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Transportation authorities in the Bay Area have been facing low ridership and higher cleaning costs since the pandemic began. 

Reginald James / Public Domain

 


Leaders at BART have pledged to shift $2 million from sworn officers and fare inspectors to unarmed ambassadors. These staff would wear uniforms and patrol the trains unarmed.

Pi.1415926535 / Obtained from Wikipedia under Creative Commons licensing


 On Tuesday afternoon BART officials released a statement, saying that another of their employees has tested positive for the coronavirus.

John Martinez Pavliga / Flickr / Creative Commons

 


A public records request has confirmed stark racial disparities in BART fare evasion enforcement.

 

Porfirio Rangel / KALW

If you take BART often, your ride has probably been interrupted by folks playing instruments, rapping, dancing — or all of the above. This month, BART’s Board of Directors will be considering a ban on aggressive panhandling, which might effectively put an end to busking on board.

Will BART damage my hearing?

Mar 26, 2019
Eli Wirtschafter

This question came from listener Michael Mackin. Since this story first aired in September 2016, nearly all of BART’s legacy fleet have new, quieter wheels and 60 new cars have gone into service. 

Last call on BART

Mar 14, 2019
Jeremy Dalmas

From our Audiograph series:

Unlike other metro systems, BART shuts down for several hours a day for routine maintenance. That likely won’t change unless they build another track under the Bay. Meaning if you don’t get into the Embarcadero station by 12:27 a.m. you’ll have to find another way across the Bay. And, this isn’t your quiet-but-crowded morning commute.

How dirty is BART, actually?

Feb 12, 2019
Selene Ross / KALW

After disagreeing whether or not the seats on BART were clean enough to sit on, KALW listeners Chloe Hinkson and Nadine Sebai had to ask: “How dirty is BART, like, actually?”

Resilience and hope at Oscar Grant vigil

Jan 8, 2019

This month is the tenth anniversary of the death of 22-year-old Oscar Grant, who was shot and killed by a BART officer on January 1, 2009. Every New Year’s Day since, his family has held a vigil at Fruitvale Station in his honor.

 

22-year-old Oscar Grant was killed by a BART police officer ten years ago this month. His death led to calls for reform of BART’s police department. Ten years later, has that reform happened? And has it worked?

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

The fight over housing in the Bay Area has turned up even in the elections for BART’s board of directors. The candidates are divided as to whether the agency should build more housing near its stations, or stay focused on running the trains on time.

Commons license of CC-BY-SA

  

Every Wednesday until Election Day on November 6th, Your Call will host a special second hour at 11 a.m. 

For Part 2 of our 3-Part Series on Course Correcting Climate Change, City Visions co-host Ethan Elkind  reports on the highlights of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco. 

Flikr User Thomas Hawk / used under CC BY-NC 2.0

BART riders are on edge after a spate of killings on the system, including the brutal stabbing of 18-year-old Nia Wilson. In the wake of the violence, the transit agency announced plans for a $28 million dollar security package. That proposal includes a ban on panhandling, a fierce crackdown on fare evasion, and a ramped up surveillance system.

It’s not just you. That morning commute is getting longer and longer. As the local economy picks up steam, more and more people are getting in their cars, riding BART, and hopping on their bikes to get to work. This means everyone is spending more time on the road and is doing it less comfortably.

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

The Transbay Transit Center in downtown San Francisco finally opens this weekend.

It was supposed to be the “Grand Central Station of the West,” connecting buses, BART, Caltrain, and high-speed rail. But so far, it’s a $2.1 billion bus stop with a green roof.

Hey Area: Why doesn't BART go to Marin?

Jul 17, 2018
Wikimedia user Utilizer, used under CC BY-SA 4.0 / resized and cropped

KALW listener Lori from El Cerrito wrote in to ask why BART doesn’t go to Marin.

Eli Wirtschafter

Activist Lateefah Simon ran for the BART Board of Directors, and won, in part because of the killing of Oscar Grant. She’s now helping the agency navigate troubled waters following the killing by BART police of another young, unarmed black man — Sahleem Tindle.

Why are BART announcements so hard to understand?

Nov 8, 2017
Andy Bosselman / KALW

When you ride BART, there’s usually a moment where you look up from your phone and wonder: "Where am I?" That’s when announcements are supposed to help.

Putting the art back in BART

Jun 6, 2017
Reis Thebault

Travelers at the Orinda BART station are in a hurry. They don’t seem to notice the abstract, multicolored, geometric shapes on each wall. 

@PickerCPUC

The Environmental Protection Agency is one of the hardest-hit agencies in President Trump's preliminary budget. The blueprint slashes the EPA's budget by nearly one third.

"2569" by flikr user Jeremy Brooks used under CC license. Resized and cropped.

 

There’s been a 45 percent increase in mental health-related calls to BART police since 2011. When officers don’t know what to do, they call Armando Sandoval.

Photo by Holly McDede

When you think of the tools in a police officer’s toolkit, you probably think of devices like handcuffs, pepper spray, and stun guns. But there’s another device that you probably haven’t heard of. It’s called the WRAP. 

J.C. Howard

Many people in the heavily Democratic Bay Area awoke, as if from a bad dream, to a new political reality Wednesday morning. 

ELECTION BRIEFS: Measure RR - BART bonds

Nov 4, 2016

BART opened 44 years ago, in 1972. Now, the system is wearing out. Break-downs and delays have become more common, and as our population grows, the system has become overcrowded.

Measure RR: BART asks voters to fund a major rebuild

Nov 1, 2016
Eli Wirtschafter

 

Supporters of Measure RR like to say that BART is as old as Pong – the classic arcade game involving two rectangles playing tennis with a square.

“In 1972, Atari’s Pong was the state-of-the-art video game,” says BART director Robert Raburn. Nowadays, “you don't find an Atari Pong machine anywhere on the street.”

Every Thursday through Election Day, Rose Aguilar will host a special second hour of Your Call at 11am focused on local and state elections, the voting system, and the democratic process in California.

This week, we'll discuss transportation measures and races. We'll also talk about California Prop 59, which asks voters if they want state officials to work to amend the Constitution and reverse Citizens United.

Guests:

Joe Fitz Rodriguez, reporter for the SF Examiner covering City Hall and transportation

Angela Johnston

 

In 2018, Bay Area commuters will be able to go a little bit farther on BART. The transit agency is building a 10-mile extension from the Pittsburgh station, to Antioch.

Daily News Roundup for Thursday, May 26, 2016

May 26, 2016
by Robert Campbell - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library, used under CC BY-SA 3.0 // Cropped

Rising reality // San Francisco Chronicle

"Fifty years ago, Bay Area residents rallied around the call to save San Francisco Bay. Public action on an unprecedented scale reversed development tides that for more than a century had covered shallow waters with land for industrial parks and housing tracts, roadways and garbage dumps.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: The BART operator

May 5, 2016
Eli Wirtschafter

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

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