handful of cities around the Bay Area will be voting on cannabis taxes.

CC0 Public Domain

Proposition D is known as the Marijuana Business Tax Increase. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors put the measure on the ballot to add another tax onto cannabis businesses operating in the city.

CBD—snake oil or panacea?

Sep 11, 2018
Nikolas Harter / KALW News

Have you heard about the popular new cannabis health product, CBD? THC’s non-psychoactive cousin, CBD gained fame earlier this decade after being used to successfully treat children with intractable epilepsy. Since then it’s been claimed to alleviate a whole host of conditions, including anxiety, inflammation, pain, and even acne.

Lee Romney / KALW News

A growing number of parents whose kids suffer from seizures have discovered that medical cannabis can reduce their frequency and intensity. Over the past few years, seven states have passed laws giving kids access to that medicine while they’re at school. California’s not quite there. For one Santa Rosa family the stakes are high and the fight isn’t over.

Flikr user Rusty Blazenhoff used underUNDER CC BY-NC 2.0 / CROPPED AND RESIZED

When recreational cannabis was legalized in California just over six months ago, the people championing legal weed had high hopes. Growers could emerge out of the shadows into the light. People arrested during the War on Drugs could become CEOs of cannabis empires. Millions of dollars worth of tax revenue would ooze out of marijuana plants right into the government’s pockets. But cannabis trade groups also warned regulations would push some people out.

flickr user Dank Depot via creative commons

  

On this edition of Your Call: Now that marijuana is legal in California, who will benefit? And how will racially biased drug laws change?

Amber Miller

 

California is becoming the largest legal marijuana market in the nation. It’s estimated that the industry will bring in more than $1 billion in taxes every year.

nyuhuhuu / Flickr / Creative Commons

Many messy discrepancies remain between state and federal law regarding cannabis use. For the estimated 5 millions immigrants living in California who are not U.S. citizens, the stakes are high — especially when it comes cannabis.

Our immigration reporter Ninna Gaensler-Debs tells us more about what Proposition 64 will mean for immigrants here in the Bay Area. 

Angela Johnston

 

Ben Durkee is a true Trinity local. He’s lived and worked in the Northern California county his entire life.  

Your Call: Is your city ready for legalized pot?

Dec 5, 2017
Jim Wilson/Redux

  

California voters legalized the recreational use and sale of marijuana on a statewide basis. The law is set to go into effect on January 1. The roll out will depend on decisions made at the local level. The prospects for legal cannabis could look very different in Berkeley, San Francisco, and San Jose. What are the major differences? How do you want marijuana to be sold and marketed where you live? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Renee Kemp, and you.

Guests:

"Marijuana" by CC Flickr user Memento Mori, resized and recropped

 

Pot smokers throughout California are looking toward January 1, when marijuana will be legally available to adults. It was made possible last election when Prop. 64 passed.

 

But there are some major snags.

Dani is twenty-two years old. She was born in Mexico and moved to Richmond when she was three. About a year ago, she started working at a cannabis dispensary. It’s more than just a job. She identifies as a “first generation bud tender” - one of the first people to openly sell cannabis now that it’s becoming legal in California. She's proud of her role, but it hasn’t been easy. Cannabis is still not federally legal so as an immigrant, she's working in a legal grey area. Plus, her family wasn’t too happy with her work.

Creative Commons

This story originally aired in August of 2016. 

Kelly Quirke, community engagement coordinator for Harborside Health Center, a medical marijuana dispensary in Oakland, finds it ironic that so many people he deals with in their 60s and 70s are adamant about not getting high on cannabis.

Creative Commons

 

In November, California voters will decide whether or not to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. It’s Prop 64 on your ballot. Already, the medicinal use of marijuana has been legal since voters passed a proposition back in 1996.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, June 23, 2016

Jun 23, 2016
By Flickr user Ben Drake, used under CC / Resized and cropped

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 

House Democrats’ Gun-Control Sit-In Turns Into Chaotic Showdown With Republicans // New York Times

Behind the scenes on a pot farm in Mendocino

Dec 15, 2015
DAPHNE MATZIARAKI

  Federally, marijuana production is still a major crime – one that can land you in prison for decades. Yet, in northern California, there’s a whole economy built around it. 

The Cutaway: Cannabis Cup

Dec 9, 2015
Liz Mak

 

Ever seen those huge billboards above the 101 Freeway, advertising for the HempCon or this weekend’s Emerald Cup in Sonoma, and wondered what these marijuana festivals and competitions are all about?

"Ranger on marijuana grows eradication duty" by Park Ranger licensed under CC BY-NC-SA, cropped from the original

Advocates of legalizing marijuana in California received some encouraging news this week: On Monday a broad coalition of supporters, including Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, announced that they’re backing a 2016 ballot measure.

Daily news roundup for Monday, April 20, 2015

Apr 20, 2015
Sam Wolson / San Francisco Chronicle

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Scientists find radioactive WWII aircraft carrier off San Francisco coast // San Jose Mercury News

A 21st century approach to drug control

Jan 16, 2013

A note to readers and listeners: An earlier version of this transcript incorrectly identified the quotation above from Professor Rob MacCoun as being stated by Beau Kilmer, Senior Policy Analyst at the RAND Institute's Drug Policy Research Center. The text has been edited to correct this error, but the audio has not been updated.

2013 marks one hundred years since California outlawed marijuana – and with the state supreme court poised to decide the fate of medical marijuana next month, the relationship between California and the drug could change yet again.

City Visions explores the policy conflicts facing the marijuana legalization movement in California. Do the recent ballot victories in Colorado and Washington provide new momentum for cannabis legalization in the Golden State? Or will enforcement of federal law by the Department of Justice prevent California from forging its own vision for the use and sale of marijuana?  Host Victoria Thorp discusses these questions and more with guests Dr. Robert MacCoun, Professor of Public Policy and Law, UC Berkeley, Beau Kilmer, Senior Policy Analyst at the RAND Institute's Drug Policy Research Center, and Dale Gieringer, Director of Cal NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws).

Additional resources:

Last month, Governor Jerry Brown,  speaking on CNN, said:  “It’s time for the Justice Department to recognize the sovereignty of the states. We already have a fair amount of marijuana use in the guise of medical marijuana, so we are capable of self-government. We don’t need some federal gendarme to come tell us what to do.”

Cannabis news roundup Sept. 19, 2012

Sep 19, 2012

There’s more bad news for teen boys smoking cannabis, but some good news for adults with certain cancers:

David Nutt is the former chair of the UK Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs. He might still have that post if not for the horses.

In a rational (and non-political) examination of harmful activities, he noted that around ten people die each year in the United Kingdom while riding horses. And there are more than a hundred traffic accidents involving horses annually, some also resulting in death.

Cannabis news roundup: September 4, 2012

Sep 4, 2012

(CourthouseNews.com)  // Harborside Health Center’s landlord in San Jose is asking a federal judge to stop HHC from growing or storing marijuana on the property, saying that they thought it was legal to operate such a dispensary when they originally leased the space. The move is an attempt to prevent the U.S. Dept. of Justice from seizing the property for harboring illegal activities.

Cannabis news roundup: August 23, 2012

Aug 23, 2012

(Americans for Safe Access) // The Los Angeles ban on cannabis dispensaries is now on shaky legal ground after the State Supreme Court tossed out the case upon which the decision rests.

Pages