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City Visions: How do we pay for public education?

Feb 10, 2020
William_Potter/iStock

In the 1970s, California ranked 7th out of all states in per pupil funding. Now it's 41st  in the nation according to Governor Gavin Newsom. The education budget line is robust, but most Californians think it is not enough. How does the state pay for public education, K through college? Will the new Prop. 13, a $15 billion bond measure, change the landscape? What about efforts to reform the old Prop 13, which restricted property taxes that were used to pay for schools? 

Steve Rhodes / Flickr / Creative Commons

 

The median home sales price in San Francisco is $1.35 million. The median rent of a one bedroom apartment is $3,700 per month. It’s a lot of money.

ELECTION BRIEFS: Measure RR - BART bonds

Nov 4, 2016

BART opened 44 years ago, in 1972. Now, the system is wearing out. Break-downs and delays have become more common, and as our population grows, the system has become overcrowded.

Jeremy Dalmas

It’s election season. So of course, I’m at the bar El Rio in San Francisco doing what everyone loves to do over a beer -- chat about municipal bonds. I’m asking people:  Do you know what a bond is?

ELECTION BRIEFS: Prop 51 - Bonds for schools

Oct 26, 2016

If Proposition 51 passes, the state would issue nine billion dollars in bonds for school construction — most of it going to K-12 schools and community colleges. The rest will be spent on charter schools and technical programs. The money could be used for anything, from building new schools to rooting out asbestos.

This measure is all about revenue bonds. Bonds are the state’s way of borrowing money for projects that are too big to pay for all at once: big construction projects like dams, highways or bridges. Right now, the state doesn’t need voter approval to sell revenue bonds; they can just sell them to investors, regardless of the amount.

The Bridge: Real heroes read audits

Jul 8, 2016
Kyle Trefny

San Francisco voters have approved over $3 billion in loans for public infrastructure over the last decade. Some of the people who make sure the projects stay on track are ordinary citizens who spend their free time reading bond reports. Who ... signs up for this?

Van Corey, used under CC / Flickr

  

On the March 2nd edition of Your Call, we’ll dig to the roots of Puerto Rico’s fiscal crisis. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/14012643775
Under CC license from Flickr user torbakhopper

Since 2008, San Franciscans have signed off on more than two billion dollars worth of bonds. A bond is a loan taken out by the city to pay for big projects. But who keeps track of all that money?